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periodontal case

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 4 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • March 7, 2011
  • 05:43 PM

i have a 60 years old patient who presented at the dental clinic with mobile lower anterior t6eeth he is diabetic and has been a smoker for 40 years. whats the treatment

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  • i have a 60 years old patient who presented at the dental clinic with mobile lower anterior t6eeth he is diabetic and has been a smoker for 40 years. whats the treatmenti am not a dentist and I never knew anyone with mobile teeth, but for GENERAL PERIODONTAL issues, CoQ10 is indicated -- 200 mg. Smoking increases cadmium, which prevents copper absorption (this will not show up in serum copper, which is raised in the case of any infection and also laxative use, medication use, etc -- it will only show up in hair analysis at a reputable lab which does not wash the hair sample - such as www.traceelements.com (there are others), or liver biopsy -- basically copper is stolen from other critical areas to put in the blood to fight infection so serum copper is reactive and unreliable). Low copper is linked to osteoporosis, which will affect the teeth. For example, see: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=5154620or do your own search -- there are many studies which show copper deficiency causes osteoporosis. To chelate cadmium, selenium is requred plus cessation of smoking. For instance: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7924657Also, it takes adequate boron to adequately absorb copper. One of the greatest effects of cadmium is that it depletes selenium in the body because selenium is essential for cadmium removal. Selenium atoms combine with cadmium atoms and are escorted out of the body via the bile system. When selenium is depleted by cadmium, there is less selenium to form the deiodinase enzymes which convert T4 to T3, resulting in low T3 and hypothyroidism. Also there is less selenium to form glutathione peroxidase, one of the body's prime antioxidants. This results in greater levels of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide. Title cadmium poisoning]Author Long M; Zhao J; Wang S Address Department of Preventive Medicine, Guiyang Medical College, Guizhou. Source Chung Hua Yu Fang I Hsueh Tsa Chih, 32(2):73-5 1998 Mar Abstract OBJECTIVE: To understand the possible role of trace elements in renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning and its mechanism. METHODS: An experimental animal model with renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning was prepared, and trace elements contents in subcellular components in renal cells, lipid peroxidation reaction, renal function and its ultrastructural changes were determined. RESULTS: Uptake of cadmium could cause transfer of copper, zinc and manganese mainly distributed in the mitochondrion to cell nuclei and cytoplasm, and content of selenium and activity of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-px) in cytosol declined and content of propandiolal increased. CONCLUSION: It suggests that changes in trace elements contents, especially in selenium content, during renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning, could correlate with the increase of lipid peroxidation, and abnormal subcellular distribution of trace elements was one of the important roles in renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning. The following two studies demonstrate the protective effect of selenium against cadmium toxicity.Title cadmium toxicity and metallothionein] Author Ohta H; Imamiya S; Yoshikawa H Address Department of Health Administration, School of Hygenic Sciences, Kitasato University. Source Sangyo Igaku, 30(6):451-8 1988 Nov Abstract The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective action of simultaneous selenium administration against acute cadmium toxicity. The remarkable testicular damages caused by cadmium, that is, hemorrhagic inflammation, atrophy and necrosis, were lessened by simultaneous selenium administration. Cadmium concentration in blood, especially in plasma, increased significantly during the early period after cadmium administration with selenium. Cadmium and selenium in plasma were found in the same fractions of high molecular weight reported by previous workers as the high molecular weight complex containing cadmium and selenium. Cadmium in testis was also noted in the high molecular weight fraction during the early period. However, cadmium in the high molecular weight fraction of plasma and testis were unstable and decreased rapidly by lapse in time. Cadmium concentration in liver was lower than that in the group administered cadmium alone during the increasing phase of plasma cadmium. However, in contrast with the decreased cadmium level in plasma, cadmium in liver and testis increased gradually. Cadmium increased in liver and testis were also found in the metallothionein fraction. In the testis protected from acute cadmium toxicity, the inhibitory effect of glutathione S-transferase activity by cadmium was not detectable and the activity was maintained at the level of the control (saline administered group). Moreover, the increased cadmium in the metallothionein fraction was related to the decrease of cadmium in the high molecular weight fraction of the testis homogenate. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between metallothionein concentration and glutathione S-transferase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Biometals 1999 Dec;12(4):353-9Cadmium induced lipid peroxidation in rat testes and protection by selenium.Yiin SJ, Chern CL, Sheu JY, Lin THGraduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan.The main goal of this study was to investigate the role of cadmium in the promotion of lipid peroxidation in the homogenates of rat testes and the effect of selenium on lipid peroxidation in testes of rats after cadmium injection. Treatment of rats with cadmium resulted in a time- and dose-related accumulation of the metal ions in testes. The concentrations of cadmium, copper, zinc, selenium and iron in the tissues were determined by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and lipid peroxidation in testes was measured by a spectrophotometer. Cadmium produced enhanced lipid peroxidation in testes. These cadmium-induced changes were accompanied by a significant increase of iron and copper, and a decrease of zinc in testes. Concurrent treatment with selenium and cadmium reduced the cadmium-induced alterations in lipid peroxidation and essential metal levels. Data suggest that lipid peroxidation was associated with cadmium toxicity in testes and that the addition of selenium was found to be effective in attenuation of this effect. As to diabetes, it is a disease of acidity in the blood and this acidity must be counteracted or calcium will be robbed from the bones. Worse, most diabetics are low in Vitamin D, which should be checked for. Summary: CoQ10-200mg. Selenium plus cessation of smoking plus boron followed by hair analysis at reputable lab to ascertain if copper supplementation is required (cadmium displaces coppper so getting rid of the cadmium may be enough). Careful control of blood sugar, a test for Vitamin D levels (should be close to 70), use of calcium-magnesium supplements in a 2:1 ratio, and an emphasis on getting more vegetables in the diet for potassium, would be a basic start. Lastly, and most importantly, is the use of antioxidants as many of these disease processes raise oxidant levels, which will certainly affect the gums. For a start, C, E, and omega-3 should be taken to reduce inflammation due to oxidants (omega-3 1 tablespoon or 9 grams has a significant effect on lowering inflammatory cytokines).
    madanthony 1087 Replies Flag this Response
  • i am not a dentist and I never knew anyone with mobile teeth, but for GENERAL PERIODONTAL issues, CoQ10 is indicated -- 200 mg. Smoking increases cadmium, which prevents copper absorption (this will not show up in serum copper, which is raised in the case of any infection and also laxative use, medication use, etc -- it will only show up in hair analysis at a reputable lab which does not wash the hair sample - such as www.traceelements.com (there are others), or liver biopsy -- basically copper is stolen from other critical areas to put in the blood to fight infection so serum copper is reactive and unreliable). Low copper is linked to osteoporosis, which will affect the teeth. For example, see: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=5154620or do your own search -- there are many studies which show copper deficiency causes osteoporosis. To chelate cadmium, selenium is requred plus cessation of smoking. For instance: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7924657Also, it takes adequate boron to adequately absorb copper. One of the greatest effects of cadmium is that it depletes selenium in the body because selenium is essential for cadmium removal. Selenium atoms combine with cadmium atoms and are escorted out of the body via the bile system. When selenium is depleted by cadmium, there is less selenium to form the deiodinase enzymes which convert T4 to T3, resulting in low T3 and hypothyroidism. Also there is less selenium to form glutathione peroxidase, one of the body's prime antioxidants. This results in greater levels of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide. Title cadmium poisoning]Author Long M; Zhao J; Wang S Address Department of Preventive Medicine, Guiyang Medical College, Guizhou. Source Chung Hua Yu Fang I Hsueh Tsa Chih, 32(2):73-5 1998 Mar Abstract OBJECTIVE: To understand the possible role of trace elements in renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning and its mechanism. METHODS: An experimental animal model with renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning was prepared, and trace elements contents in subcellular components in renal cells, lipid peroxidation reaction, renal function and its ultrastructural changes were determined. RESULTS: Uptake of cadmium could cause transfer of copper, zinc and manganese mainly distributed in the mitochondrion to cell nuclei and cytoplasm, and content of selenium and activity of glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-px) in cytosol declined and content of propandiolal increased. CONCLUSION: It suggests that changes in trace elements contents, especially in selenium content, during renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning, could correlate with the increase of lipid peroxidation, and abnormal subcellular distribution of trace elements was one of the important roles in renal damage caused by cadmium poisoning. The following two studies demonstrate the protective effect of selenium against cadmium toxicity.Title cadmium toxicity and metallothionein] Author Ohta H; Imamiya S; Yoshikawa H Address Department of Health Administration, School of Hygenic Sciences, Kitasato University. Source Sangyo Igaku, 30(6):451-8 1988 Nov Abstract The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective action of simultaneous selenium administration against acute cadmium toxicity. The remarkable testicular damages caused by cadmium, that is, hemorrhagic inflammation, atrophy and necrosis, were lessened by simultaneous selenium administration. Cadmium concentration in blood, especially in plasma, increased significantly during the early period after cadmium administration with selenium. Cadmium and selenium in plasma were found in the same fractions of high molecular weight reported by previous workers as the high molecular weight complex containing cadmium and selenium. Cadmium in testis was also noted in the high molecular weight fraction during the early period. However, cadmium in the high molecular weight fraction of plasma and testis were unstable and decreased rapidly by lapse in time. Cadmium concentration in liver was lower than that in the group administered cadmium alone during the increasing phase of plasma cadmium. However, in contrast with the decreased cadmium level in plasma, cadmium in liver and testis increased gradually. Cadmium increased in liver and testis were also found in the metallothionein fraction. In the testis protected from acute cadmium toxicity, the inhibitory effect of glutathione S-transferase activity by cadmium was not detectable and the activity was maintained at the level of the control (saline administered group). Moreover, the increased cadmium in the metallothionein fraction was related to the decrease of cadmium in the high molecular weight fraction of the testis homogenate. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between metallothionein concentration and glutathione S-transferase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Biometals 1999 Dec;12(4):353-9Cadmium induced lipid peroxidation in rat testes and protection by selenium. Yiin SJ, Chern CL, Sheu JY, Lin TH Graduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan. The main goal of this study was to investigate the role of cadmium in the promotion of lipid peroxidation in the homogenates of rat testes and the effect of selenium on lipid peroxidation in testes of rats after cadmium injection. Treatment of rats with cadmium resulted in a time- and dose-related accumulation of the metal ions in testes. The concentrations of cadmium, copper, zinc, selenium and iron in the tissues were determined by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and lipid peroxidation in testes was measured by a spectrophotometer. Cadmium produced enhanced lipid peroxidation in testes. These cadmium-induced changes were accompanied by a significant increase of iron and copper, and a decrease of zinc in testes. Concurrent treatment with selenium and cadmium reduced the cadmium-induced alterations in lipid peroxidation and essential metal levels. Data suggest that lipid peroxidation was associated with cadmium toxicity in testes and that the addition of selenium was found to be effective in attenuation of this effect. As to diabetes, it is a disease of acidity in the blood and this acidity must be counteracted or calcium will be robbed from the bones. Worse, most diabetics are low in Vitamin D, which should be checked for. Summary: CoQ10-200mg. Selenium plus cessation of smoking plus boron followed by hair analysis at reputable lab to ascertain if copper supplementation is required (cadmium displaces coppper so getting rid of the cadmium may be enough). Careful control of blood sugar, a test for Vitamin D levels (should be close to 70), use of calcium-magnesium supplements in a 2:1 ratio, and an emphasis on getting more vegetables in the diet for potassium, would be a basic start. Lastly, and most importantly, is the use of antioxidants as many of these disease processes raise oxidant levels, which will certainly affect the gums. For a start, C, E, and omega-3 should be taken to reduce inflammation due to oxidants (omega-3 1 tablespoon or 9 grams has a significant effect on lowering inflammatory cytokines). A whole paragraph was somehow deleted above in which I said diabetics are often low in Vitamin D and diabetes is a disease of acidity in the blood so adequate D and alkaline minerals are important. Also many of the above disease processes result in the formation of oxidants so anti-oxidants are of and anti-inflammatory. Alsi I meant to say that a calcium magnesium supplement should be in a 1:1 ratio, such as by Soloray and do not use calcium carbonate since it is only 5% absorbable and requires no impairment os HCL production to absorb.
    madanthony 1087 Replies Flag this Response
  • A whole paragraph was somehow deleted above in which I said diabetics are often low in Vitamin D and diabetes is a disease of acidity in the blood so adequate D and alkaline minerals are important. Also many of the above disease processes result in the formation of oxidants so anti-oxidants are of and anti-inflammatory. Alsi I meant to say that a calcium magnesium supplement should be in a 1:1 ratio, such as by Soloray and do not use calcium carbonate since it is only 5% absorbable and requires no impairment os HCL production to absorb.Arghgh! This website cannot keep up with my typing speed and does notaccept type-ahead! Sorry!
    madanthony 1087 Replies Flag this Response
  • Arghgh! This website cannot keep up with my typing speed and does notaccept type-ahead! Sorry!hey, lastly - this is way out of the bailiwick of a dentist, but studies are showing diabetes is linked to low testosterone in men. testosterone replacement could fix him right up.
    madanthony 1087 Replies Flag this Response
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