Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Please help me figure this out.

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Notfeelingtoohot
  • August 29, 2009
  • 07:03 AM

I am 21 Years old about to be 22 very soon.
About 6 Months ago I started feeling that my elbows weren't feeling as smooth as in they felt like gears popping into place the whole movement down and up.(Kind of hard to explain). Also my right hand's fingers hurt and my hand shakes lightly when I do anything tedious on the computer. For example playing a game. After a little while like a few weeks my legs felt weak and felt like my movements were very awkward; it felt that way to me but when I asked anyone they said it looked fine. My legs felt fatigued faster as if i just sprinted 100m. Then these symptoms started to get worse little by little. It feels weird to reach out to grab anything. Like trying to reach out to pick something up with a fork across the table. Movement doesn't feel smooth at all like it is an airplane going to a storm have way.

My arms elbows and fingers feel like they something lock in place and is hard to move them. Although I can but is a lot harder than before. I get a weird feeling of something touching the bones in my forearms. Sometimes it feels slightly tingly.

Now new syptoms started to appear. Somethings I'm having difficulty saying a sentence, as if my first part of the sentence feels like the end of a very long sentence when you have run out of breathe and forcing the last bit out. Sometimes I feel Light headed when this happens (when I force myself to talk even though this happens). Sometimes there's a feeling of pressure in my chest.

I have been to my primary doctor who told me this could be early Parkinsons or geon barre. Which i researched and don't think is the class. He referred me to the neurological department in a general hospital. I have been there 4 times, all four times they have told me that I'm fine. They did 3 blood tests and everything came back normal. I have requested MRIs but they won't give it to me. I have 1 appointment with another doctor and an neurologist in the following weeks.

For Sure I know its not my Thyroid cause they checked that.

The few things I looked at is:

Arthritis. But I don't know if it gives the feeling of chest pressure and speech problem.

Carpal Tunnel. But same thing I don't know if it matches the other symptoms.

MS. A friend of mine has MS and seems to have through a few of my symptoms but not all of them and I haven't had all his symptoms. And my Vision is fine.

Anxiety. Could this be it? I talked to a nurse on the phone when the speech and chest pressure first occurred and she immediately said anxiety. Told me to exercise, do breathing exercises, ride my bike, do Yoga. I been doing 3 of the 4 and it doesn't seem to have improved anything. I been doing them for about a week: Breathing exercise(4-7-8 count). Playing Basketball, Stretching as much as possible 2-3 times a day.

I know that the doctors said there was nothing wrong with me, but I don't feel that way. My hands hurt when i do things, they don't seem as steady anymore. Chest pressure, Nashua, funky feeling when walking, having a weird feeling in arms doing the simplest things.

Please help guys. I fear it's getting worse.
Thanks for reading.

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3 Replies:

  • Okay, while there are rare instances in which an early-onset Parkinson's disease can manifest in younger persons, it is highly unlikely to be the case in a 21 year-old individual. Additionally, the symptom characterization is unlike the presentation seen in such instances. Gillain Barre is an autoimmune disorder that affects the peripheral nerves, with onset most often occurring in the lower extremities and advancing upward as damage progresses. Again, I don't see it as a potential candidate in your case. The reason that the nurse suggested anxiety is that many people who suffer from intense anxiety capable of producing somatic or physical symptoms, generally breathe very shallow among other tendencies without awareness. This can produce mild changes in blood gas concentrations over time and cause the affected individual to feel breathless in the absence of exertion. It can also make the chest feel tight or difficult to expand naturally, resulting in a sort of erratic muscular response when attempting to do so. Breath sounds can even amplify this muscular response. Additionally, light-headedness often occurs and is sort of like a mild state of hyperventilation. People afflicted with anxiety often claim that they feel as though they are starved for air. Whether or not this generally fits the pattern of symptoms you've been experiencing, the fact that you have been playing very active sports would demonstrate endurance and absence of any type of respiratory compromise. People under intense anxiety can also form tendonitis and often exclaim that their tendons feel too short as a consequence of experiencing pain and burning sensations when outstretching the arms or clenching their hands on extreme arm extension. Similar complaints are heard concerning the legs. Pain is often experienced at the forearms and tenderness is observed when palpating or pressing on the outer forearm over the compartment where major tendons pass through to the wrist and hand. Also of note with this type of tendonitis is early fatigue. Patients readily complain that their grip weakens prematurely or their hands ache or throb while trying to perform intricate work, requiring contiunal pause to stretch and flex the fingers and hands. Physiologic tremor can often occur as a consequence of anxiety and is usually enhanced on extension of the arms or legs. It is often difficult to see at rest but placing a sheet of paper over the hands will usually reveal a slight, fine tremor amplified in the paper. It is not a sign of neurological disease and can also be caused by certain medications. The sensation of pressure in the chest and nausea are also symptoms or complaints often encountered in the patient with anxiety. I see nothing of your symptoms to suggest the presence of any imminent disease or life-threatening course. If you are able to recognize any patterns of change in your personal life, ie loss of a loved one, divorce or separation, new job or loss of a job, relocation to a new city or state, then all of these major life changes can produce anixety capable of demonstrating physical symptoms as a consequence. Realize that persons with anxiety often become fearful that something dreadful may be taking place, which only elevates the anxiety even further and causes the symptoms to increase in intensity or causes new symptoms to appear. The fact that you've undergone tests which would reveal the presence of significant concerns if they were present, which are all negative, would conclude that anxiety should be considered among the causative factors. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • August 29, 2009
    • 00:27 PM
    • 0
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  • Okay, while there are rare instances in which an early-onset Parkinson's disease can manifest in younger persons, it is highly unlikely to be the case in a 21 year-old individual. Additionally, the symptom characterization is unlike the presentation seen in such instances. Gillain Barre is an autoimmune disorder that affects the peripheral nerves, with onset most often occurring in the lower extremities and advancing upward as damage progresses. Again, I don't see it as a potential candidate in your case. The reason that the nurse suggested anxiety is that many people who suffer from intense anxiety capable of producing somatic or physical symptoms, generally breathe very shallow among other tendencies without awareness. This can produce mild changes in blood gas concentrations over time and cause the affected individual to feel breathless in the absence of exertion. It can also make the chest feel tight or difficult to expand naturally, resulting in a sort of erratic muscular response when attempting to do so. Breath sounds can even amplify this muscular response. Additionally, light-headedness often occurs and is sort of like a mild state of hyperventilation. People afflicted with anxiety often claim that they feel as though they are starved for air. Whether or not this generally fits the pattern of symptoms you've been experiencing, the fact that you have been playing very active sports would demonstrate endurance and absence of any type of respiratory compromise. People under intense anxiety can also form tendonitis and often exclaim that their tendons feel too short as a consequence of experiencing pain and burning sensations when outstretching the arms or clenching their hands on extreme arm extension. Similar complaints are heard concerning the legs. Pain is often experienced at the forearms and tenderness is observed when palpating or pressing on the outer forearm over the compartment where major tendons pass through to the wrist and hand. Also of note with this type of tendonitis is early fatigue. Patients readily complain that their grip weakens prematurely or their hands ache or throb while trying to perform intricate work, requiring contiunal pause to stretch and flex the fingers and hands. Physiologic tremor can often occur as a consequence of anxiety and is usually enhanced on extension of the arms or legs. It is often difficult to see at rest but placing a sheet of paper over the hands will usually reveal a slight, fine tremor amplified in the paper. It is not a sign of neurological disease and can also be caused by certain medications. The sensation of pressure in the chest and nausea are also symptoms or complaints often encountered in the patient with anxiety. I see nothing of your symptoms to suggest the presence of any imminent disease or life-threatening course. If you are able to recognize any patterns of change in your personal life, ie loss of a loved one, divorce or separation, new job or loss of a job, relocation to a new city or state, then all of these major life changes can produce anixety capable of demonstrating physical symptoms as a consequence. Realize that persons with anxiety often become fearful that something dreadful may be taking place, which only elevates the anxiety even further and causes the symptoms to increase in intensity or causes new symptoms to appear. The fact that you've undergone tests which would reveal the presence of significant concerns if they were present, which are all negative, would conclude that anxiety should be considered among the causative factors. Best regards, J Cottle, MDThanks for response JCottle. Anxiety was my bet too. I did a bit of research on anxiety and it seems that it happens in spasms where people have attacks but my symptoms are always there and is consistent there aren't any times where they get extremely worse. I haven't had any emotional roller coasters like losing job, moving.. etc etc. I been riding my bike, playing sports, going to the gym, doing breathing exercises. My job is an active one with a lot of great people. and my symptoms haven't gotten any better. Is there anything else I should be doing? Should I give it more time?
    Notfeelingtoohot 2 Replies
    • August 30, 2009
    • 04:37 AM
    • 0
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  • Update: I think it might be it is anxiety. Today while eating with my sister and brother I felt very out of it. I didn't feel hungry even though I haven't eaten for at least 18 hrs. I felt unsteady, felt like throwing up, felt insecure, I felt nervous... I mean wtf.. this is my family.. Someone tell me what to do, I need help. My doctors appointment isn't for another month and this is the only place i found that could be helpful.Thanks.
    Notfeelingtoohot 2 Replies
    • August 31, 2009
    • 09:41 PM
    • 0
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