Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 8 Replies
  • Posted By: Daanny
  • November 15, 2009
  • 01:55 PM

I can't reverse my reactive hypoglycemia.
My blood sugar crashes several times a day and when it happens I start to sweat, get anxious and irritable and my legs feel sheavy and I forget everything and when thinking it feels like thinking through clouds and then I get sleepy and weak.

I did a Glucose Tolerance Test and my blood sugar crashed to 42 but the doctor said it's not hypoglycemia because hypoglycemia has been removed from the list of proper diagnosis years ago when they found out it was a fad!

I have tried a low-carb diet Atkins style but had no success so far, my blood sugar is always low and I feel terrible all the time.

Reply Flag this Discussion

8 Replies:

  • You sound very similar to me! I also have taken the glucose tolerance test several times and the doctor told me there's nothing wrong with my blood sugar. However, I experience the same symptoms as you. Hunger is the worst feeling in the world for me. I'd almost rather die than feel the way I do when I'm hungry! And I'm so tired of doctors saying they can't find out why I feel this way. I guess we just have to live with it. I know this doesn't help you any but maybe someone else will have an answer. Good luck!
    noremac94 1 Replies
    • December 18, 2009
    • 04:37 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • You sound very similar to me! I also have taken the glucose tolerance test several times and the doctor told me there's nothing wrong with my blood sugar. However, I experience the same symptoms as you. Hunger is the worst feeling in the world for me. I'd almost rather die than feel the way I do when I'm hungry! And I'm so tired of doctors saying they can't find out why I feel this way. I guess we just have to live with it. I know this doesn't help you any but maybe someone else will have an answer. Good luck!Thanks for the support!I feel a bit better since I wrote that post as I found a bit of strategies that works. If you post your email or another contect we can discuss what we can do to improve our conditiong.
    Daanny 1 Replies
    • December 19, 2009
    • 05:25 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I don't know if this is the answer for you two, but it has been for me for years (a way of managing, feeling much better, anyway). Try doing what my naturalpath told me to try (it makes me feel much better!): go for at least two weeks without sugar (including excessive natural sugar, avoiding too many sweeter fruits), and eat protien every few hours, and eat every few hours (a little at a time). Then see how you feel, and obviously if you feel better, continue doing what works for you.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 14, 2010
    • 10:47 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • is this for real??? #1...hypoglycemia is not a fad. Good grief already. It can kill you, as you can go into a coma and then death can occur if your blood sugars are not immediately brought back up. Who the heck was the quack who does not know the simpliest of symthoms and concerns with hypoglycemia? #2...No wonder the Adkins low carb diet did not work for you. You need carbs to raise your blood sugars. You can buy flavored and plain glucose tabs at any drug counter. You should keep them on hand at all times, as well as a good glucometer, so that when you feel the symthoms of hypo coming on, test your blood sugars, and then use the glucose tabs to get it up to a normal range for you. In lieu of the glucose tas, drink a glass of milk and eat some graham crackers. But....get your blood sugars back up!! Avoid candy or sweets, as it will raise your blood sugars, but will not sustain them, so they will drop again. #3. For Goodness Sake....get a different Doctor. You need an Endocrinologist...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 14, 2010
    • 11:51 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • is this for real??? #1...hypoglycemia is not a fad. Good grief already. It can kill you, as you can go into a coma and then death can occur if your blood sugars are not immediately brought back up. Who the heck was the quack who does not know the simpliest of symthoms and concerns with hypoglycemia? #2...No wonder the Adkins low carb diet did not work for you. You need carbs to raise your blood sugars. You can buy flavored and plain glucose tabs at any drug counter. You should keep them on hand at all times, as well as a good glucometer, so that when you feel the symthoms of hypo coming on, test your blood sugars, and then use the glucose tabs to get it up to a normal range for you. In lieu of the glucose tas, drink a glass of milk and eat some graham crackers. But....get your blood sugars back up!! Avoid candy or sweets, as it will raise your blood sugars, but will not sustain them, so they will drop again. #3. For Goodness Sake....get a different Doctor. You need an Endocrinologist...Ok, I read all of this. Here is my version:I was on a very physical course, the Sunday it was about 43'C. The Monday morning we started with PT, temperatures already skyhigh...with full gear on. I was sweating profusely, taking fluids, but surely not enough. A few hours in, I collapsed, dehydrated, hyperventilating, heart palpitations...admitted to hospital with IV's given through the night. The Tuesday Im back, PT...etc. (lots of physical stuff). Temperature 50'C at 10:00am right through until past four pm. At 6 pm we started activities again. No sleep at night.Wednesday 7am, starting to vomit. Sweating profusely, confused, hunger, not urinating, needles & pins, double vision, severe abdominal pain, migraine, breathing difficulties, heart palpitations, collapse(injuring myself in the process). Sugar 1.4 Hypoglycemic. Admitted to hospital. The dr on duty told me to see a psychologist for abdominal pain, migraine...he never gave me any pain medication, only IV's again.I bought a glucometer, spoke to a dr, who told me that I do not suffer from diabetes. My question is why are the drs not interested in the cause of this rather than merely blaming it on heat. Please note that there were 100 people participating in this course. I was the only one who collapsed.As far as I can see, hypoglycemia can be caused by a number of factors, including a very dangerous cancer in the pancreas...is it not reason to make sure it just is not that???What do I do?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 16, 2010
    • 06:30 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I am a life long sufferer of low blood sugar but I have kept it fairly well managed at most times. Here is what works for me and some of this might work for you: (and fyi a high protein low carb diet caused me severe low blood sugar problems -- my father also -- we could not sustain it and I wasn't even on Atkins but simply gluten free (and wheat is everywhere)). (1) BANDAIDE #1 - PROTEINEat 20 grams of protein at breakfast (I am not saying eat more protein, I am saying move some of it earlier in the day) and do not skip breakfast. Prortein slows your digestion and the glucose rise from eating. You are using it as a bandaide but it has NO BAD EFFECT if you don't actually increase your protein but just use it wisely. (Protein is acidic and can upset your ph if you take too much, also has cancer causing byproducts, etc...in fact a low protein diet is second best to a low calorie diet in increasing longevity -- so don't go hog-wild with the protein bandaide, but USE it). This tip came from a study reported by 60's nutritionist Adele Davis. (2) BANDAIDE #2 - ACIDChoose foods which taste acidic (natural foods as these actually turn alkaline when they are metabolized so ddon't disturb your ph). For example, use apple cider vinegar whenever works for you -- on your salad or put a few teaspoons or a tablespoon in a glass of water and drink it. Not other kinds of vinegar - apple cider vinegar metabolizes to an alkaline. Choose sourdough bread whenever you can -- the acid in the bread will slow the starch into your system. This tip comes from "The Glycemic Revolution" reporting on the studies out of Australia which go beyond the glycemic index of foods. Get a copy of this book and read it for concrete examples of actual foods tested for slow sugar rising properties. (3) Supplement with those things that diabetics are commonly found deficient in as low blood sugar is related to diabetes and may lead to it. All diabetics are low in zinc...I supplemented it all my life but made myself low in copper -- don't do that! They say 15mg zinc requires maybe 3 g copper. The problem is they both compete for the same limitted amount of metallothione for absorption. You may have to supplement copper separately since zinc interferes with it's absorption. Both copper and zinc are required to make powerful cellular anti-oxidant ZnCuSOD which is critical to diabetics as high blood sugar is damaging to many tissues. the other supplements I know of important to diabetics are chromium and vanadium. Chromium is one of the top ten supplements linked to long life -- good for everyone. I don't know anything about vanadium except low vanadium is linked to diabetes (and I know I have low chromium and vanadium via hair analysis). fyi, although I have low blood sugar, my blood sugar is more elevated after eating than a normal persons, yet it comes down promptly and usually not precipitously. (4) Consider rhodiola. When I turned 48 or so I started getting undeserved low blood sugar attacks. Even if I ate my protein etc, ifsomeone cut me off in traffic (which happens probably 3x/day) I would not be able to stop shaking until I ate something. I researched and decided I probably had either a liver or adrenal problem. I discounted a liver problem because I take 600 mg/day milk thistle to protect my liver and that is golden. So I figured my adrenal gland was not telling my liver to break down glycogen and since I am vegetarian I did not want to take a glandular so I looked further for a solution and came up with Rhodiola. It is a plant that grows in the Himalayahs and the Hunza drink a tea made from it to which their long life is creditted (they are the longest lived peoples on the planet). I took Rhodiola for a month and it took care of all my undeserved low blood sugar woes. I discontinued it and was fine for a year when the problem happened again, and again a month of rhodiola cured it. I concluded something was hitting my adrenal gland pretty hard and figured it was probably stress. In fact, your ability to handle stress is governed by your DHEA:cortisol level and DHEA levels peak at 30 and by age 50 there are thousands of studioes showing many benefits to people supplementing 50 mg (under a doctor's care -- you need to have your hormones tested if you do this because DHEA turns into estrogen, testosterone, etc). So I figure what was happening was my ability to handle stress was lowered and I was running on adrenaline which was burning out my adrenal gland. Anyway, rhodiola is a great supplement for hypoglycemics IMHO. I cannot tell you the dose as I do not remember...I have surely changed brands and doses a hundred times. I should mentiuon that rhodiola caused me to have 1 arrythmia/day when I first laid down in the evening. It was a slowed heart rate, not a speeded up one, and that is why I did not want to take it once my problem went away. However I later discovered that olive leaf extract cancels that arrythmia. I do not remember the dose I was taking to stop it because I now take quite a high dose for other reasons -- 1g/day prevents the glycation of blood vessels caused by blood sugar. www.lef.org says that rhodiola "increases gylcogen stores". Not sure if that's why it helps, but it sounds like it, doesn't it? I took it because it is a general adaptogen for the adrenal gland. (5) Depending on your age, you might consider hormone replacement. DHEA levels peak at 30 and by 50 most people are sufficiently deficient that 50mg/day has many benefits for them...in this cause increasing the ability to handle stress. DHEA makes many hormones but not progesterone and therefore one should never take it w/o a dose of pregnenolone as well from which progesterone can be made. I never found anywhere that said what dose of pregnenolone to take. I take 30mg. Both pregnenolone and DHEA are needed by the brain, even as is -- before they become any other hormone. The intelligent way to take hormones is to have a baseline hormone test to see where you are at and then 3 montsh after supplementing have another hormone test to see what your body is making of these hormones. It is well known that certain hormone metabolites are linked to cancer and a hormone test will tell you if you are making those. To see that, hopwever, you need to go to a good lab which will show you all the metabolites, not just the end products. The lab my doctor uses is excellent -- I can't remember the name right now but it has "Meridian" in the name. (6) Take lorts of anitoxidants to protect your body from glycation -- blood sugar is very deleterious. Also the more sugar and starch you eat the more you need B vitamins. B vitamins should be taken in concert -- not onezies and twozies, but all of them, as most work synergistically. They are water soluble and some of them, particularly B1, do not stay in the blood very long. It is for this reason that it is best to take smaller dose B vitamins complexes multiple times during the day. If you find, for instance, that you get blurry vision late in the day and do not have it in the morning, it is probably due to B1 deficiency. (7) The nerves do not need insulin to take up glucose...it just goes right into the nerve cells and turns into sorbitol which is hard to get rid of and damages the nerve cell. Nerves are coated with a myelin sheath, which is a fat, and taking antioxidants that are fat soluble can help protect it (E, alpha lipoic acid, for instance). That is why I said take all sorts of anti-oxidants above, not just water soluble ones. Diabetics are prone to neuropathies. See the B12 topic in this blog to learn about avoiding/helping neuropathies. They say, for instance, that B6, B12, and folic acid are important to avoiding neuropathies and many peocannot break these down at all or well, so need the pre broken down ("active") forms P5P, sublingual methylcobalamine&adenosylcobalamine, l-methylfolate. (8) Examine your supplements for those that raise or lower blood sugar which may be a problem for you. Of course if irt is a necessary supplement, it is a necessary supplement, but you need to know which raise/lower blood sugar so you can take evasive action. Many B vitamins raise blood sugar, in particular niacin, because it is used 3 times in the Kreb's cycle to bereak down glucose to produce energy (ATPs). I would not worry about that unless you propose to take an excessive amount (there are 1g/day niacin therapies for arthritis, for example). However one supplement which is very important to know about for people with blood sugar issues -- alpha-lipoic acid. In Germany they TREAT DIABETES with 600mg alpha-lipoic acid. Thus, if you have LOW blood sugar, it will take you down like you don't know what hit you! When I took 600 mg alpha-lipoic acid/day I got 3 low blood sugar attacks PER DAY. I can, however, tolerate 100mg alpha-lipoic acid/day. You have to be careful to find a dose you can tolerate if you take it. (9) When you get a low blood sugar attack, you lose enough potassium that it takes 6 bananas to replace it. This tip is from Adele Davis. I think you may lose other alkaline minerals besides...severe low blood sugar leaves acidic ketones in your blood and your body tries to neutralize anything acidic pulling alkaline minerals from either your diet or your bones. Dried apricots have 800 mg potassium per apricot and are handy to keep around. Find some high potassium food of your liking. Also I use cal/mag capsules (I uses Twinlabs calcium citrate/mag capsules as they are absorbed quickly and regardless of your stomach ph) to deacidify after a low blood sugar attack. The quicker you replace alkaline minerals the quicker you will recover. (Of course, I assume you know to raise your blood sugar first). I probably know a lot more things about this, but that's all I can think of right now. I hope it helps.
    madanthony 1087 Replies
    • February 17, 2010
    • 09:17 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Ok, I read all of this. Here is my version: I was on a very physical course, the Sunday it was about 43'C. The Monday morning we started with PT, temperatures already skyhigh...with full gear on. I was sweating profusely, taking fluids, but surely not enough. A few hours in, I collapsed, dehydrated, hyperventilating, heart palpitations...admitted to hospital with IV's given through the night. The Tuesday Im back, PT...etc. (lots of physical stuff). Temperature 50'C at 10:00am right through until past four pm. At 6 pm we started activities again. No sleep at night. What do I do? ----- I already replied regarding low blood sugar in this topic, but I will say here it really does sound like heat prostration. I used to get heat stroke every time I went out and got a lot of exercise in the summer w/o eating. Until I read a front page article in the Detroit News that said you have to eat something to prevent it. You said you were drinking, but not eating. You lose elecroyltes in sweat and blood sugar in exercise. I don't really know why the blood sugar is an issue but it is and as long as I eat something I am good. If you find that does not help, look at my low blood sugar post to see if something in there might help you, such as rhodiola.
    madanthony 1087 Replies
    • February 17, 2010
    • 09:30 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Try chia seeds! They can keep reactive hypoglycemia at bay by keeping blood sugar steady. 1 tablespoon can work for 24 hours for most people! Research it! All the best! I have energy all day as well!
    Anonymous 1 Replies
    • October 9, 2015
    • 00:09 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.