Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

My 20 Yr Old Daughter Keeps Fainting...now Shes On Prozac?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 18 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • March 9, 2007
  • 11:40 PM

Would welcome any feedback. Our 20 year old daughter is a working college student whose life is slowly falling apart. In Oct '06 she fainted at work for the first time. She was taken to emergency via ambulance. After many tests she was discharged and told she had "syncope" which is a fancy word for fainting. Her Dr placed her on Prozac as she stated she was starting to have a lot of anxiety. Over these past months, she has been to the emergency 8 different times where she has passed/fainted both at school and at work. She did have one episode at home and we called the paramedics. In addition to 8 different emergency trips she was placed in the hospital for overnight observation. She has had a battery of tests which include XRay of Neck, Cat Scan, CT, Blood-Screen, Drugs, Pregnancy, Tilt-Table, EKG, 24Hr Heart Monitor all which have produced a negative result. While in the hospital she had the Tilt-Table test which produced a positive result. All these Dr's have concluded a diagnosis of "phycogenic syncope". We haven't really gotten a straight answer what that means except to say they can't find anything medically wrong with her and yet she continues to have episodes. Now she is growing worse with anxiety, confusion, mood swings. I think she has no business being on an SSRI and maybe that is causing these additional symptoms. Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

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18 Replies:

  • Hi,The first thing that came to mind when I read your post was orthostatic hypotention (your blood pressure falls when you stand). But there are SO many possibilities. The regular site here at Wrong Diagnosis has a tremendous amount of information about syncope. Here is a good page to start with:http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/s/syncope/causes.htmProzac is known to be helpful for some young people experiencing syncope, so the prescription is normal. But that doesn't mean it is right for her. On the other hand, stopping the med abruptly, or without a doctor following her for that, could be dangerous. What if it turns out that the Prozac was helping her, and she got even worse off of it? Or if she has a withdrawal problem?Is it possible the Prozac is making this worse? Definitely. Prozac is known to cause odd kinds of anxiety in adolescents, and a 20yo may still be an adolescent. If her syncope is made worse by anxiety, and the Prozac is making that worse, then yes, that could be it.But, like I said before, DO NOT go off Prozac (or any other psycho-active medicine) without back up of a doctor. It is really dangerous. On the other hand, it would be perfectly reasonable to talk with her doctor, and ask if they think your daughter could do a trial withdrawal of the Prozac. Explain that you are concerned that it is making it worse. So, read the article at the link above, and dig around the syncope area of this website. I think you'll get a lot of good information there. Probably too much! Then come back here with more questions.It must be incredibly nerve wracking to see your daughter going through this. But she is lucky to have you working on this. I can't tell you how many young people post on this board, and don't seem to have the back up of their parents.Best,Shula
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • With the tilt table being +, I would suggest a test you can do at home that can indicate if it may be mostly the adrenal glands. Have her lie down in a quiet place for about 10 minutes. After the 10 minutes, while still lying down, take her blood pressure. Then have her stand quickly (with the BP cuff still on her arm but not inflated).As soon as she quickly stands, reinflate the cuff and and take the BP again. There should be an increase. If there is any kind of decrease, it indicates adrenal gland stress. The bigger the drop, the worse the stress.This is often common in people today, as they are often on the run, stressed both physically and emotionally. Please try it a few times and if there is a drop post here and I will give some suggestions on how to deal effectively with it. I have seen this problem often in patients.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Please do not listen to anything Shula or Acuann tell you. My sister just passed away because Shula and Acuann told her that her doctor was wrong and she did not have a serious condition. Acuann even told her to get acupuncture to get healed. These people are going to be investigated for practicing medicine without a license. Shula and Acuann are specifically wanted in connection with my sisters homocide. Thats right homocide. If she would have listened to her doctor instead of these internet quacks she would still be here today. Rest assured I will do everything in my power to put these two behind bars and shut this website down for good.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Post above = TROLL.To be more specific, an internet troll to bash alternative health advice.IMO some of these trolls are probably being paid to do this.Over 800,000 deaths per year from current regular health care (search www.mercola.com for the article) yet TROLLS scream and try to frighten the public about the "dangers" of alternative care.Why is there so little concern and ACTION being taken to clean up the traditional medicne mess first ?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have the same problem.Im a 28yr old male.Ive seen two doctors that referd me to a Psch.She put me on Effexor which didnt do anything but keep me up at night,after that trazadone. I took both for about 7 months.About 3 months ago I fainted again.Since then Ive had diarria for 2 months they couldnt figer it out. Stoped the medications cold turkey and the diarria stopped.Now Im still fainting.Right before I wrote this,I went into a cold sweat and felt really dizzy checked my blood pressure 4 times in 5 min.Went from 133/81 in the morning to 103/63 while i went through my dizziness101/61 all the way to95/52 it lasted for about 10 min.that was 40 min ago right now its 131/82.I think im doing it to my self now.I really hope your daughter gets better.It really sucks I know its ruining and running my life Good Luck, If anybodys got advice for me please help?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 28, 2007
    • 07:26 AM
    • 0
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  • Your regular blood pressure is too high, and those falling numbers, and then coming back up is all strange.Forget the psychologists. Talk to a cardiologist who specializes in blood pressure problems. It sounds like whatever regulates your blood pressure is way out of whack.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 29, 2007
    • 00:49 AM
    • 0
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  • MY DAUGHTER IS 16 SHE HAS BEEN GETTING DIZZY AND FAINTING SPELLS FOR SEVERAL YEARS. FIRST THE DOCS SAID HORMONES, THEN IT WAS JUST NORMAL. IT CANT BE NORMAL SHE HAS BEEN TOLD THAT IT IS SYNCOPE. TONIGHT WE ENDED UP IN THE E.R. SHE PASSED OUT TODAY BUT THIS TIME WITH NO WARNING AND UPON WAKING HER FINGERS AND TOWNS WHERE CONTORTING. MORE LIKE A SEIZURE. THEY DID A EKG FOUND NOTHING SAID THE FINGER AND TOE THING IS CALLED CARPEL PEDAL SPASM, WHICH HAPPENS WHEN YOU HYPERVENTILATE FOR A LONG PERIOD OF TIME. SHE DOES NOT HYPERVENTILATE SHE PASSES OUT.CAN ANYONE HELP WE ARE TIRED OF BEING TOLD NOTHING IS WRONG!!!!!Would welcome any feedback. Our 20 year old daughter is a working college student whose life is slowly falling apart. In Oct '06 she fainted at work for the first time. She was taken to emergency via ambulance. After many tests she was discharged and told she had "syncope" which is a fancy word for fainting. Her Dr placed her on Prozac as she stated she was starting to have a lot of anxiety. Over these past months, she has been to the emergency 8 different times where she has passed/fainted both at school and at work. She did have one episode at home and we called the paramedics. In addition to 8 different emergency trips she was placed in the hospital for overnight observation. She has had a battery of tests which include XRay of Neck, Cat Scan, CT, Blood-Screen, Drugs, Pregnancy, Tilt-Table, EKG, 24Hr Heart Monitor all which have produced a negative result. While in the hospital she had the Tilt-Table test which produced a positive result. All these Dr's have concluded a diagnosis of "phycogenic syncope". We haven't really gotten a straight answer what that means except to say they can't find anything medically wrong with her and yet she continues to have episodes. Now she is growing worse with anxiety, confusion, mood swings. I think she has no business being on an SSRI and maybe that is causing these additional symptoms. Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 8, 2007
    • 03:33 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I advise getting MRI of brain and neck and go to a neurologist. Let the neurologist lead you to your next doctor if they can't find anything..Good Luck!Bobbi
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 9, 2007
    • 03:52 AM
    • 0
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  • If all the medical tests come back normal, i suggest seeking care of an experienced chiropractor. I was having the same problem a year ago, and I ended up having subluxations around where the nerves of the heart are controlled. after a series of treatments, i started feeling better. hope this helps...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 9, 2007
    • 09:53 PM
    • 0
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  • When she faints- is she aware of what's going on but unable to move or speak? Does she faint especially in response to strong emotions (anger, laughter, fear...) this is just one consideration but "cataplexy" is a type of falling down often confused with fainting. If she is also very sleepy at unusual times and has the above symptoms, consider a sleep doctor/neurologist. Cataplexy is no fun to have but is easily treated."Psychogenic syncope" means they think she faints on purpose. If this doesn't sound right to you, don't listen to it, and make sure she gets a complete medical evaluation by someone who is not biased by this term on her chart (once they see "psychogenic," it's tough for them to consider other diagnoses.)IF it is possible that she is under so much stress that she wants/needs the attention that the fainting brings her, please do consider that it could be "psychogenic" which is a real cry for help. One clue to psychogenic syncope might be that she never hurts herself when she falls (never hits her head, for example).
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 12, 2007
    • 04:26 AM
    • 0
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  • "Psychogenic syncope" means they think she faints on purpose. If this doesn't sound right to you, don't listen to it, and make sure she gets a complete medical evaluation by someone who is not biased by this term on her chart (once they see "psychogenic," it's tough for them to consider other diagnoses.)Actually. though Psychogenic syncope is a psychological rather than physiological disorder it does not mean that they believe she is doing this on purpose, or is even aware that she is doing it. Psychogenic syncope is a somatoform disorder, meaning that her body is dealing with a psychological distress with physical symptoms that have no real physiological explanation. my best friend suffers from vasovagal syncope that prevents her at 21 from living on her own, working, driving or having any sort of life. we've been down the pacemaker road, to no effect, and are now working with neurologists, cariologists, internists and a host of alternative medicines including acupucture to no avail. I really hope that in your daughter's case they are able to find a combination of medications or treatments that will allow her to continue her normal life. If you haven't tried it i would suggest having her speak with a psychologist or counselor, stress can do terrible things to ones body especially as a working collge student... and it can't hurt.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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  • Would welcome any feedback. Our 20 year old daughter is a working college student whose life is slowly falling apart. In Oct '06 she fainted at work for the first time. She was taken to emergency via ambulance. After many tests she was discharged and told she had "syncope" which is a fancy word for fainting. Her Dr placed her on Prozac as she stated she was starting to have a lot of anxiety. Over these past months, she has been to the emergency 8 different times where she has passed/fainted both at school and at work. She did have one episode at home and we called the paramedics. In addition to 8 different emergency trips she was placed in the hospital for overnight observation. She has had a battery of tests which include XRay of Neck, Cat Scan, CT, Blood-Screen, Drugs, Pregnancy, Tilt-Table, EKG, 24Hr Heart Monitor all which have produced a negative result. While in the hospital she had the Tilt-Table test which produced a positive result. All these Dr's have concluded a diagnosis of "phycogenic syncope". We haven't really gotten a straight answer what that means except to say they can't find anything medically wrong with her and yet she continues to have episodes. Now she is growing worse with anxiety, confusion, mood swings. I think she has no business being on an SSRI and maybe that is causing these additional symptoms. Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?Have they looked into Stokes Adams Attacks?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • sorry to hear about your daughter Seeing the tilt table test was positive.. i'd think she has Neurally Mediated Syncope / orthostatic intolerance.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
  • Yes! It does sound familiar. I'm so glad I can try to help you! I'm a 21 year old female and I used to faint all the time when I was in high school. My heart would actually stop beating for about 10 seconds because my brain and heart were not able to connect with eachother control my fast heart rate. The fainting was usually caused by anxiety, but I know that there are various causes. I also had a positive tilt table test and I was diagnosed with neurocardiogenic syncope. My cardiologist put me on beta blockers and Toprol. The cardiologist who diagnosed me, told me that symptoms usually go away on their own. Thankfully this was true for me. I would highly recommend that your daughter see a cardiologist for this. Definitely check into the neurocardiogenic syncope. I hope I was able to help.
    meggiemeg86 8 Replies Flag this Response
  • http://www.healthscout.com/ency/68/754/main.htmlMy 15 year old daughter has had the same symptoms. It has been frustrating. I fully understand what you are going through. I just found the info above regarding the vagus nerve and wanted to share it.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 8, 2009
    • 05:21 PM
    • 0
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  • Similar condition is with my 21 years daughter. Every 15 to 20 days she faints and remain unconcious for a period of 1 to 2 hours. Can any body suggest any treatment. Thanks.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • if you have ever seen someone faint, or have fainted yourself... like me. then you would definitely be able to tell if someone is faking it. like the post above me said they wouldn't hurt themselves.mostly when people faint they'll be able to tell it's going to happen. it's not like BAM everything goes black and you fall to the floor (thought it may seem like that to others around them).when i fainted i notice that the first thing to happen is i loose my hearing. i'll hear this horrible ringing in my ears. then i'll start to loose my vision (this is when i also get really dizzy) if you're watching someone at this point, they will obviously have balance issues and should be trying to hold onto something... i know i was trying to hold myself by grabbing onto my car. it's usually not long after this that they will drop to the ground. it would be a real fall. it would make a loud sound. their body should be completely limp. their tongue might even be hanging out.anyway, how i made it to this site. i don't know if anyone has advice for me.i'm worried about my boyfriend. he has told me that whenever he comes to attention or stands at parade rest in a formation that he begins to feel dizzy, gets tunnel vision and almost passes out. it must be something pyschologically induced if it only happens during those activites. he's been in the marines for 5 years and this only started happening about a year ago. it is some sort of an anxiety disorder you think?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I agree with the above poster. Many can tell when they are about to faint, I guess it would depend on what the issue is, how much warning one may get. In my case.. i have Postural orthostatic Tachycardia syndrome (POTS..a common cause of fainting if you find heat makes it worst).. which can cause me to pass out (for up to 5 mins according to a friend, ive been out completely)... I do 95% of the time have warning that Im getting bad enough to faint due to the dizziness and lightheadedness which kicks in first. (at which point I'll usually sit straight back down again or go to grap something by reaching out an arm to try to steady myself..sometimes landing in a heap on the floor at that point). I get unsteady on my feet before I faint. As I fainted and banged my head on the corner of the kitchen counter/cupboard when young (that time as I'd never fainted before, I had no idea I was going to faint).. im very careful to try to not get myself into a position in which if i pass out, Im going to go banging my head on an object again. I really have a fear when dizzy or about to faint of banging my head due to my past experience of it. (That is the ONLY time Ive ever hurt myself during a faint).............. To the above poster about "he has told me that whenever he comes to attention or stands at parade rest in a formation that he begins to feel dizzy, gets tunnel vision and almost passes out." No your boyfriend isnt faking it.. fainting can happen due to parades due to the standing. In some people just standing about causes their blood pressure to drop suddenly and then an actual faint is possible. Your boyfriend is at risk of going further than just dizziness but of actual fainting. Fainting isnt uncommon in such a situation. Low Blood pressure or conditions such as POTS can have fainting when just standing. He should be checked for both.. its probably low blood pressure.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
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