Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

pelvic and thigh pain.

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 9 Replies
  • Posted By: abcdefgh
  • February 18, 2009
  • 05:03 PM

Hello All,

I am male 30 and have following symptons for the past couple of months.

First I saw blood in stools.

Then started pelvic pain (some times it is burning sensation).

then went to GI doctor did colonoscopy found hemmerhoids(hope I spelled correclty).

the pelvic still continued.

back pain.

then i started weakness in legs some times pain in thighs.

having skin irritation.

sometimes feel urinating normally, sometimes infrequent and sometimes frequnet. I drong a lot of water. atleast 1.5 litres daily.

With all these symptons dont know what is going on in my body.

I have a doctors appoint scheduled in 3 days.

can someone please tell me what should I be known of with such symptons.

if some one can suggest something about the symptons that will be greatly appreiciated.

Thanks in advance. waiting for any kind of reply

Reply Flag this Discussion

9 Replies:

  • I went to the doctor and he did a digital rectal exam and said my prostrate is enlarged and did a dip stick test with my urine and found blood in it. so asked for a microscopic test of it which came back negative, I mean no blood in it.he prescribed antibiotics for 2 weeks.I am still having mild pelvic pains and occasional leg pain.I never had gross hematuria(visible blood in urine)Can some one please tell me what is going.Thanks.
    abcdefgh 5 Replies
    • February 24, 2009
    • 04:49 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • With back pain, do you mean lower back pain or flank pain? Do you have the pain when you wake up in the morning? Does it get worse if you are up the whole day? Do you have any varicose veins?
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • February 24, 2009
    • 08:18 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • hello Felsen. thanks a lot for a reply. No, its not flank pain. its in the upper spinal cord. The is occasional and I do not have it in the morning. And the pain is mild. And do not have varicose veins. Don’t know what is going on. And I am a bit worried. Please let me know if you have any idea on this. Thanks.
    abcdefgh 5 Replies
    • February 25, 2009
    • 01:17 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • If you have a complete examination and your doctors can’t find any other cause for your symptoms, then here is a suggestion. It might be a vascular problem. There is a vastly underdiagnosed condition called nut-cracker syndrome. It is when the left renal vein is compressed between aorta and the superior mesenteric artery and for each heart beat is “cracked” as a nut in a nut-cracker. With time the vein can react to this compression by producing a sort of scar tissue which leaves even less room for the blood to pass. The symptoms are sometimes left flank pain; sometimes there is blood in the urine, sometimes only little which requires a blood test. Since left genital vein drains in left renal vein, it can also give pelvic symptoms such as pelvic pain, pelvic venous congestion or pelvic varicose veins. Venography (phlebography) is a way to diagnose it (but it requires a radiologist familiar with this condition), ultrasound is less suitable. It is not easy to treat. So far the severe cases have demanded venous surgery, but now the first cases have been treated with stent placement. Sometimes this condition can improve by itself, if collateral veins form around the compression site. At the same time they should rule out May-Thurner syndrome also caller iliac compression syndrome, because it can give buttock and thigh pain. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It does not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain); most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg and/or buttock. (Sometimes the anatomical structures are different and this can happen on the right side). If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. Another typical symptom is ambulating pain, the pain moves around depending on where the pressure is high at the moment. Also, the pain subsides when you lay down. This condition is also vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only certain way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman or man, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. If left untreated, there is a big risk of thrombosis either at the compression site in the left common iliac vein or in the left leg. Could this possibly help? The best of luck! :)
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • February 25, 2009
    • 08:31 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • thanks for your reply.I was a bit concerned about the enlarged prostate which the doctor found when he did the DRE. Did he miss the cancer part of it when he did DRE.are these symptoms point to prostate cancer in advanced stage.Thanks.
    abcdefgh 5 Replies
    • February 26, 2009
    • 06:56 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • The venous conditions which I have mentioned have nothing to do with the prostate. As I see it, these two could be independent of each other. But please try not to worry about the enlarged prostate. It doesn’t mean it’s cancer. Many men have problem with it. Let us know what the doctors say. It’s nice with feedback. Good luck with everything! :)
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • February 26, 2009
    • 11:32 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • thanks Felsen for your replies.I am seeing doctor today and will let you know what he found out.Thanks.
    abcdefgh 5 Replies
    • February 27, 2009
    • 02:26 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • hello Felsen,went to the doctor and he thinks it is prostatis.I am on Cipro now. but no signs of improvement.now occasionally I am having joint pains as well.dont know if I mentioned this before but I feel like I am passing air in my urine.could this anything related to IBD(crohns disease) or any tumour.Doctor asked to PSA test after I finish the Cipro course.dont know what is causing all this.please tell me anything you know about this or anyone else having similar problems.Thanks.
    abcdefgh 5 Replies Flag this Response
  • Abcdefgh,Unfortunately my knowledge about prostatitis is very scarce. Obviously your doctor’s intention is to fight an infection, since he has prescribed Cipro. Infections can sometimes result in joint pain, so called reactive arthritis. There are doctors at this forum and I hope someone else has better knowledge on this subject and can give you more advice. Sorry for not being able to help more. Please, don’t worry. Good luck with everything! :)
    Felsen 510 Replies Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.