Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Leg Pain and Foot swelling

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 11 Replies
  • Posted By: STL_RunAround
  • August 11, 2008
  • 09:46 PM

Hello All, forgive me if I ramble...

I am 27 y/o male. 6'0" 210lbs

I have been having a continual problem with pain/discomfort in my left leg and occasional swelling of my left foot. The sensation in the leg is mild pain and a general discomfort/annoying feeling. These problems have progressed over the last 6 months, and my left foot seems to swell more often. The swelling has gotten worse in the last month, which has caused me to become more concerned.

I went to a local vascular specialist who ordered an arterial dopler (negative) and said that it looks like lymphadema and that its untreatable outside of compression stockings.

I was told by an acquaintance that it could be a rare syndrome known as May-Thurners and could be diagnosed with a venogram. So I went and saw a second vascular surgeon who ordered an abdominal ultrasound (negative) and told me that he didn't see enough evidence to warrant a venogram and to come see him if the swelling gets worse.

I guess my quesion is has anyone had similar symptoms, and if it is lymphodema what kind of doctor should i go see in order to figure out where it came from or what caused it? I kind of feel like im being ignored and possibly not looking in the right direction. Any thoughts or advice is welcomed. Thanks!

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11 Replies:

  • Are you currently taking any medications?DOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • August 12, 2008
    • 00:42 AM
    • 0
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  • (having problems logging in)No, no medications. Last year I had a bronchial infection that kept coming back and I switched back and forth from 3 different antibiotics in a matter of a month and a half.Also, I smoked for 10 years and recently quit about 2 months ago.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 12, 2008
    • 02:26 PM
    • 0
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  • (having problems logging in) No, no medications. Last year I had a bronchial infection that kept coming back and I switched back and forth from 3 different antibiotics in a matter of a month and a half. Also, I smoked for 10 years and recently quit about 2 months ago. Okay, this is very important - did you take the antibiotic avelox? If so then you may have a torn tendon or ligament causing your pain, directly caused by this antibiotic. Have you had an mri? I would rule this out. This antibiotic, avelox, is VERY scary. Sometimes symptoms crop up weeks after stopping this drug, and no connection is made. I would just want to rule this out. They have just recently put a black box on this med. In the meantime, I recommend seeing a good acupuncturist to help with your pain and inflammation. A good quality pancreatic digestive enzyme can also help with inflammation. Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • August 13, 2008
    • 00:30 AM
    • 0
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  • There are exercises you can do to help drain fluid from your legs. For quite a long time I had a personal trainer who used to have me lie on the floor with my legs extended up the wall for about fifteen minutes a day, generally in the evening. It really did help with ankle and foot swelling.
    sherylv 5 Replies
    • August 13, 2008
    • 04:13 AM
    • 0
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  • Thanks for the replies! I dont recall the 2 antibiotics one started with an A and one started with a B. I'll have to check with the Dr.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 13, 2008
    • 02:55 PM
    • 0
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  • You may still suffer from May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It dos not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain), most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg. If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only sure way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. About 35% of the patients are men. Could this possibly help? Are you in US? The best of luck!
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • August 15, 2008
    • 01:08 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • You may still suffer from May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It dos not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain), most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg. If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only sure way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. About 35% of the patients are men. Could this possibly help? Are you in US? The best of luck!WOW, thank you for that very informative post. Thats more info than anyone has given me on this subject. I am in the US. St. Louis to be exact.
    STL_RunAround 3 Replies
    • August 15, 2008
    • 08:17 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi again,I will tell you a little of my story, so you know what to expect. Even though I am a text-book example of May-Thurner syndrome, it took 10 years before I got my diagnosis. I didn’t get any help from my doctors, I finally diagnosed it myself. It took me 6 moths of studies before I started suspecting May-Thurner. I found Neglen and Raju’s articles on Medline, but it took me a while to understand what they said.I contacted Peter Neglen myself and sent him some of my x-ray pictures. He explained to me that I needed an IVUS exam and finally I ended up in Jackson, Miss. The IVUS pictures showed that there was only 30% left of the vessel space but there was, thanks god, no clot. I had plenty of transpelvis collaterals. I got my stent and gradually started to improve, but since I have been sick for such a long time, I will probably never recover completely. I have had my stent for 3 years now and it is still in excellent condition. After a while a stent can get a little clogged up, then you might have to have it balloon-expanded but mine is still fine. Peter Neglen is Swedish but he has been working in US for many years. I can honestly say that he saved my life, because I was in horrible pain. He and dr Raju are a team and they have by now treated 1 500 patients with this condition. This is by far the most experienced team in the world. They have patients from all over the world. They are at River Oaks Hospital. You are lucky not to be too far from Miss.If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask. I wish you the best of luck!
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • August 15, 2008
    • 10:58 PM
    • 0
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  • Could be from the smoking; you can try this to clear out the toxins if you are brave:http://healingtools.tripod.com/thn10.html It could also be gout in the foot and you might look for "Goutrol" and see if that helps with the pain. You could have nerve pain and then you would need a chiropractor. Good luck.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • August 16, 2008
    • 00:10 AM
    • 0
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  • Hi. I have been diagnosed with May-Thurner Syndrome about 2 years ago, that is when the doctor/radiologist placed my stent in the left iliac vein. It took about 6 months of suffering before I finally had a diagnosis. My suggestion is to check with the radiologist's in your area, it was also the radiologist that diagnosed my May-Thurner syndrome by performing a venogram--when he didn't find any problem in the leg and no clot he then tilted the table at the foot end and allowed the dye to run into my abdomin and that is when he could clearly see the compression of the left iliac vein with the right iliac artery overlaying it. I will tell you my May-Thurner Syndrome is now in full force again even after my iliac vein stent placement though, my left leg is now swelling and my left foot is very swollen, and where the swelling is located my skin is a pale pink color from the blood pooling in the leg and foot. Now I have to see a doctor again for help and now I have been without health insurance due to the 2008 lay-off's in our country nationwide.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • You may still suffer from May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It dos not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain), most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg. If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only sure way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. About 35% of the patients are men. Could this possibly help? Are you in US? The best of luck! Mr. Felsen, I am convinced this is what I have since being on this site; I have had this condition over 2 years and three dopplers later, NSAIDS, antibiotics,compression stockings and 325 mg of ASA daily later-I am still living with it-the only thing different is now I have the lower back pain and the sciatic neuropathy that comes along with it> I am lost> my physician doesn't know what to do but refer me back to the vascular group which diagnosed me with venus reflux and told me to wear compression for the rest of my life. I would like to see Dr. Raju and Dr. Neglen but I am sure my ins won't cover the visit. Mr. Felsen please tell me which tests I need and which specialist will be best for me-I have been everywhere without success.
    mommy03 1 Replies
    • September 1, 2009
    • 07:15 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
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