Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

pregnancy gone wrong-help

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 2 Replies
  • Posted By: goche21
  • January 26, 2008
  • 04:42 PM

I recently had my first child, and there were complications I'm fairly certain were avoidable. I don't have the money to see a physician for a second opinion, and I feel like the doctors aren't being truthful when they say they followed procedure and did everything possible.

What happened was, a few days before my due date the doctor told me I'd have to be induced, because holding a baby over the due date is dangerous and could cause complications. I went in for induction three days after the due date, but it was put on hold due to hypokalemia. My levels of potassium were at 2.1, and the doctor didn't want to risk cardiac arrest if I had to have a c-section. Four days later, after IV's and suppliments it peaked at 3.3 or so, and I was rushed back to be induced without waiting to see if it would stabalize. They started the pitocin, broke my water, and the baby went into fetal destress. I had to have a c-section, which went fine and my daughter was healthy, but I hemorrhaged. They couldn't stop the bleeding and decided after about 20 minutes and two units of blood, to do a hysterectemy. ((the kind of hemorrhage I had was caused by the uterous refucing to contract at all, even after 5 different drugs, and a uterous massage))

The doctors say I have a neuromuscular disease of the smooth muscles, but I can't find a single one that fits my symptoms. It almost fits with Chlorostasis in pregnancy, except that my daughter was born healthy and it doesn't explain the hypokalemia.

Reply Flag this Discussion

2 Replies:

  • Can't anyone help me?Here's more info, please, I need answers.I have a family history of hemorrhaging in labor. My grandmother ((adopted so I don't know anything past her)) and my aunt on my moms side of the family both did, but their bleeding stopped. Neigther me or my doctor knew about this. Family history of heart problems, diabetes (type two), and high blood pressure. My birth was unusual, I was born with Neonatal polycythemia, and needed to have a transufion to thin my blood out. I'm anemic. Don't know if this is anything, but locking joints. Both my pinky fingers and big toes have popped painfuly every time I close them for as long as I can remember. Sense the surgery my knee has been doing the same thing. Lots of chest, stomach, and back pain, starting halfway through the pregnancy. Feels like I'll have trouble breathing, but blood pressure and heart rate normal. EKG normal. Dizziness/lightheadedness. Muscle weakness poor coorodination poor memory poor concentration excema allergies Blood pressure normal
    goche21 4 Replies
    • February 2, 2008
    • 07:10 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Hello, I am by no means a professional, however I do have a certificate in health sciences and am currently going to medical school and am very good at research. I think I might have found your problem.**Note to reader, pay attention to bolded items as they have importance**You stated that your birth was abnormal and that you have Neonatal Polycythemia. Polycythemia is something that stays with a person throughout their entire life. Polycythemia is a disease and is something that tends to come back when a person who had it as an infant becomes pregnant again. Some of the symptoms of polycythemia are as follows: headaches, weakness, dizziness , and/or a ringing noise in the ear. In some cases, individuals with polycythemia experience itching (pruritis), especially after a hot bath. Affected individuals often have an abnormally enlarged spleen and/or liver. Affected individuals may have associated conditions including high blood pressure (hypertension), the formation of blood clots (thrombosis), and rupturing of and loss of blood (hemorrhaging) You stated that during the pregnancy the doctors gave you Pitocen. Pitocin is indicated for the initiation or improvement of uterine contractions, in order to achieve vaginal delivery.You also stated you had a condition called Hypokalemia. Hypokalemia is a condition of below normal levels of potassium in the blood serum. The normal concentration of potassium in the serum is in the range of 3.5-5.0 mM. Hypokalemia means serum or plasma levels of potassium ions that fall below 3.5 mM. Hypokalemia can result from two general causes: either from an overall depletion in the body's potassium or from excessive uptake of potassium by muscle from surrounding fluids.What were the fluids they gave you? Were these fluids the wrong fluids? Could they have increased Hypokalemia in your body? They should not have rushed you into the C-Section when your Potassium was increasing back to normal level. These are just some things I wanted to cover.Hypokalemia is most commonly caused by the use of diuretics. Diuretics are drugs that increase the excretion of water and salts in the urine. Diuretics are used to treat a number of medical conditions, including hypertension (high blood pressure), congestive heart failure, liver disease, and kidney disease. However, diuretic treatment can have the side effect of producing hypokalemia. In fact, the most common cause of hypokalemia in the elderly is the use of diuretics. The use of furosemide and thiazide, two commonly used diuretic drugs, can lead to hypokalemia. Some other causes of Hypokalemia are vomiting and diareah. You did not state that you had these, but did you? This could have caused it if so.Another thing, you probably were having trouble contracting your uterus because of your hypokalemia. hypokalemia is the cause of lack of pottasium. You need potassium in your body to control muscles. The utuerus is a muscle.Laslty, you stated that your symptoms sounded like Cholestasis of Pregnancy. I would not doubt this, simply because of your syptoms and your family history. Cholestasis of pregnancy causes many different symptoms for many people, however the most common one is an itchy rash caused from the liver not functioning properly. What causes Cholestasis of pregnancy? Pregnancy hormones affect gallbladder function, resulting in slowing or stopping the flow of bile. The gallbladder holds bile that is produced in the liver, which is necessary in the breakdown of fats in digestion. When the bile flow is stopped or slowed down, this causes a build up of bile acids in the liver which can spill into the bloodstream. What are the symptoms of Cholestasis of pregnancy? Itching, particularly on the hands and feet (often is the only symptom noticed)Dark urine color Light coloring of bowel movementsFatigue or exhaustion Loss of appetite DepressionLess common symptoms include: Jaundice (yellow coloring of skin, eyes, and mucous membranes) Upper-Right Quadrant Pain NauseaDid you have any of these symptoms? The one that seems most alarming is the fact that you mentioned that all the problems you mentioned seemed to be related to LIVER problems. Do I doubt that these all are connected? No, but do I think that you have Cholestasis of pregnancy No. I think the symptoms you experienced were from your Hypokalemia and Polycythemia. I think that the doctors should have considered the fact that you were low on potassium and the fact that you werent having contractions might be due to this, also did they check your family history? Polycythemia causes hemmoraging. Do I think you should of had a C-Section? No, not unless they had a fetal moniter on you and had probable reason to do one because the baby was in distress. Do I think that they had the right to do one? No, because you couldnt possibly have contractions with low pottasium because your muscles are not functioning. Do I think that they should have taken your uterus? No, I do not. The uterus is a females organ and once they take it, you no longer can have children. Do I agree the doctors made the right decisions all together? No.My Advice to you: Research your conditions more. Go back to the doctors, get documents during your birthing to your daughter. If needed, hire a lawyer and file a formal complaint and lawsuit against them. Lastly, Trust your instinct next time and get a second opinion.Links:http://www.americanpregnancy.org/pregnancycomplications/cholestasispregnancy.htmlhttp://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/common/standard/transform.jsp?requestURI=/healthatoz/Atoz/ency/hypokalemia.jsphttp://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/oxytocin_ids.htmhttp://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec18/ch261/ch261h.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polycythemia
    Adriesse07 41 Replies
    • February 2, 2008
    • 00:12 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.

Signs of a Psoriasis Flare

Know the five types of psoriasis and how to spot flares.

How Diabetes Medications Affect Your Appetite

Newer diabetes treatments can suppress appetite and aid weight loss.

What to Do For Dry Mouth

Try these tips to get your salivary glands back into action.

The Painkiller – Constipation Connection

Constipation is a common side effect of opioid and narcotic pain medicines.

9 Signs of Sensitive Skin

Is it sensitive skin or something else?