Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Per doc, "I'm stumped"

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 7 Replies
  • Posted By: 4schnookie
  • October 1, 2007
  • 06:26 PM

44 yo woman, presented to ER with jaundice, no fever, increased bilirubin. CT scan showed normal stomach organs. Liver normal size. No CBC or chem tests run. Admitted to hosp. After three days in hospital, sent home with no instructions, diet etc. Doc was assuming was Hep A. Hep A, B returned as negative. Now Hep C ordered. While at home, clotting time and bili ordered. Clotting time normal. Bili elevated. Patient starting to lose weight due to nausea and lack of appetite. Jaundice now covers 100% of body. Followup with primary MD resulted in "I don't know what's wrong, I'm stumped." Patient has appt with gastro MD.
Question -- ? gallstones in common bile duct ? Wouldn't stones have shown up on original CT scan? If Hep C returns as negative, where to then? My understanding is that you cannot contact Hep C without having contacting Hep B.
Any chair-side advice would be welcome. Thanks!!

Reply Flag this Discussion

7 Replies:

  • Find NAET or Bioset therapy locally and go. Western med doesn't have a handle on these things...does this site give you a clue? best wishes...mommy cat
    mommy cat 1654 Replies
    • October 1, 2007
    • 10:09 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • 44 yo woman, presented to ER with jaundice, no fever, increased bilirubin. CT scan showed normal stomach organs. Liver normal size. No CBC or chem tests run. Admitted to hosp. After three days in hospital, sent home with no instructions, diet etc. Doc was assuming was Hep A. Hep A, B returned as negative. Now Hep C ordered. While at home, clotting time and bili ordered. Clotting time normal. Bili elevated. Patient starting to lose weight due to nausea and lack of appetite. Jaundice now covers 100% of body. Followup with primary MD resulted in "I don't know what's wrong, I'm stumped." Patient has appt with gastro MD.Question -- ? gallstones in common bile duct ? Wouldn't stones have shown up on original CT scan? If Hep C returns as negative, where to then? My understanding is that you cannot contact Hep C without having contacting Hep B.Any chair-side advice would be welcome. Thanks!! Hep B and Hep C are two different strains, and I don't believe you need to have B before C so to speak.Has the patient been out of the country? There is still Hep D, E and I think there is one other to test, but those are much more rare. My question to you is this - what medications were being taken before the jaundice developed? DOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • October 2, 2007
    • 02:59 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Jaundice occurs when there is 1) too much bilirubin being produced for the liver to remove from the blood. (For example, patients with hemolytic anemia have an abnormally rapid rate of destruction of their red blood cells that releases large amounts of bilirubin into the blood), 2) a defect in the liver that prevents bilirubin from being removed from the blood, converted to bilirubin/glucuronic acid (conjugated) or secreted in bile, or 3) blockage of the bile ducts that decreases the flow of bile and bilirubin from the liver into the intestines. (For example, the bile ducts can be blocked by cancers, gallstones, or inflammation of the bile ducts). The decreased conjugation, secretion, or flow of bile that can result in jaundice is referred to as cholestasis: however, cholestasis does not always result in jaundice. So maybe, you only have an inflammation of the bile ducts which might not show up on a CT. What color is your poop?
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • October 2, 2007
    • 10:19 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Hep B and Hep C are two different strains, and I don't believe you need to have B before C so to speak.Has the patient been out of the country? There is still Hep D, E and I think there is one other to test, but those are much more rare. My question to you is this - what medications were being taken before the jaundice developed? DOM Thanks for your response.Meds taken were birth control (Yaz) and hydroxycut CLA. Both were discontinued during hospital stay.
    4schnookie 3 Replies
    • October 2, 2007
    • 02:57 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Jaundice occurs when there is 1) too much bilirubin being produced for the liver to remove from the blood. (For example, patients with hemolytic anemia have an abnormally rapid rate of destruction of their red blood cells that releases large amounts of bilirubin into the blood), 2) a defect in the liver that prevents bilirubin from being removed from the blood, converted to bilirubin/glucuronic acid (conjugated) or secreted in bile, or 3) blockage of the bile ducts that decreases the flow of bile and bilirubin from the liver into the intestines. (For example, the bile ducts can be blocked by cancers, gallstones, or inflammation of the bile ducts). The decreased conjugation, secretion, or flow of bile that can result in jaundice is referred to as cholestasis: however, cholestasis does not always result in jaundice. So maybe, you only have an inflammation of the bile ducts which might not show up on a CT. What color is your poop? Thanks for your response. Patient's poop is chalk colored.
    4schnookie 3 Replies
    • October 2, 2007
    • 04:56 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Jaundice occurs when there is 1) too much bilirubin being produced for the liver to remove from the blood. (For example, patients with hemolytic anemia have an abnormally rapid rate of destruction of their red blood cells that releases large amounts of bilirubin into the blood), 2) a defect in the liver that prevents bilirubin from being removed from the blood, converted to bilirubin/glucuronic acid (conjugated) or secreted in bile, or 3) blockage of the bile ducts that decreases the flow of bile and bilirubin from the liver into the intestines. (For example, the bile ducts can be blocked by cancers, gallstones, or inflammation of the bile ducts). The decreased conjugation, secretion, or flow of bile that can result in jaundice is referred to as cholestasis: however, cholestasis does not always result in jaundice. So maybe, you only have an inflammation of the bile ducts which might not show up on a CT. What color is your poop? Thanks for your response. Poop is chalk colored
    4schnookie 3 Replies
    • October 2, 2007
    • 04:57 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • 44 yo woman, presented to ER with jaundice, no fever, increased bilirubin. CT scan showed normal stomach organs. Liver normal size. No CBC or chem tests run. Admitted to hosp. After three days in hospital, sent home with no instructions, diet etc. Doc was assuming was Hep A. Hep A, B returned as negative. Now Hep C ordered. While at home, clotting time and bili ordered. Clotting time normal. Bili elevated. Patient starting to lose weight due to nausea and lack of appetite. Jaundice now covers 100% of body. Followup with primary MD resulted in "I don't know what's wrong, I'm stumped." Patient has appt with gastro MD.Question -- ? gallstones in common bile duct ? Wouldn't stones have shown up on original CT scan? If Hep C returns as negative, where to then? My understanding is that you cannot contact Hep C without having contacting Hep B.Any chair-side advice would be welcome. Thanks!!There is a test you can have that specifically looks for Gall Stones. It is called a Hida Scan. You can have it done as an outpatient, it will show how well your gall bladder is functioning. The results come back in a percentage (ie: 23%, or whatever number your results are). Hang in there. The test takes about an hour, It kinda seems like a CT scan, they will inject some medication half way through to see how the gall bladder contracts.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 8, 2010
    • 03:27 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.