Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Losing teeth!

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: JS311263
  • August 11, 2010
  • 11:02 AM

I brush twice a day,use mouthwash,have regular appointments at my dentist etc.I had one filling in the whole of my first 45 years on the planet but in the last two years I have lost teeth,had abcesses and now have loose teeth.My dentist insists it is not ginivitis.I am wondering if my blood pressure medication which I started taking aged 43 could be contributing to my oral problems? I take LISINOPRIL and SIMVASTATINS daily? Any suggestions gratefully received.:confused:

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  • I brush twice a day,use mouthwash,have regular appointments at my dentist etc.I had one filling in the whole of my first 45 years on the planet but in the last two years I have lost teeth,had abcesses and now have loose teeth.My dentist insists it is not ginivitis.I am wondering if my blood pressure medication which I started taking aged 43 could be contributing to my oral problems? I take LISINOPRIL and SIMVASTATINS daily? Any suggestions gratefully received.:confused:Hi I have watched my mother struggle with this even after meticulous care and good hygeine with many dental appointments and great care to teeth,,,,she is on Wytensin and because it causes dehydration which helps with her blood pressure, it has caused her to not secrete much saliva...yes I would have to say that it is your blood pressure medication and I would look at alternatives but one must weigh the two,,,,stroke or less teeth.....We have recently come to the conclusion that her blood pressure medication has caused this...good luck to you
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 12, 2010
    • 10:04 AM
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  • Drugs can affect gumsDrugs can cause gum problems such as inflammation, bleeding or ulceration. Diseased gums can lead to other dental problems including tooth loss. Drugs linked to an increased risk of gum problems include: AntihistaminesAntihypertensivesChemotherapy drugsCocaine, when rubbed over the gumsCrack cocaine, when smokedImmunosuppressive drugsOral contraceptives.http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Teeth_and_drug_useor Maybe a vitamin deficiency of some kind Low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, depression, dental caries, osteoporosis, and periodontal disease, Get your vitamin D levels checked.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • August 12, 2010
    • 10:19 AM
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  • The tooth that has grown down into the gap is now threatened by gum disease because of its awkward position. The space vacated by the former tooth creates a trap for food and bacteria that can be very difficult to clean. Periodontal disease may spread to the rest of the body, doubling your risk for heart disease and increasing the risks for a multitude of other ailments. Remember, this is the result of one missing tooth. Imagine what several missing teeth can do.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 12, 2010
    • 11:18 AM
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