Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Persistent skin sores

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 9 Replies
  • Posted By: Kenny B
  • April 3, 2008
  • 02:52 AM

I am in my 30s and have been dealing with persitent and aggravating skin sores for about 3 years. I never had any significant acne problems when I was younger. I was diagnosed by doctors as having imputago or filliculitis. I have been told by a dermatologist that if I stopped picking the sores, they would go away within 2 weeks. A number of times they have disappeared for up to 6 weeks, but always come back. Some of the sores have a white ulcerated look and all of them take much longer than the average acne sore to heal. As well, they tend to bleed a lot if picked and emit an odd odour. I also have noticed that sometimes I can see small red spots under my skin. At times, I feel very fatigued but am still able to play sports etc. Any ideas or advice would be appreciated.

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9 Replies:

  • I am in my 30s and have been dealing with persitent and aggravating skin sores for about 3 years. I never had any significant acne problems when I was younger. I was diagnosed by doctors as having imputago or filliculitis. I have been told by a dermatologist that if I stopped picking the sores, they would go away within 2 weeks. A number of times they have disappeared for up to 6 weeks, but always come back. Some of the sores have a white ulcerated look and all of them take much longer than the average acne sore to heal. As well, they tend to bleed a lot if picked and emit an odd odour. I also have noticed that sometimes I can see small red spots under my skin. At times, I feel very fatigued but am still able to play sports etc. Any ideas or advice would be appreciated. ask your doctor to take samples from the sores to test for herpes
    carnivore 23 Replies Flag this Response
  • They probably need to scrap one and check for mrsa.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies Flag this Response
  • get checked for syphilis, too..
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies Flag this Response
  • They probably need to scrap one and check for mrsa.over exadurating a bit aren't you? if it was syphilis or MRSA the person would be dead 3 years ago. 3 years of skin sores sounds like herpes, if that's not the case it can't be anything serious.
    carnivore 23 Replies Flag this Response
  • Wow. Syphilis? You're tough on people.hahaha yes compleatly. MRSA or syhilis the person with 3 years of skin sores would of been dead 3 years ago... sounds like herpes or poor immune system, if that's not it, then it can't be anything serious. what do you think?
    carnivore 23 Replies Flag this Response
  • now how would you know if they don't have lab work??? I like to explore all that it might be and what a doctor may overlook. Yes, it could be syphilis, second stage.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies Flag this Response
  • now how would you know if they don't have lab work??? I like to explore all that it might be and what a doctor may overlook. Yes, it could be syphilis, second stage.saying it's possibly syhilis is gonna get the person who posted the thread worked up which is why I'm ruling it out with facts. the person, after 3 years, would be dead now if it was syphilis, and trust me, he would get a ***l of a lot more symptoms than JUST sores. syphilis isn't even that common, maybe back in the year 1400 it was, but not now. i learnt about syphilis is history classes and was told ALL about it. this guy doesn't have shyphilis, nor does he have MRSA. He'd be dead well by now from MRSA with plenty more symptoms! ;)
    carnivore 23 Replies Flag this Response
  • He might not have it but he won't know until he is checked. You can live with syphilis for decades and not get diagnosed. There are other conditions that would cause skin sores and he needs to have them analyzed. The doctors don't seem to be concerned and think it is minor, however, his general weakness and smell of the sores warrants some blood work and further investigation to rule out anything more serious than impetigo with constant picking at it. He needs to see a doctor for further treatment. FYI http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/STDFact-Syphilis.htm How Common is Syphilis? In the United States, health officials reported over 36,000 cases of syphilis in 2006, including 9,756 cases of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis. In 2006, half of all P&S syphilis cases were reported from 20 counties and 2 cities; and most P&S syphilis cases occurred in persons 20 to 39 years of age. The incidence of P&S syphilis was highest in women 20 to 24 years of age and in men 35 to 39 years of age. Reported cases of congenital syphilis in newborns increased from 2005 to 2006, with 339 new cases reported in 2005 compared to 349 cases in 2006.Between 2005 and 2006, the number of reported P&S syphilis cases increased 11.8 percent. P&S rates have increased in males each year between 2000 and 2006 from 2.6 to 5.7 and among females between 2004 and 2006. In 2006, 64% of the reported P&S syphilis cases were among men who have sex with men (MSM). Secondary StageSkin rash and mucous membrane lesions characterize the secondary stage. This stage typically starts with the development of a rash on one or more areas of the body. The rash usually does not cause itching. Rashes associated with secondary syphilis can appear as the chancre is healing or several weeks after the chancre has healed. The characteristic rash of secondary syphilis may appear as rough, red, or reddish brown spots both on the palms of the hands and the bottoms of the feet. However, rashes with a different appearance may occur on other parts of the body, sometimes resembling rashes caused by other diseases. Sometimes rashes associated with secondary syphilis are so faint that they are not noticed. In addition to rashes, symptoms of secondary syphilis may include fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, and fatigue. The signs and symptoms of secondary syphilis will resolve with or without treatment, but without treatment, the infection will progress to the latent and possibly late stages of disease.Late and Latent StagesThe latent (hidden) stage of syphilis begins when primary and secondary symptoms disappear. Without treatment, the infected person will continue to have syphilis even though there are no signs or symptoms; infection remains in the body. This latent stage can last for years. The late stages of syphilis can develop in about 15% of people who have not been treated for syphilis, and can appear 10 – 20 years after infection was first acquired. In the late stages of syphilis, the disease may subsequently damage the internal organs, including the brain, nerves, eyes, heart, blood vessels, liver, bones, and joints. Signs and symptoms of the late stage of syphilis include difficulty coordinating muscle movements, paralysis, numbness, gradual blindness, and dementia. This damage may be serious enough to cause death.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have has several skin sores as well over the past several years and finally started loosing eyesight and was finally confrmed I has syphilis. I read your replies and maybe you should do a bit more research before you give opinion.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 24, 2009
    • 02:11 AM
    • 0
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