Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Mr

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 5 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • October 10, 2007
  • 08:58 PM

My daughter has pains in the legs - actually it feels more like in the bones of her leg and feels ´deep´ inside. It sometimes throbs and the location of most intesity can seems to move from place to place.
The pain can go on for hours and then eventually fades away. It can return at odd times and is quite erratic as to when it comes and goes. It does not seem to be something she eatsor drinks, or the weather or.... we are at a loss as to why this occurs. She can be having a period, before, in-between etc. We cannot determine any pattern. She gets them when she excercises (she is a teenager) and also when she does not.
She is very pain tolerant and if she starts to cry then we know it is severe,
Also, sometime she can get it in her legs and then later (together) in her arm/s or back.
We have no explanation and does drive us crazy.
A point to note is that when I (her father) was young I had exactly the same thing and we never found out what caused this.
This is NOT so-called ´growing pains´
Any ideas? Anyone?

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5 Replies:

  • Legg-Calve-Perthes-Disease or a Osteomyelitis (bone infection)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 11, 2007
    • 02:09 AM
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  • Childhood arthritis or lyme disease. Take her to a specialist.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • October 11, 2007
    • 05:33 AM
    • 0
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  • IntroductionTeens who wake up in the middle of the night with leg pain or uncontrollable movement may suffer from restless leg syndrome. The condition is hard to diagnose because it may be overlooked as the cause of the night time waking until it becomes severe. Step OneTake your son or daughter to a doctor when presenting symptoms. A family doctor may suggest going to a sleep clinic or pediatric neurologist. 2Step TwoPromote drinking 8 to 10 glasses of water a day or other fluids to hydrate his body. Limit the amount of caffeine your child drinks during the day. 3Step ThreeMassage your teenager's legs daily. The doctor may ask them to see a physical therapist. Leg exercises may also be assigned. Be sure your teen follows through with the exercise. 4Step FourEstablish a normal bedtime routine. Keep daytime naps to a minimum so your teen is tired enough to sleep the 9 to 10 hours he needs each night. 5Step FiveSuggest a warm bath before bed to help soothe tired muscles. Stretching legs in the morning may help relieve symptoms. Tips & WarningsA teenager that's tired during the day could be suffering from restless leg syndrome at night. Ask your teen what feeling he has in his legs when he awakes in the middle of the night. If he describes a burning, itching, tingling or pain he may have restless leg syndrome. Find out if your teen feels urges to move his legs during the day. Restless leg syndrome can affect teens during the daytime as well. Don't allow your teen to drink caffeine 2 hours or less before bedtime. Don't let your teen eat a big meal right before bedtime. Make sure your teen doesn't do any strenuous exercising right before bed
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • October 11, 2007
    • 09:37 AM
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  • Osgood-Schlatter tibial disease
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • October 11, 2007
    • 09:38 AM
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  • Thanks for the info.My response is as follows:Due to a lack in providing info I need to be more clear.Not Lymes Desease as we are from South africa and living in the UK. My daughter had is in South Africa as well as here. Lymes disease is USA locality - refer to US CDC notation.Osgood-Schlatter tibial disease:The symptoms as per documentation for girls usually ends at 12 years old - she is 16. Not to say this is not the case but unlikely. I would not say overly athletic.rad-skw, re RLSMy duaghter drikes at minimum 2Litres of water daily (she is fanatical about this).Will try the massage routine daily for a while - the problems is that this will be present for a few days and go away for a week and come back. It is erratic in that sense.My daughter does not nap and sleeps every night very well (unless pain is intense) and is quite regular for a teen. She is a talker I would say and does sleepwalk although this has become more rare.Warm/hot baths do not help at all. The pain feels like it is in the bones NOT the muscles.I do not believe that it is the muscles (well it does not seems to be the muscles) and I am sure I understand what she is experiencing as I had the same thing as a kid/teen with the same symptoms. We never found the answer ... but that was many years ago.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 11, 2007
    • 09:21 PM
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