Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

pulsating/tingling sensations blue/red feet need suggestions

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 11 Replies
  • Posted By: wl138gr
  • November 23, 2008
  • 05:09 AM

I have a horrible dr and live out in the middle of nowhere and need help trying to figure out which type of dr I should go to. Everyone I've seen has dumped me as soon as the test came back normal.
I am now closing on 30 years of age. My symptoms started around 2003. I was in the shower I looked down and my feet were a dark blue/purple color. I'm not sure what my symptoms were leading up to that or how sudden it happened. I did have some strange bumps on my feet that were hard red and hurt when I touched them prior to that. Which I now believe were the warning signs that something was going wrong. Now my symptoms are
If I sit or stand in one place my feet slowly change to the blue/purple color starting at my toes and working all the way up past my knees. The time is not consistent and it happens much quicker sometime then others. My feet feel cold like they are in ice water my sense of touch diminishes then I begin to have a dull ache as it time goes on. When I walk they change back to normal.
If I exert myself like running or aerobic exercise or just walk to far they turn red and burn. I believe there is a small amount of swelling as it feels like it when I bend my toes. Stress and heat seem to make it happen quicker.
I have strange tingling/vibrating/pulsating sensations in my hands and feet.
I seem to be tired all the time.
I slur my words when I get tired and have brain ****s. This may just be insomnia and boredom or a symptom of whats wrong with me.
I have gone to a cardiologist and have no heart problems.
I have been to a rheumatologist who ran $2500 worth of blood testes and I have no connective tissue disorders and I don't have raynaud's disease.
I saw a vascular surgeon who just chased me away after feeling a strong pulse in all of my extremities.
I had a venous duplex and everything looked normal.
I do not have diabetes.
I have never had limb weakness.

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11 Replies:

  • I think you have 1 of 2 things going on.My first guess is bad blood circulation, so when you stand your joints are cutting off circulation to your feet, tingling feelings mean your nerves are reactivating after being pressured or having circulation cut off. It would also explain your tiredness and fatigue. The reason why your limbs get red and burn can be from the blood either being pooled by the force you are exerting and that causing allot of pressure in your blood vessels. Slured words can be a cause of lack of circulation to the brain that most commonly happens during high fatigue times like missing sleep.I think you just have hit the point where your body can't handle it.My second is I assume it's normal for a 30 year old who is not active or was not previously active. From what I read your body is not conditioned to handle being idle or stressed.I have bad circulation to where my body won't retain heat in my limbs, mainly my hands and feet, but changes in temperature can cause allot of pain from what feels like nerve freezing cold to skin boiling hot even though they are not that high or low temperature. washing my hands is a B***.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 05:24 AM
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  • Have you been checked for Multiple Sclerosis?The reason I ask is because I was diagnosed with MS in 2005. When I sit or stand for long periods of time, my feet also turn red than take on a bluish tint. This especially happens when I cross my legs while sitting. When walking for long periods of time, they become beet red often feeling like they are on fire. (This also happens to my dad who was diagnosed with Myopathy.) Lack of energy is a symptom of MS, as well. I get plenty of sleep, eat right, take medication (Provigil) for lack of energy, yet, I still feel like I haven't slept for days much of the time. "Brain ****s" are all to common for me as well. If I don't write things down, I most likely won't remember them 3-4 hours later. However, it only seems to be affecting my short term memory. Tingling and numbness in the limbs are major symptoms for MS. Stress and heat are the main causes of the symptoms as well in people with MS.I would try to see a Neurologist if possible. You may or may not have MS, but it sounds to me like a visit to a Neurologist is needed.Good luck and I do hope you find a doctor who can figure out what is going on.Kim
    BellyJeans 1 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 01:47 PM
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  • Hi there, You have insufficiency of the lymphatic vessels valves in your legs. Lymphography is suggested. The bumps that you have noted prior to your symptoms could have been viral infection that maybe damaged them.Take the homeopathic remedy vipera berus 30 c - 3 times a day under tongue 15 min before meal for 7 days. It might help a lot. Love, peace and joy, Dr B
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 01:49 PM
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  • Are you male or female? Do you have any signs of varicose veins in your legs?
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 02:59 PM
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  • Bellyjeans I've not been checked for ms. I tried to see the neurologist but the secretary threw me out when she found out I had medicade. I was not aware that it could make your feet change color so I will have to get that checked out. Thanks for the advice.
    wl138gr 8 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 10:20 PM
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  • dr b I think they checked my valves when they did the venius duplex and they said everything was in working order. They made me squeeze my stomach/bowl area and then relase while they had the ultrasound on my blood vessels and things appeared to be proper.
    wl138gr 8 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 10:21 PM
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  • felsen I'm male I have pronounced veins but the drs have made no comment on them. I think they stick out more on my arms then my legs which are affected less by this. I am thin and work out.
    wl138gr 8 Replies
    • November 23, 2008
    • 10:23 PM
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  • "My feet feel cold like they are in ice water my sense of touch diminishes then I begin to have a dull ache as it time goes on. When I walk they change back to normal."This means that there could be something wrong with your venous return, even though they say everything is fine. When you walk, the muscle pump drives the blood up. It also means that the suction force from the heart is not enough to move the blood upwards, when standing up. This can indicate that there is some kind of venous obstruction along the way. There is a condition called May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It dos not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain); most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg. If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. Another typical symptom is ambulating pain, the pain moves around depending on where the pressure is high at the moment. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only certain way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. About 30% of the patients are male. If left untreated, there is a big risk of thrombosis either at the compression site in the left common iliac vein or in the left leg. The second alternative is that you have somewhere a fistula between a vein and and artery, somewhere at the pelvis level. The vascular surgeon who sent you home after checking your pulses is a typical lazy one, who's only interested in arterial problems and denies that venous disease exists (I've seen many of those). Your strong pulse might actually indicate a fistula. You need a really good vascular sugeon interested in venous disease and who has IVUS. Where is "in the middle of nowhere"?
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • November 24, 2008
    • 00:35 AM
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  • felson the middle of nowhere is rural kentucky. I tried going to uk which was a very painful drive but no one seemed to care. They just kept sending me back to my gp who told me to go to the mayo clinic. Like I would have went to him in the first place if I could afford that. UK medical center is where the vascular surgon was. Which is unfortunetally supposed to be the best place in ky to go.
    wl138gr 8 Replies
    • November 25, 2008
    • 04:38 AM
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  • Well, Jackson, Miss is at least closer than Mayo. At Mayo there is dr Gloviczki. He would be able to sort things out, too, I’m sure. I am really sorry that you have wasted money on worthless lazy doctors, who shouldn’t have become doctors in the first place. Unfortunately most of us here have made the same mistake. Maybe you could contact Peter Neglén and tell him about your situation. Maybe you could work out some deal. He is Swedish and quite nice. He is doing a lot of research, so maybe he’ll be interested in taking a look at you anyway. I really wish I had a magic wand and could help you. Unfortunately I don’t. I wish you the best of luck. Please post again and tell us how it goes.
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • November 25, 2008
    • 01:58 PM
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  • I will and if I ever get an actual diagnosis I will make sure to post it.
    wl138gr 8 Replies
    • November 30, 2008
    • 05:02 AM
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