Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Scarred that the doctor's can't figure it out!!

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 11 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • November 28, 2006
  • 04:25 PM

Can someone help me help doctor's figure out what's wrong? Symptoms: In september my left abdomen was hurting. I had left side pain. I went to the hospital they said I was having menstral symptoms. It was that time of the month so I doubted myself and said okay maybe. They gave me pain killers. Later I still had pain, with constipation,nausea, ear aches, laft and right arm pain. I went to a private doctor tested for STD's I was given antibiotics and pain killers. Tests came back negative I was still in pain went to different hospital again tested for STDS came back negative. Given transvaginal sonogram diagnosed with PID given triple dose of antibiotics. In the menatime had yeast infection possibly caused by antibiotics. I took something for the yeast infection. Last month, October, I had very light menstration that lasted 2 days, very unusual for me. This month, November, menstration was slightly longer and heavier. Now left pelvic region is hurting again but it's dull and there seems to be some type of pelvic mass protruding from vagina when I squat down to bathe and wash my private area. I went to a different doctor because of the pain I'm having in left side again and because I thought that none of this is normal, the doctor said it's normal for skin pockets to be there and that they see nothing. I went back because pain persists in pelvic region and sometimes I get pain in my vagina and anus. They also requested the test results from the hospital. They said that there was a small fibroid but that's normal, it shouldn't cause pain and it will go away on its own. Every trip to the doctor they say they don't see anything. Please help? My left lower abdominal also still hurts. I went back to the doctor yesterday and the doctor says she doesn't see anything. It seems like everyone thinks I am nuts!! This stuff is really going on and it's not funny! Please help!!

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11 Replies:

  • i had something similar..the doctors kept doing nothing, (one admitted that he thought i was faking it to get pain pills.He finally did a laparoscopy to shut me up. After 4 hrs of surgery to clear out a huge mass that was cementing my bowels together, and pulling one of my ovaries down into it, I was finally diagnosed with endometriosis.And yes, the doctor apologized profusely. Obviously i'm no longer seeing the ***k
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 29, 2006
    • 07:55 PM
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  • I am not a doctor by any means. Just a woman who has been misdiagnosed more times then I care to count. It will make you crazy at first then you will seek answers through research. It seems like the first action many doctors make is to prescribe pain pills as a band-aide. They still receive payment for a diagnosis they didn't have to think about. To actually find out what is the cause of a patient's discomfort, seems to be a new concept. Beware of narcotic pain medications if you are already constipated. They will further your constipation. When reading your symptoms, I find similarities to a prolapsed Uterus (a.k.a. Uterine prolapse) Check out www.medlineplus.comI have copy and pasted some information below. I hope it may help in your search for answers: Original Article: Uterine prolapse Introduction Uterine prolapse means your uterus has dropped from its position within the pelvis into your vagina. Normally, your uterus is held in place by the muscles and ligaments that make up your pelvic floor. Uterine prolapse results when pelvic floor muscles and ligaments weaken, providing inadequate support for the uterus. The uterus then descends into the vaginal canal.Uterine prolapse most often affects postmenopausal women who've had one or more vaginal deliveries. Damage to supportive tissues incurred during pregnancy and childbirth plus the effects of gravity, loss of estrogen and repeated straining over the years can weaken pelvic floor muscles and lead to prolapse.If you experience only mild uterine prolapse, treatment usually isn't needed. But if you experience discomfort or interruption of your lifestyle as a result of uterine prolapse, you might benefit from surgery to repair the prolapse, or you may elect to use a special supportive device (pessary), which is inserted into your vagina.Signs and symptoms Uterine prolapse varies in severity. You may have mild uterine prolapse and experience no signs or symptoms. Or you could have moderate to severe uterine prolapse. If that's the case, you may experience the following:Sensation of heaviness or pulling in your pelvisPain during intercourseSomething protruding from your vaginaLow back painSome women who have uterine prolapse describe feeling as if they're sitting on a small ball or as if something is falling out of their vagina. Symptoms tend to be less bothersome in the morning — after a long period of lying down — and worsen as the day goes on.Causes Pregnancy and trauma incurred during childbirth, particularly with large babies or after a difficult labor and delivery, are the main causes of muscle weakness leading to uterine prolapse. Loss of muscle tone associated with aging and reduced amounts of circulating estrogen after menopause also may contribute to uterine prolapse. In rare circumstances, uterine prolapse may be caused by a tumor in the pelvic cavity.Genetics also may play a role. Women of Northern European descent have a higher incidence of uterine prolapse than do women of Asian and African descent.Risk factors Certain factors may increase your risk of uterine prolapse:One or more pregnancies and vaginal birthsGiving birth to a large babyIncreasing ageFrequent heavy liftingChronic coughingFrequent straining during bowel movementsSome conditions, such as obesity, chronic constipation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), can place a strain on the muscles and connective tissue in your pelvis and may play a role in the development of uterine prolapse.When to seek medical advice If you develop any signs and symptoms of uterine prolapse — such as a feeling of fullness in your vagina or pain during intercourse — or if you also are experiencing difficulties urinating or having bowel movements, seek medical attention.Screening and diagnosis Diagnosing uterine prolapse requires a pelvic examination. You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in conditions affecting the female reproductive tract (gynecologist). The doctor will ask about your medical history, including how many pregnancies and vaginal deliveries you've had. He or she will perform a complete pelvic examination to check for signs of uterine prolapse. You may be examined while lying down and also while standing. Sometimes imaging tests, such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), might be performed to further evaluate the uterine prolapse.Complications In severe cases of uterine prolapse, you may develop sores (ulcers) in your vagina where the fallen uterus rubs against your skin and the thin skin lining your vaginal walls is exposed outside of your body. In rare cases, infection is a possibility.Also associated with uterine prolapse is prolapse of other pelvic organs, including your bladder and rectum. A prolapsed bladder bulges into the front part of your vagina, causing a cystocele that can lead to difficulty in urinating and increased risk of urinary tract infections. A prolapsed rectum causes a rectocele, which often leads to uncomfortable constipation and possibly hemorrhoids.Treatment Losing weight, stopping smoking and getting proper treatment for contributing medical problems, such as lung disease, may slow the progression of uterine prolapse.If you have very mild uterine prolapse, either without symptoms or with symptoms that aren't terribly bothersome, no treatment is necessary. However, you may continue to lose uterine support, which could require future treatment.Possible treatments for uterine prolapse include:Lifestyle changes. If you're overweight or obese, your doctor may suggest ways to achieve a healthy weight and maintain that weight. Exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercises) may help. Your doctor may advise you to avoid heavy lifting or straining.Vaginal pessary. A vaginal pessary fits inside the vagina and is designed to hold the uterus in place. The pessary can be a temporary or permanent form of treatment. The device comes in many shapes and sizes, so your doctor will measure and fit you for the device. Once the pessary is in place, your doctor may have you walk, sit, squat and bear down to make sure that the pessary fits you correctly, doesn't become dislodged and feels reasonably comfortable. You'll be asked to return a few days after insertion of the pessary to check that it's still in the correct position. You may be advised to remove the device and clean it with soap and water periodically. Your doctor will show you how to remove and reinsert the device.There are some drawbacks to these devices. A vaginal pessary will be of little use for a woman with severe uterine prolapse. Additionally, a vaginal pessary can irritate vaginal tissues, possibly to the point of causing small sores (ulcers). Some women with vaginal pessaries report a foul-smelling discharge, which requires removal and cleaning of the device by a physician. Pessaries may interfere with sexual intercourse.Surgery to repair uterine prolapse. If lifestyle changes fail to provide relief from symptoms of uterine prolapse or pessary use isn't desirable, surgical repair is an option. The surgery involves repairing your pelvic floor muscles by grafting your own tissue, donor tissue or some synthetic material in such a way that it provides support to your pelvic organs. Often, doctors recommend surgical removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) as well. Doctors generally prefer to perform the surgical repair vaginally because it's associated with less pain after surgery, faster healing and a better cosmetic result. However, vaginal surgery may not provide as lasting a fix as abdominal surgery. And if you didn't have your uterus removed during surgery, prolapse can recur. Laparoscopic techniques — using smaller abdominal incisions, a lighted camera-type device (laparoscope) to guide the surgeon and specialized surgical instruments — offer a minimally invasive approach to abdominal surgery.Not everyone is a good candidate for surgery to repair uterine prolapse. This includes women who plan to have more children. Pregnancy and delivery of a baby put strain on the supportive tissues of the uterus and can undo the benefits of surgical repair. Other women who aren't recommended for surgery include older women for whom the risks of surgery are too great. Pessary use may be the best treatment choice for these women.
    gypsy_spirit05 1 Replies
    • November 30, 2006
    • 10:40 AM
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  • Thank you I really appreciate your responses I've been doing research on both conditions uterine prolapse and endometriosis and both seem to be a place to start. I can better guide the doctor's in figuring out what is wrong!!! It was just frustrating when I started to do research and had no idea where to start. My next doctor's visit I am going to demand better answers because it really is scary and frustrating!!! I do want to mention that I am 27 and never been pregnant.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 30, 2006
    • 07:01 PM
    • 0
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  • I know what you mean. I am 29 and my dreams to become pregnant someday, continues to be further and further away. I have been dealing with doctor's for a long time now. I just had major surgery on what I just found out was cancer, at the end of May. Mind you, the first doctor in 99 removed it when it was very small. She claimed it was harmless before she even removed it, which resulted in an attitude when I asked her to remove it anyway. She failed to send it to a pathologist or did send it and failed to tell me it was a slow growing locally aggressive cancer. Surgery 7 years later...extremely wide excission, deforming me for the rest of my life. I hear so often how lucky I am to survive cancer. I respond, I am lucky to survive the original doctor. The U.S. has the type of advanced technology, most countries could only dream about. That is why it is so confusing, when the doctor's are too lazy to research the answer to a medical problem. Instead many would like to give a fix-all band-aide like pain pills. They aren't all bad. Just learn how to research and be very careful not to over diagnose yourself.So many medical issues carry the same/similar symptoms. Good luck.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 30, 2006
    • 08:13 PM
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  • More symptoms: My period started on Dec.1st but it was really light, on the second day it was real heavy, the pain I've been having on my left side became more severe, along with nausea and severe back pain. I have made an appointment for this week. So we'll see what happens!!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 6, 2006
    • 03:37 AM
    • 0
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  • This sounds just like endometrios. Only way to know for sure is surgery. It is a simple outpatient. But I think you need to depand it. I am going through this now I am 35 had a partial hystorectomy at 26. left with one ovairy. Pain is back worse than ever sex is the worst prob. gettting ready for surgey again. but dont make them think you are crazy. This is real and it hurts. I too have lower back pain nausea pelvic pain. Hope this helps
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 10, 2006
    • 06:49 AM
    • 0
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  • I've never had endometriosis but a friend of mine did. She described the same symptoms you describe. The doctor put her on a light oral contraceptive. Endometriosis is caused by the endometrium, that is supposed to stay in the uterus, spreading into the pelvic region causing inflamation and pain. Taking birth control pills gets the endrometrium to return to the uterus were it belongs and keeps it there. My friend was on birth control pills for a while but is off of them now and has not had any reaccurance.For more information check out the link below that I found on the net:http://www.healthywomen.org/healthtopics/endometriosis/q/L2/24/L1/3/
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 11, 2006
    • 09:27 AM
    • 0
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  • do a biopsy of an endometrium...check for endometriosis..and during your symptoms go to another dr...a better one...it could also be an ovarian cyst, they may put you on birth control...but then again, alot of it cannot be diagnosed unless they do a laparascopic procedure..and, if you did have a large mass, they should be able to idenify it by doing a pelvic exam and ultrasound..
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 11, 2006
    • 07:03 PM
    • 0
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  • More symptoms: My period started on Dec.1st but it was really light, on the second day it was real heavy, the pain I've been having on my left side became more severe, along with nausea and severe back pain. I have made an appointment for this week. So we'll see what happens!!Hello, I have also been going through the Russia roulet call "doctors notsureus" Two Years ago I started getting abdominal pain in my right side, always in the same spot but could spread out. No rhyme or reason for it. Then my periods have changed, I was very regular, always the same flow. Sex became quite painful, and nausea seemed to be never far away.Well I had given up untill about 4 months ago on going to the doctor. I was told it was my bowels, given medication that made me ill, I was made to fell for a year and a half that my pain was in my mind. I started wondering if I was starting early menapose. Well to try to make a long story short. I went and had Thermal Image scan That was being offered at my health club by a mobile medical screening company. The scan showed a problem in my abdomen The test said " Hyperthermia is noted in the suprapubic region and appears consistent with uterine or adnexal dysfunction" I took this to my doctor, and since I am now having a lot of test to rule out problems, I am now being taken seriously, Have had a Laparoscopy last week, in which they found an grossly enlarged uterus. Now I just have to wait for answers on that! I have told you this to let you know, you know your body, you know if your pain is real! Explore your options. Look for ways you are comfortable with to find out what your body is trying to tell you. It is not in your mind. and Good Luck!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 20, 2006
    • 01:07 AM
    • 0
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  • This sounds like possible Endometriosis to me too. And the problem is (this might lessen your load a little) usually the less Endometriosis you have the more pain you have. I have been to soooo many doctors & specialists (& have so many bills) that is unreal from misdiagnosis. I did not have Endometriosis very bad, but my pain was pretty severe.Please research as much as you can & the only way to definitely diagnose Endometriosis is with a Laparoscopy.Good luck
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 21, 2006
    • 05:12 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi I'm Deb,25 Yrs Old And Have Recently Had Chlamydia And Have Now Been Told I've Got P.i.d But I Really Dont Know What To Think Now,i've Had All The Symtoms Of It-feeling Sick,been Sick Once,lower And Middle Back Pain,pain In My Pelvic Areas And Feeling Tired And Weak All The Time.i've Been Bleeding Heavily Since Last Febuarary,my Periods Have Never Been Normal And Have Always Had Trouble With Them.I'm Sick To Death Of This Now.i Am Now Waiting For My Scan Now,roll-on.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 11, 2007
    • 03:10 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
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