Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Skin still itching, strange symptoms

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 13 Replies
  • Posted By: Nr1017
  • December 2, 2008
  • 03:09 AM

Im 15 years old, and a while ago I made a thread explaining how my skin was itching. It was suggested that I take anti-histamines, try B12 tablets, and see an allergist. I have done all of these things, and I am still suffering. I have been on several anti histamines, which made little to no difference. I take the B12 tablets daily, and I dont see a change. I saw an allergist, but it was easy to see that she really didnt believe me. She said that it is probably just a "phase", or some kind of hormonal thing that has to do with puberty. Right now, I am currently taking a new medication called DOXEPIN. My symptoms are as follows-

Itching and redness on the face (primairly the cheeks), arms, chest, back, legs, and thyes, and sometimes on other places

Face feels very sticky, and very warm to the touch

Face looks swollen, mostly around the cheeks and lips

Arms look darker than usual, and there is often a blochy redness on my arms and hands

I am not positive, but it looks like there might be some small warts on my chest and arms. I dont know if this is related or not.

After taking a hot shower, my legs and face become EXTREMELY red and itchy

Symptoms are sometimes triggered by rigerous exercise, stress, intense heat, hot showers, and physical preasure on my body (if I lean my face on my hand, my face might start to itch)

This has been going on since last JUNE. I dont know how much longer I can take it... It has become so hard for me to concentrate in school, and to just have simple fun. These symptoms bother me on an everyday basis. I just want to get on with my life....I fear that if I dont get a cure soon, I may have to live with this for the rest of my life. Please, if you are suffering the same symptoms or know what is happening to me, respond ASAP.

Reply Flag this Discussion

13 Replies:

  • How is your digestion - do you have gas and bloating after you eat? How are your stools - how frequent and any IBS symptoms (irritable bowel)? Are you male or female? Are you taking any other medications at this time other than the one mentioned? Do you have sinus issues like sinus infections or ear infections? Do you drink coffee or tea or caffeinated drinks? Energy sodas? DOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 03:19 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I am a male, I havent been having too much gas or digestion problems, I am pretty sure that I dont have any sinus issues, and the only caffinated drink I have is soda, but I barely have had any the past summer. The only medication I am currently taking is DOXEPIN and B12 tablets
    Nr1017 5 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 03:23 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • You say your arms "look darker." Do you mean like a suntan, like bronze? If so, you might want to look into hemachromatosis.
    aquila 1263 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 05:30 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Itching and redness on the face (primairly the cheeks), arms, chest, back, legs, and thyes, and sometimes on other placesFace feels very sticky, and very warm to the touchFace looks swollen, mostly around the cheeks and lipsArms look darker than usual, and there is often a blochy redness on my arms and handsI am not positive, but it looks like there might be some small warts on my chest and arms. I dont know if this is related or not.After taking a hot shower, my legs and face become EXTREMELY red and itchySymptoms are sometimes triggered by rigerous exercise, stress, intense heat, hot showers, and physical preasure on my body (if I lean my face on my hand, my face might start to itch)Sounds like a food or drug allergy, but a lot of your symptoms also sound like "prickly heat" also called miliaria. Prickly heat can occur in several different areas at the same time, although it tends to be most common in areas that rub against clothing, or furniture, and in areas where you sweat a lot. For example, on the back of your legs where your legs are pressed against your chair in class, where there is tight clothing (eg/ the elastic of your underpants), and pressure points (eg/ if you sleep on your side, it might be the worst on the hip and shoulder you're lying on). Prickly heat can also give you papules which can look sort of like little warts.It's caused by sweat ducts getting plugged by dead skin cells and/or the run-of-the-mill skin bacteria (the same bacteria related to acne). It's most common in children and babies who have under developed sweat glands. But any age can suffer from it (eg/ I know someone who gets it viciously when camping who is 36.)It is definitely exacerbated by heat and exercise (but then pretty much ALL rashes are aggravated by heat and sweating).That said, you should check with your doctor about side effects to the Doxepin. Rashes and hives are common allergic reactions to drugs. Not so much common with Doxepin, but you should check with your doctor just in case.You'll want to look into possible allergies: food, soap, etc. Find a new allergist.To try to deal with the rash itself, ask your doctor if it's okay to try an over-the-counter corticosteroid cream like 1% hydrocortisone and an anti-histamine like Benadryll. NOTE: Not all anti-histamines are equal. Benadryll (which is diphenhydramine hydrochloride) is probably the best over-the-counter anti-histamine for hives and rashes. If you were using Claritin before, it probably didn't help. Wear loose clothing and do your best to stay cool and dry.My friend who suffers from prickly heat had to deal with the rash using a much stronger prescription-strength corticosteroid and a powerful prescription-strength anti-histamine.
    OnceBlue 6 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 09:10 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Sounds like a food or drug allergy, but a lot of your symptoms also sound like "prickly heat" also called miliaria. Prickly heat can occur in several different areas at the same time, although it tends to be most common in areas that rub against clothing, or furniture, and in areas where you sweat a lot. For example, on the back of your legs where your legs are pressed against your chair in class, where there is tight clothing (eg/ the elastic of your underpants), and pressure points (eg/ if you sleep on your side, it might be the worst on the hip and shoulder you're lying on). Prickly heat can also give you papules which can look sort of like little warts.It's caused by sweat ducts getting plugged by dead skin cells and/or the run-of-the-mill skin bacteria (the same bacteria related to acne). It's most common in children and babies who have under developed sweat glands. But any age can suffer from it (eg/ I know someone who gets it viciously when camping who is 36.)It is definitely exacerbated by heat and exercise (but then pretty much ALL rashes are aggravated by heat and sweating).That said, you should check with your doctor about side effects to the Doxepin. Rashes and hives are common allergic reactions to drugs. Not so much common with Doxepin, but you should check with your doctor just in case.You'll want to look into possible allergies: food, soap, etc. Find a new allergist.To try to deal with the rash itself, ask your doctor if it's okay to try an over-the-counter corticosteroid cream like 1% hydrocortisone and an anti-histamine like Benadryll. NOTE: Not all anti-histamines are equal. Benadryll (which is diphenhydramine hydrochloride) is probably the best over-the-counter anti-histamine for hives and rashes. If you were using Claritin before, it probably didn't help. Wear loose clothing and do your best to stay cool and dry.My friend who suffers from prickly heat had to deal with the rash using a much stronger prescription-strength corticosteroid and a powerful prescription-strength anti-histamine.
    OnceBlue 6 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 09:13 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Well, there are 18 towers and 113 antenas within 4 miles of my residence. I dont think any of them are too new, though. And I took the Electro Sensitivity Symptoms test, and out of the 20 or so possible symtoms, I only have 3 of them.
    Nr1017 5 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 09:23 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Sounds like a food or drug allergy, but a lot of your symptoms also sound like "prickly heat" also called miliaria. Prickly heat can occur in several different areas at the same time, although it tends to be most common in areas that rub against clothing, or furniture, and in areas where you sweat a lot. For example, on the back of your legs where your legs are pressed against your chair in class, where there is tight clothing (eg/ the elastic of your underpants), and pressure points (eg/ if you sleep on your side, it might be the worst on the hip and shoulder you're lying on). Prickly heat can also give you papules which can look sort of like little warts.It's caused by sweat ducts getting plugged by dead skin cells and/or the run-of-the-mill skin bacteria (the same bacteria related to acne). It's most common in children and babies who have under developed sweat glands. But any age can suffer from it (eg/ I know someone who gets it viciously when camping who is 36.)It is definitely exacerbated by heat and exercise (but then pretty much ALL rashes are aggravated by heat and sweating).That said, you should check with your doctor about side effects to the Doxepin. Rashes and hives are common allergic reactions to drugs. Not so much common with Doxepin, but you should check with your doctor just in case.You'll want to look into possible allergies: food, soap, etc. Find a new allergist.To try to deal with the rash itself, ask your doctor if it's okay to try an over-the-counter corticosteroid cream like 1% hydrocortisone and an anti-histamine like Benadryll. NOTE: Not all anti-histamines are equal. Benadryll (which is diphenhydramine hydrochloride) is probably the best over-the-counter anti-histamine for hives and rashes. If you were using Claritin before, it probably didn't help. Wear loose clothing and do your best to stay cool and dry.My friend who suffers from prickly heat had to deal with the rash using a much stronger prescription-strength corticosteroid and a powerful prescription-strength anti-histamine.Im not sure if you quite got my initial post... This isnt just a mild itch, or a small annoyance... IT IS AGONY!!! And it has been happening for 5 months. As I stated, I JUST started taking Doexpin, so I dont see how I could have been having an allergic reaction for the past five months, caused by a drug that I just started using! Why should I take your advice when you didnt even read a word I wrote!?!
    Nr1017 5 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 09:36 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Whoops, sorry about the double-pot above. I was having problems with time-outs on my computer. It seems to be resolved now.
    OnceBlue 6 Replies
    • December 2, 2008
    • 09:36 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • You could possibly be suffering from mold exposure. You have all of the symptoms. Do you live in a musty room or maybe at school there is exposure somewhere.A skin doctor, dermatologist, may rule that you have a whole body fungus and perhaps your mom should make that appointment.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • December 3, 2008
    • 00:28 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • For God's sake, this is caused by the Doxepin and if I understood your age correctly, you need to have your parents return you to your doctor promptly. Eosinophilia is a condition where certain types of cells in your blood become over-populated and the result is the type of itching and reddish appearance you are suffering. It makes it worse if you take a hot shower or get out in the heat. You need to have your medication changed to something you can better tolerate and I also suggest that your parents seek a second opionion for why a person of such a young age needs to be on a psychotropic like Doxepin. Again, have your parents take you to your doctor. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • December 3, 2008
    • 00:53 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • This is not mold, prickly heat or cell phone antennas. This is a perfect example of why persons without a license to practice medicine should not be advising persons about healthcare questions, particularly when it comes from an adolescent. This is a potentially high-risk problem and needs to be addressed promptly. Either go to medical school and get a degree or stop advising people, particularly children, regarding medical questions. For God's sake, don't you people have the slightest degree of respect for anyone's safety. I have no objection to anyone providing support or even sharing similar circumstances, but this question comes from a child who hasn't the slightest clue what is taking place and for all of you to ramble on about mold and cell phone antennas is absolutely beyond comprehension and you should be ashamed of yourselves. This is absolutely over the top when it involves someone so young and you need to examine the reasons why all of you feel so compelled to try and practice clinical medicine in the clear absence of the requisite training. You're placing people at risk. Have you no regard for their safety? I'm fed up with the sort of nonsense I see being spewed out on helpless people who are genuinely seeking help and the fact that you are unable to recognize a potential health risk in someone like the young person on this posting is clear evidence that you have no business trying to somehow diagnose someone. I'm done participating here or having anything to do with this forum. It has proven time and again to represent more of a detriment that a platform of assistance. MOLD ????? CELL PHONE ANTENNAS???? What in God's name is wrong with you people? You should be ashamed.
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • December 3, 2008
    • 01:06 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Complications of Crohn’s Disease

    Recognize the risks associated with Crohn’s disease.

    8 Surprising Facts About Cholesterol

    Did you know that one in six US adults has high cholesterol?

  • For God's sake, this is caused by the Doxepin and if I understood your age correctly, you need to have your parents return you to your doctor promptly. Eosinophilia is a condition where certain types of cells in your blood become over-populated and the result is the type of itching and reddish appearance you are suffering. It makes it worse if you take a hot shower or get out in the heat. You need to have your medication changed to something you can better tolerate and I also suggest that your parents seek a second opionion for why a person of such a young age needs to be on a psychotropic like Doxepin. Again, have your parents take you to your doctor. Best regards, J Cottle, MDBut I have only just started taking the Doxepin. This has been going on for the past 5 months, and I just started taking Doxepin 2 weeks ago.
    Nr1017 5 Replies
    • December 3, 2008
    • 01:24 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • This is eosinophila. Have your parents return you to your doctor. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • December 3, 2008
    • 01:32 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.