Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

pains in my legs and knees

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 6 Replies
  • Posted By: kaimya
  • December 6, 2007
  • 03:33 PM

every couple of months i start to suffer with really bad pains in my legs and knees, ive been to the doctors and even been to see a physio about this but it still comes back and the doctor can only tell me to take paracetamol which dont seem to help. i have been this way since my daughter was born 18 months ago.
i just want to know what the problem is as it sometimes gets to the stage where i cant go nowhere as im in too much pain

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6 Replies:

  • Did you have an epidural with childbirth?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 7, 2007
    • 06:34 AM
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  • no had a spinal as had to have an emergency c section
    kaimya 3 Replies
    • December 7, 2007
    • 10:49 PM
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  • A spinal anesthesia IS an epidural...or did I read you wrong. Look up post-partum epidural after-effects.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • December 8, 2007
    • 11:41 AM
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  • i still shouldnt be going through this pain i get every few months though for the past 18 months plus i had a spinal with my son over 3 years ago and i didnt go through this after i had him
    kaimya 3 Replies
    • December 8, 2007
    • 00:25 PM
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  • You might look into Adhesive Arachnoiditis. A good site is COFWA. Especially read the paper written by Dr Sarah Smith(who has it herself). You need not have all the symptoms but can be diagnosed by the amount you have & an MRI of spine WITH contrast. Sometimes it takes years for symtoms to show up or to get diagnosis. I too have this. COFWA has an excellent support group you can join & I know of several in that group who have gotten AA from an incorrectly placed epidural/spinal anesthesia. There are many causes. Following I will include a paragraph on causes which may apply to you & also symptoms. Good luck & I hope you do not have this. but this may save you years of searching for an answer.1 of many CAUSES: Epidural anesthetics: use in healthy obstetric patients to minimize pain during labor may be unwise if there are suitable non-invasive alternatives; combined spinal/epidural procedures involve placement of the anaesthetic agent directly into the spinal fluid. It is the preservatives which are likely to cause toxic damage to nerve roots, although the anesthetic agents themselves may also directly affect nerves. The practice of regional anesthetic techniques such as epidural anesthetic is a cause for considerable concern if the patient does not or cannot alert the doctor performing the procedure to pain due to inadvertent injection directly into nerve roots. Note also that in procedures of epidural steroid injections, it is common practice to combine this with local anesthetic to confer immediate relief (steroid aiming to provide a more sustained relief over weeks): thus conferring “double jeopardy”.SYPTOMS: Pain Numbness/tingling Sleep disturbance Weakness Muscle cramps/twitches/spasms Stiffness Fatigue Joint pains Balance difficulties Loss of mobility Bladder/bowel/sexual dysfunction Increased sweating Difficulty thinking clearly/Depression Heat intolerance Dry eyes/mouth Weight gain Heartburn/indigestion Difficulty in swallowing Headaches Skin rashes Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) dental problems (tooth decay may be worsened by dry mouth due to loss of the protective power of saliva) abnormalities in the menstrual cycleThe pain tends to be intractable and resistant to treatment, being predominantly neurogenic in origin. This causes persistent burning pain and intermittent stabbing or electric shock type pains. Burning in the feet is common and may be accompanied by a sensation of walking on broken glass.There may also be a component of central pain, which is well known to be difficult to treat. This involves various bizarre sensations, such as pain felt on light touch or a change in temperature (allodynia) or pain felt in a different part of the body to the one being touched. People also experience sensations such as water running down the leg, or insect bites.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 8, 2007
    • 10:07 PM
    • 0
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  • You might look into Adhesive Arachnoiditis. A good site is COFWA. Especially read the paper written by Dr Sarah Smith(who has it herself). You need not have all the symptoms but can be diagnosed by the amount you have & an MRI of spine WITH contrast. Sometimes it takes years for symtoms to show up or to get diagnosis. I too have this. COFWA has an excellent support group you can join & I know of several in that group who have gotten AA from an incorrectly placed epidural/spinal anesthesia. There are many causes. Following I will include a paragraph on causes which may apply to you & also symptoms. Good luck & I hope you do not have this. but this may save you years of searching for an answer. 1 of many CAUSES:Epidural anesthetics: use in healthy obstetric patients to minimize pain during labor may be unwise if there are suitable non-invasive alternatives; combined spinal/epidural procedures involve placement of the anaesthetic agent directly into the spinal fluid. It is the preservatives which are likely to cause toxic damage to nerve roots, although the anesthetic agents themselves may also directly affect nerves. The practice of regional anesthetic techniques such as epidural anesthetic is a cause for considerable concern if the patient does not or cannot alert the doctor performing the procedure to pain due to inadvertent injection directly into nerve roots. Note also that in procedures of epidural steroid injections, it is common practice to combine this with local anesthetic to confer immediate relief (steroid aiming to provide a more sustained relief over weeks): thus conferring “double jeopardy”. SYPTOMS:Pain Numbness/tingling Sleep disturbance Weakness Muscle cramps/twitches/spasms Stiffness Fatigue Joint pains Balance difficulties Loss of mobility Bladder/bowel/sexual dysfunctionIncreased sweating Difficulty thinking clearly/Depression Heat intoleranceDry eyes/mouthWeight gain Heartburn/indigestion Difficulty in swallowing Headaches Skin rashesTinnitus (ringing in the ears)dental problems (tooth decay may be worsened by dry mouth due to loss of the protective power of saliva)abnormalities in the menstrual cycle The pain tends to be intractable and resistant to treatment, being predominantly neurogenic in origin. This causes persistent burning pain and intermittent stabbing or electric shock type pains. Burning in the feet is common and may be accompanied by a sensation of walking on broken glass. There may also be a component of central pain, which is well known to be difficult to treat. This involves various bizarre sensations, such as pain felt on light touch or a change in temperature (allodynia) or pain felt in a different part of the body to the one being touched. People also experience sensations such as water running down the leg, or insect bites. thanks for this information, i will look into it as when i was reading the symptoms i noticed i have a few of them. thanks again
    kaimya 3 Replies
    • December 9, 2007
    • 11:39 PM
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