Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Multiple symptoms started at same time- ready to give up! HELP PLEASE!

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 26 Replies
  • Posted By: takidd4597
  • January 26, 2009
  • 10:58 AM

About a year and a half ago my blood pressure went very low and my doctor took me off my blood pressure medication. It stayed perfect for a little over 6-months. Then 6-months ago my blood pressure was 210/136 so he put me back on my medication but it did not work so he increased it and also added one to it. I also informed him that the tremmor I had in my hands had become worse, I began having severe fatigue, muscle pain(stabbing)(come and goes different muscles each time),can't sleep but when I do I can sleep 24/7 and not want to wake up, never feel refreshed, forget things, lack of concentration and just don't feel good.
He ran blood work and thyroid and also pituitary and did an MRI of pituitary and it came back fine. The only thing that has come back abnormal is my testosterone! It is 137 and should be between 400-1200 per the lab scale. This is the only thing he has come up with in 6-months time and is going to give me a testosterone cream.(which the insurance company is fighting).

Can this cause all my symptoms and make me feel this way? What could this be?

I am not trying to seem like a baby but my wife is getting frustrated with me and also I am tired of feeling this way! I am at a loss and am ready to give up!

Any help appreciated! Thanks in advance!

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26 Replies:

  • What meds are you on?
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • January 26, 2009
    • 01:26 PM
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  • And how old are you?
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • January 26, 2009
    • 01:28 PM
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  • I am a 39yo white male. I also have a essential tremmor that i have has for many years(primidone for it) Before it started I was on: lotensin hct 5/6.25 (for almost 2 years)81mg asprin primidone 50mg and nothing else then due to running too low I was taken off lotensin and stayed normal to low for over 6 months. After all symptoms began and I went to the doctor I was placed on: I also forgot to mention in the first post that when all this began I also began having erectile dysfunction. My essential tremmor has become worse and the medication is not helping anymore. lotensin hct 5/6.25it did not help bring pressure down at all. Then increased to below: lotensin hct 10/12.5vytorin 10/40cardizem cd 120mgprimidone 50mgambien 10mgasprin 81mg The only other thing that has shown up in my tests is an occurence of epstein barr but he said it was nothing.
    takidd4597 2 Replies
    • January 26, 2009
    • 11:30 PM
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  • YOU might be having drug interactions.For example,you can get muscle pain or weakness while taking Cardizem and simvistatin(one of the drugs in Vytorin).You need to have a CPK test done to check on your muscles.You can also get a myopathy from the Vytorin itself,so,again you need a CPK.The Ambien and Cardizem can cause confusion,daytime drowsiness and dizziness.I hope this helps you.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 00:25 AM
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  • i hope you find out whats wrong with you, blue dancer...(as long as you hope i find out what's wrong with me:o)
    mr. moore 30 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 00:36 AM
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  • It's also important to realize that hypertension can result in cases where low testosterone levels are observed. Erectile dysfunction can most certainly take place in the presence of sub-optimal testosterone levels as well. Stess has been shown to suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in some persons and subsequently decrease testosterone levels. Correcting the low testosterone may prove to demonstrate commensurate relief of a number of your symptomatic complaints. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 01:10 AM
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  • To blaze, You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about and I find it absolutely disgusting that you and others on this site continuously and persistently try and prey upon people seeking answers to medical questions by loading the threads with this type of spam that is designed to try and coax them to certian websites which encourage membership and more importantly, money donations. You, as well as the others I speak of, are not licensed medical doctors, nor do you have clinical training or experience and you in particular suffer from a significant psychiatric disorder. While I'm certain that most people can quickly see through your schemes to promote your ulterior motives, it should be stated clearly here that postings such as yours are deceptive in their entirely and seek to direct people desperate for help to other websites where they might be more prone to give money. You should be ashamed. J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 01:25 AM
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  • Dr. Cottle, Could this in your opinion be cronic fatigue syndrome and are there any tests that can determine it? The fatigue is severe as is the muscle pains and joint pain. I can go in to bed at 8pm and toss and turn until 6am and then fall asleep and sleep all day and never feel refreshed. I get the memory loss. I can't seem to function to be able to hold a job. I can't do many of the things required with the fatigue and muscle pains aand shaking of my hands. Prior to becomming ill I was a truck driver and am also affraid I will not be able to pass my DOT physical if I should even be driving a big truck at all. Any input appreciated! Also could any of this be cardiovascular related or kidney? WOuld you recommend changing doctors or do you think he is on the correct path regarding the testosterone only being the cause of all problems?
    takidd4597 2 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:03 AM
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  • , I began having severe fatigue, muscle pain(stabbing)(come and goes different muscles each time),can't sleep but when I do I can sleep 24/7 and not want to wake up, never feel refreshed, forget things, lack of concentration and just don't feel good. If it turns out that no other suggestions pan out, and your doctors are at a loss.. then consider chronic fatigue syndrome. The symptoms above are very common and main symptoms of CFS esp if you are worst after exertion. (i know a couple of guys with it, that also do have low testosterone too but i dont know if that is actually can be a symptom to it too, or maybe in thier cases may just be a coincidence??).
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:06 AM
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  • :) @ takidd.. we must of been writing our posts at the same time. Thou im sure DrCottle is a good doctor, i want to say that many doctors know very little about CFS and are not at all up to date with the latest research on this illness so sometimes one can get wrong answers. (im not implying that DrCottle would give you a wrong answer about it...as i dont know what kind of answer he would give). If you have questions on CFS it is often best to see a doctor who has CFS patients eg has experience wth it and is up to date with this illness. I myself have CFS (unfortunately 12 yrs) and dont mind answering quewstions on it. (i have a high involvement in many CFS support groups etc.. and keep up to date with all the recent studies due to my interest in it). I can go in to bed at 8pm and toss and turn until 6am and then fall asleep That issue can be an issue with having a reversed sleep cycle.. which is a common issue in CFS. For this symptom, those with CFS often take melatonin. I can't seem to function to be able to hold a job. That's very common in CFS as CFS affects so greatly. With the hand shaking getting worst.. in CFS often those body parts we use the most will give us to most issues. Im a lot better than i was, but I've been throu periods in which I couldnt even write and would also drop things.. due to hand shakiness. (but then if you've had the hand shaky issue all your life.. that could be unrelated. http://wwcoco.com/cfids/bernesx.html i also suggest for you to look up the canadian CFS/ME diagnostic defination. http://forum.notcrazy.net/ if you scroll down to the General ME/CFS chat link. You could post there to a regular there called Ash and ask him if the testosterone issue is related to CFS or a separate issue. Ash also has these issues going you have so probably would know if it's related. Ash from what I remember, has found the testosterone replacement helpful thou if you do have CFS it's not going to fix you.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:26 AM
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  • Could this in your opinion be cronic fatigue syndrome and are there any tests that can determine it? At the moment no there isnt any specific tests for it as such as it's currently a matter of elimination of other illnesses and then if you meet the criteria for it. What is even more confusing as due to them still learning about this illness, they keep on changing the diagnostic criteria. Also currently different countries have different diagnostic criteria, some countries are viewed thou worldwide in CFS circles and by CFS experts as having better CFS diagnostic criteria than others. (CFS experts worldwide dont like Americas CFS diagnostic guidelines as it's possible for by using them, ones with only depression can be falsely diagnosed with CFS.. same goes with the English diagnostic stuff.. currently in England things are being taken to the high court! The CFS/ME associations over there are discusted with what is going on and have a good case it looks like they will win to change things some). There are thou scientific tests which can be done which can help point to the fact, help confirm, that someone may have CFS/ME .. the findings of them, thou abnormalities are "unspecific" abnormalities. Meaning that the abnormalities are often found in other illnesses as well............ Actually in truth there is a CFS/ME test which can diagnose us, this blood test also tells us which subgroup of it when are in. They hope to have it publically available within the next year. (so at this point we need to wait and see). There are also two other groups of ones doing studies.. who it looks very hopeful they will develolp a test based on recent findings (on different findings to the other group and to each other). So Im assuming at this point that there will be a test for this within the next two years........... Some of the latest research of CFS is backing up the theory that it's a mitochondrial dysfunction (hence we have something wrong with the power centres of our cells and with energy production). (i'll post that in next post for anyone interested)
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:45 AM
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  • some ground breaking CFS research "Int J Clin Exp Med (2009) 2, 1-16www.ijcem.com/IJCEM812001Original ArticleChronic fatigue syndrome and mitochondrial dysfunctionSarah Myhill1, Norman E. Booth2, John McLaren-Howard31Sarah Myhill Limited, Llangunllo, Knighton, Powys, Wales LD7 1SL, UK; 2Department of Physics and Mansfield College, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH, UK; 3Acumen, PO Box 129, Tiverton, Devon EX16 0AJ, UKReceived December 2, 2008; accepted January 12, 2009; available online January 15, 2009Abstract: This study aims to improve the health of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) by interventions based on the biochemistry of the illness, specifically the function of mitochondria in producing ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy currency for all body functions, and recycling ADP (adenosine diphosphate) to replenish the ATP supply as needed. Patients attending a private medical practice specializing in CFS were diagnosed using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. In consultation with each patient, an integer on the Bell Ability Scale was assigned, and a blood sample was taken for the “ATP profile” test, designed for CFS and other fatigue conditions. Each test produced 5 numerical factors which describe the availability of ATP in neutrophils, the fraction complexed with magnesium, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation, and the transfer efficiencies of ADP into the mitochondria and ATP into the cytosol where the energy is used. With the consent of each of 71 patients and 53 normal, healthy controls the 5 factors have been collated and compared with the Bell Ability Scale. The individual numerical factors show that patients have different combinations of biochemical lesions. When the factors are combined, a remarkable correlation is observed between the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and the severity of illness (P ...................... (If one gets hold of the full study to read, it's fascinating the differences between us and the control group)
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:47 AM
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  • TO BLAZE: Taken directly from the face page of Lymenet LymeNet Fundraiser 2008The non-profit Lyme Disease Network, operates entirely on individual donations and is responsible for the LymeNet series of services available on the Internet since 1994. It's absolutely necessary that we support LymeNet to continue educating the public about the prevention and treatment of Lyme and other tick borne diseases. LEGAL NOTICE: INFORMATION FILED WITH THE ATTORNEY GENERAL CONCERNING THIS CHARITABLE SOLICITATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY BY CALLING 973-504-6215. REGISTRATION WITH THE ATTORNEY GENERAL DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT. N.J.S.A. 45:17A-38 That's just one example of the websites constantly posted by you and by all means feel free to contact the moderator to report me at your convenience. As a licensed physician, I have every right to speak my opinions here about constant efforts by you and others to divert people to non-medical sites for the purposes of soliciting participation or donations by preying upon their need for medical information. J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:01 PM
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  • To TAKIDD4597 My suggestion to you is to have the low testosterone treated and determine your status at that point. Realize that low testosterone can be responsible for fatigue, lethargy, muscle weakness and a host of other symptoms. Incidentally, I am fully aware of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome but do not subscribe to it as a disease, regardless of the literature being drummed about it. Symptoms of CFS are identical to those of clinical depression, the actual underlying cause of the symptoms in my professional opinion. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:07 PM
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  • Blaze:I agree totally with Dr.Cottle.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • January 27, 2009
    • 05:55 PM
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  • so im just wondering did blue dancer find out whats wrong?
    mr. moore 30 Replies
    • January 28, 2009
    • 04:22 AM
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  • Dear Dr Cottle, Just out of curiosity, why would you think that depression is the underlying cause of CFS? I am not a doctor myself but almost two years ago I was diagnosed with Post Viral Fatigue, which lasted for quite a while. During that time I had the opportunity to become familiar with the Greek medical establishment (I'm writing from Greece) and after a point started realizing that most of the doctors here seem to have very conflicting perceptions on the issue, which can be really damaging to a patient. CFS was discussed in my case, and so was depression. From a point of view of a person who is perfectly happy with her life and still felt debilitating fatigue for months, I don't agree. I might be wrong, but I have a gut feeling, so to speak, that there's more than it meets the eye here. I have studied about CFS a lot ( my GP says jokingly that I know more than any doctor in the city I live) and what made impression on me is that a. CFS patients do not suffer from a bleak perspective on life before the onset of the illness, something consistent with depression, they rather develop depression as the result of their condition and b. probably the most conflicting thing is that depression improves with mild exercise, while when you suffer from CFS or PVF, after exercise, or even a 10 minute walk, you feel as if you were hit by a truck and need 2 days of sleep to recover. That's just my opinion, thank you for reading.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 28, 2009
    • 11:34 AM
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  • Okay, several comments require clarification here: I did not state that depression was the underlying cause of CFS, but rather that CFS and clinical depression are one in the same. Post-viral Syndrome is not the same as what is generally defined as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I would therefore not characterize the symptomatology described by you as necessarily falling under the heading of clinical depression. But I would also not classify it as CFS either. You are comparing apples and oranges in this instance. There is no clincial evidence to support that mild exercise causes universal improvement in clinical depression. Clinical depression that reaches levels to produce somatoform features would not generally improve with mild exercise alone. Again, I do not subscribe to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome as a disease and where evidence of clinical depression is recorded, together with a constellation of somatoform features, it is clinical depression that underlies the disorder and not CFS in my professional experience. Treating the clinical depression has also produced corresponding improvement in the somatoform features as well. What is not being discussed here is the rather hidden agenda to produce an alternate stream for reimbursement for clinical depression that in its present classification, offers capitated provisions by the healthcare insurance industry. The calculated efforts to define a physical ailment or syndrome that can offer extended reimbursement benefits is all too welcome among certain healthcare providers and patients alike. Being "familiar" with the medical establishment and practicing within it for more than 40 years as a physician can produce strikingly opposing views in certain cases. I trust that you're as pleased with yours as I am with my own. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • January 28, 2009
    • 03:47 PM
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  • Have you been checked for hypoglycemia. You have many of the symptoms. Also hypertension is connected to it since people with hypoglycemia tend to lose magnesium in the urine. Low magnesium can lead to hypertension as well as depression.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 28, 2009
    • 07:03 PM
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  • Dr.Cottle, Please don't forget about my wife and her bilaterally symmetrical wrist pain.Do I need to refresh your memory about her?I agree with you.I never diagnosed anyone with chronic fatigue syndrome.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • January 30, 2009
    • 09:50 PM
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