Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Pain in calf

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 7 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • November 25, 2008
  • 07:24 PM

Last week my calf was swollen, cold and I couldn't walk on it. I went to the doctor and she thought it was a Bakers Cyst. She made me an appointment to see an Orthopedic to have it looked at. The Orthopedic took one look at it and said it looks like you have a blood clot. She immediately sent me to have an Ultra Sound and it came back confirming that I did have a blood clot. My GP started me on Lovenox and Coumadin that day. They did lab work and called me the next day to tell me that everything looked fine and set me up with a Hematologist. I saw the Hematologist today and he told me to get off the Lovenox and Coumadin that it was a Superficial Thrombophelbitis. My question is, how does one doctor go from a Bakers Cyst to DVT and then an other doctor say is Superficial Thrombophelbitis. I'm so confused as to who is right and if I really should be off the meds.:(

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7 Replies:

  • Good question. It's mostly science, but some art. I would stick wioth the hematologist's diagnosis. S/he is an expert in DVT.
    aquila 1263 Replies
    • November 25, 2008
    • 08:49 PM
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  • Baker's cyst is a benign lump usually near your knee. I would assume the first doctor told you the first and most common thing that came to her mind. Blood clot in your leg i beleive has some specific test such as attempting to straighten your leg and i think dorsoflex your foot. If you can't do that = blood clot. and that's probably the thing that the first doctor didn't think about. Keep taking drugs for the blood clot. If it is a baker's cyst that causes some weird effects, then the drugs won't really do much, but if it's a blood clot and you get of the drugs, the clot can break up and move toward your heart and then lungs.The clot is likely if have experienced a long period of not moving around, although some blood disorders can also predispose you to them.
    nckmorris 53 Replies
    • November 25, 2008
    • 10:11 PM
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  • I agree with Nckmorris. Stay on the meds to prevent postthrombotic syndrome.
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • November 26, 2008
    • 09:02 PM
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  • this explains it: http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec03/ch036/ch036c.html
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • November 27, 2008
    • 00:09 AM
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  • Last week my calf was swollen, cold and I couldn't walk on it. I went to the doctor and she thought it was a Bakers Cyst. She made me an appointment to see an Orthopedic to have it looked at. The Orthopedic took one look at it and said it looks like you have a blood clot. She immediately sent me to have an Ultra Sound and it came back confirming that I did have a blood clot. My GP started me on Lovenox and Coumadin that day. They did lab work and called me the next day to tell me that everything looked fine and set me up with a Hematologist. I saw the Hematologist today and he told me to get off the Lovenox and Coumadin that it was a Superficial Thrombophelbitis. My question is, how does one doctor go from a Bakers Cyst to DVT and then an other doctor say is Superficial Thrombophelbitis. I'm so confused as to who is right and if I really should be off the meds.:( ARe you female and do you take birth control pills?DOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • November 27, 2008
    • 04:41 AM
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  • Teoretically the Echography should give the right diagnosis .A Phlebography would bring some more light
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 28, 2008
    • 06:41 PM
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  • ARe you female and do you take birth control pills?DOM I am a Female and was on birth control pills. Since the blood clot was found, I've been off.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 1, 2008
    • 07:39 PM
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