Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Lack of appetite since birth, now 2yrs..

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 18 Replies
  • Posted By: shauna578
  • September 21, 2008
  • 01:48 AM

My 25 Month old son, is now 19 pounds, 33 inches tall. He was full term and 6 pounds at birth. He has never had an appetite, and been very underweight since 3 months old. I struggled to get him to take his bottles as a baby, and now I continue to struggle to get food in him. He drinks pediasure everyday. I have taken him to several different doctors to see what is wrong with him, with no luck. The latest doctor, suggested a feeding tube. Any suggestions?

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  • Could you measure his head circumference? This link will tell you how http://www.babycenter.com/baby-child-growth-percentile-calculator;jsessionid=3A9EDF5054D133280957FA0FA7D4ECF1.01-04 Length = between percentile 5 and 10 Weight = below percentile 5 He is very small, a feeding tube could help him gain weight, but it is also very important to diagnose the underlying cause of him not wanting to eat. Here are a few possibilities http://symptoms.wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/infant-feeding-problems/poor-growth/weight-loss.htm
    qwertyuiop123 453 Replies
    • September 21, 2008
    • 03:40 AM
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  • My own daughter when young (baby, toddler) was classified as being "failure to thrive".. due to not gaining weight, due to her not being interested in food at all, she was so small and skinny. She went from a chubby 6 month old when she was just on milk.. but wasnt interested in solids at all so things went downhill from about 7-8 mths old (as she hardly took food but was extremely active). At about 19 mths old, she was even hospitalised for 5 days or so while they tried to get her to eat and tried to work out what was wrong with her. They never could work it out. (i guess they did that to make sure it wasnt anything I was doing too). I had a stressful, on and off (abusive) relationship with her father to which we permanently broke up when she was 12-13 mths old and I have always wondered if her eatting issues.. were due to her taking on my stress and it just then manifesting like that for her? You may want to consider if your son could be taking on any of the household members stress. In my own daughters case.. when she was 2/3 yrs.. at one point she was going on that she was fat!!! (which is weird as i dont know where she got that from.. not from me and I wasnt big myself and i didnt see myself as needing to loose weight. She not only as hardly eatting but calling herself fat as well.. unless she was looking for excuses/reasons not to eat?? she was an exceptionally smart child (classified as gifted) and didnt think like a normal child). I dont know if this has been done yet with you and your child.. but we were sent to a dietitian/nutritionist. Who taught me about making foods higher in calories for her.. so that when she did eat a bite, she could get as much as possible out of it (and how too to try to discuse all the things she didnt eat too but the main issue was getting her to eat ANYTHING). If you havent done this already.. you should go and see one for advice.. eg One thing I got taught was adding milk powder to her normal milk.. so it was higher in calories. I was also told to cook her whatever she wanted to encourage her to eat.. so even made separate, special meals for her (to which most of the time she wouldnt eat either). I was also enouraged to give her junk food as basically unless she ate 3 chips (packet chips/crisps her favourite food) .. she wouldnt eat anything all day (except her milk). At one stage at nearly 3.. she was ONLY eatting 3 cold potato crisps per day. .... 3 mouthfuls of something was a lot for her to eat and sometimes all she ate all day (at 2 yrs). My daughter was put on something called "polygoule" (i dont know the spelling) to add calories and also put on medication (I think it was some kind of steriod med??? I doubt if they would do that nowdays) but it had the side effect of making one hungry. She was like living only on her milk, Somewhere just after 3 yrs old.. she suddenly developed an appetite and ended up eatting like any other child. She thou took years to catch up in size (was the tiniest in her class for years) but nowdays (she's grown up now) is taller than I and an average size.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 07:11 AM
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  • Thanks for the info!! We are about to put him in the hospital for 3 days with an NG tube and see what that does.
    shauna578 1 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 04:15 PM
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  • My 25 Month old son, is now 19 pounds, 33 inches tall. He was full term and 6 pounds at birth. He has never had an appetite, and been very underweight since 3 months old. I struggled to get him to take his bottles as a baby, and now I continue to struggle to get food in him. He drinks pediasure everyday. I have taken him to several different doctors to see what is wrong with him, with no luck. The latest doctor, suggested a feeding tube. Any suggestions? Hi Shauna, Have the words "failure to thrive" been mentioned? It sounds like possibly b12 deficiency of which "failure to thrive" is a symptom as is anorexia. Come on over to http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?p=120164#post120164to find out about it. Check the symptoms list against yourself and your child. All three of my children are as deficient as I am. It runs in families.
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 04:55 PM
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  • Shauna:Does he have oral hypotonia? You really didn't say much else about him to know if there could be other causes other than just regular normal child development issues. Ie: did you breast or bottle feed, how is his muscle tone, are there any developmental issues? Did he achieve normal developmental milestones on time or were some late or different than they should have been?. Is there anything else that is out of the ordinary about his development other than that he won't eat? Does he appear to be in distress when eating? You're asking this board so you must have an underlying gut feeling that something else is "not quite right" or you wouldn't ask....the "not quite right feeling" is the one you NEED to listen to, NOT what the doctor says. If you think something is "not quite right" and the feeling comes from from your mother's gut instinct, I STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT YOU PERSUE IT UNTIL YOU GET A DIAGNOSIS AND DON'T ACCEPT A DOCTOR'S BRUSH OFF FOR AN ANSWER. It would be helpful to know if you breastfed or bottle fed and WHY. Did you choose to bottle feed or would he not breast feed? go to : Prader-Willi-Syndrome (www.pwsa.org). or Maybe it's PWS.com. CLASSIC signs of Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) are Early failure to thrive and feeding problems followed by eating and rapid onset of obesity at about 5 yrs. old. In PWS, often times force feeding and tube feeding is necessary in early stage (under 5 yrs). THOSE ARE CLASSIC TRAITS OF PWS. In the second stage of PWS they over-eat. The dysmorphological features of PWS are VERY mild so you may not notice that he has any unusual facial characteristics. PWS has its own "look" (dysmorphological features) but it does not stand out like Down Syndrome that people are more familiar with, so you have to know the look to be able to recognize it otherwise PWS children appear "normal" to the un-trained eye. MOST pediatricians do NOT know the look of PWS or the signs of PWS so they usually never diagnose it at an early stage (under 5). If they do diagnose it at all, it is usually not until perhaps later, at the second stage, when it becomes more obvious. ONLY a geneticist can diagnose it at your child's age. PWS is the only syndrome that comes to my mind with the information you have given. Earling feeding problems, failure to thrive, low birth weight, force feeding and short stature are a CLASSIC SIGN of PWS. From the information you have given us we don't know any more than that so it could be a lot of things. Or he could just be a healthy growing young baby boy. Many genetic disorders have feeding problems. Many medical conditions have feeding problems. All children develop at a "normal" pace unless there are underlying medical issues that are not "normal". A mother INSTINCTIVELY knows if the child is off the charts or if something is wrong. If there is anything far out of the "normal" then do NOT let it go undiagnosed and un-tested regardless of what the doctor tells you. BE YOUR CHILD'S ADVOCATE. When your baby was born was your baby "floppy" (low muscle tone) and not able to bottle or breast feed due to oral hypotonia? WHY do YOU think the baby won't eat? Surely, you have watched him either struggle to eat or act uninterested or in distress during or after eating or SOME KIND OF CLUE...you DO have a gut feeling about what is going on but you are not describing it very well. If you want answers to medical questions, you need to be more descriptive. I really think that ONE reason that people are under-diagnosed and un-diagnosed is that they do not describe ALL symptoms and describe them CLEARLY. Go to a geneticist! If you live near a teaching hospital you should find a good pediatric geneticist there. There can be a lot of causes for a lot of things in early childhood development. Some are normal development and some are not. If your child is way out of range on those developmental charts, then look more closely for a reason why. If your child has SIGNIFICANT feeding issues then look more closely. Sometimes it is not as important to loook at what your child does and does not do, but rather at the way in which the child does what he does do. And if that is not right, then you probably have something going on there. GET A GENETIC WORKUP and FISH study. PWS is on the #15 chromosome and it is a "DE NOVO mutation" which means that it happens for the first time. It does NOT run in families. If it is not PWS, a geneticist can tell you other possible causes because geneticists pretty much see it all. I'd look there first. You just did not give enough information to help think of any other diseases or syndrome diagnoses other than PWS. Maybe gastro or endocrine. Or just a "normal" (for lack of a better word) child who for whatever reason doesn't want to eat much. I don't think that not wanting to eat is of itself anything to worry about. That's why I say you must have other issues that you did not post or you would not be so concerned. You posted classic PWS signs but we need more if you want better answers. If he were my child and it had gone on since birth, I would probably be testing him at this point. As one parent to another, I will tell you that I have a child that took me almost twenty years to diagnose. That was with me ACTIVELY seeking a definitive diagnoses and living in an area where I had some of the best doctors and facilities. I was told over those twenty years by many people and some professionals that maybe I should give up and quit looking for a definitive diagnosis because I might never find an answer. My reply to them was that IF it was out there, I would find it, if it took my lifetime to do so. I was not going to quit and did NOT! I finally, definitevely, diagnosed my child with a very complicated and rare condition. I did a LOT of medical reading. I learned a LOT along the way. The most important thing that I can tell you from my experience, that you can benefit from is that doctors do not know everything and that you are the best advocate for your child. IF you think that your child has something and you know it in your gut, then keep looking because THE DIAGNOSIS IS OUT THERE. Don't let anyone tell you that it is not and if they try to then walk away and keep searching without them. My child has something so rare, that my child is the ONLY person reported in medical literature in the entire WORLD...there is only one and I AM now the ONLY medical expert! If I can ever find a second person on this earth, then I can name a new syndrome. It took me a lot of time to find the answer but I did and so can you if you do not quit. Keep reading and looking on your own. Read all medical literature that you can. Read and read and read medical literature. Talk to other parents and professionals when you can. Soon you will learn that there is a knack to reading medical literature. If your doctor doesn't want to refer you out to a specialist then refer yourself and go anyway. Hopefully you have at least one good doctor who will work closely with you, that is the ideal. You have to be proactive if you want to find answers. Some of you parents of healthy children who are reading this board, ocassionally hear about parents like me who have special needs kids, but you do not understand us and you never will. We are very blessed. We are to be envied for the children we have in our care. However, probably ninety-nine percent of us who have children with rare disorders had to struggle to get diagnoses. For most of us that has been the biggest challenge, not the kids. So I can tell you for a fact that you have to be proactive if you want to find a definitive answer because most doctors usually will not give you one unless you first hand it to them on a silver platter and ask them to test. Shauna, although this is seemingly a feeding issue, but my advise to you is to start with a GOOD pediatric geneticist if things don't get any better.There are an awful lot of things that a geneticist can pick up even when all other tests come back "normal". It could be PWS or maybe not. It is the best starting place that I can send you to start. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, genetics has made tremendous strides over the past 25 years and many answers are right there in the genes. So sometimes you can skip the extra running around to a lot of different doctors and instead, know exactly which doctors to to go to because a lot answers are in the genes and scientists now know what to look for there. If that doesn't go anywhere, then maybe try a pediatric gastroenterologist and a pediatric endocrinologist workup. There could be other underlying issues why your child is not eating but maybe not. So, before you run off and do all that, first ask yourself if you really feel in your heart and gut feeling that something is "not quite right". If you have that gut feeling then do not quit until you get the answer you want and don't let anyone hold you back or try to stop you from looking. At your baby's age it is not out of range to have feeding problems. Look for other signs of abnormal development and IF you see those or have an instinctive mother's gut feeling that something is off then go for it and don't quit until you can come back to this board and tell us all about it. Hopefully, sooner than 20 years from now! Otherwise, relax and be a mom. Most of all and above all else, HAVE FUN WITH YOUR BABY and enjoy each other. Make every day special...even force feedings! Good luck SHAUNA, and best wishes for your baby and his health. God bless you both.
    Failte 1 Replies
    • September 26, 2008
    • 05:11 PM
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  • I have a quick question about this...my son has a lot of the symptoms of PWS EXCEPT he is 8 years old and is average height, with LONG fingers but he DOESN'T WANT to eat at all...hardly....he is so underweight. I just went to the geneticist but he won't give me any answers until the bloodwork comes back. just concerned what it could be. and if he comes back and can't find anything I would like some input about what he could check for incase he didn't check for a certain thing...everything else with PWS fits for my son. Not sure about the facial features tho...he has an oblong shaped head, very very fair skinned..he always looks very pale almost sickly, he is very lathargic, as a baby he had weak suck and hypotonia, he also has absent seizures for which he takes meds for..and his cholestrol is a little high even tho. he does not consume very much food. he is 8 years old and weighs 40 pounds but is 4 foot 1 inch tall. Please Help if u can THANK YOU :)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I know this is an old thread but would really appreciate some feedback and a reply from Shauna578 if your still active on this forum. I have an 18 mth boy who is in a simmilar situation, he has no apetite whatsoever and a team of speaclists who have no clue. He has been tested for just about everything with no outcomes found, he is extremely energetic for a toddler that refuses to eat and is also delayed in speech. All responses welcomed.
    falcon 2 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I know this is an old thread but would really appreciate some feedback and a reply from Shauna578 if your still active on this forum. I have an 18 mth boy who is in a simmilar situation, he has no apetite whatsoever and a team of speaclists who have no clue. He has been tested for just about everything with no outcomes found, he is extremely energetic for a toddler that refuses to eat and is also delayed in speech. All responses welcomed.Hi Falcon,I had very delayed understandable speech. At about 4 years old I was diagnosed with "delayed myelination" which is now known to be a b12 deficiency symptom. You might want to check out that aspect. Does he have sleep disorders? Night terrors?
    Freddd 3576 Replies Flag this Response
  • Appreciate the reply Freddd He is usually a very good sleeper but can experience periods of restlesness which interupts his sleep from time to time, we have not experienced any sleep terrors though. I will also add that we will be testing him for ASD which has been suggested eventhough he doesn't exhibit any true characterics.
    falcon 2 Replies Flag this Response
  • Just a quick update to spark some interest.Not much has changed since my last post except his eating continues to get worse and his sleep has become alittle erratic. He is still a happy and lively little boy with boundless energy eventhough he barely eats anything, it seems he must be surviving on his pedisure plus. His last weigh in had him at no weight gain and still in the bottom 5th percentile for weight, we are scared that if he doesn't get an appetite soon a tube for feeding will be inevitable.Does anyone know of simmilar stories of toddlers who have delayed speech with no apparent appetite but otherwise deemed as developing fine?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I will also add that we will be testing him for ASD which has been suggested eventhough he doesn't exhibit any true characterics. Im concerned on hearing that you are having your 18mth old tested for ASD based on just eatting concerns and delayed speech of 18mth old. My concern stems from the fact that diagnosing ASD isnt done by something like a blood test or anything like that, rather a guess at his age will be made just based on behaviour .. and at 18mths old, it can be VERY HARD to tell unless he has a lot of obvious characteristists eg no eye tactic with people etc. On the Asperger forums .. there have been MANY stories of parents who have gotten children diagnosed with Asperger's who were less then 2.5 yrs old, in which it was later found that the children were in fact just slow starters and didnt have Aspergers at all as all their development by 4 or 5 was completely normal. Then there can be issues with getting a false label off of the child. One major part of the more milder ASD spectrum of Aspergers diagoses is social and lack of social skills.... how on earth can people really guage that in a toddler? (and your son dont sound severely autistic or I think that would be quite noticable). Toddlers can be antisocial and many dont play with peers etc etc anyway.. unless complete lack of eye contact etc you just cant guage a child that ages social skills which are important for diagnoses). It is true there "can" be eatting issues with ASD eg some develop odd eatting behaviours eg will only eat certain things and may only eat a few different kinds of foods they are familiar with or may only eat foods of a certain colour, some wont eat foods of a certain texture etc That kind of thing is a Aspergers trait (but your post didnt hint that he was doing "odd' food habits). No appetite at all probably indicates something else. (One of my daughters is on the Autism spectrum.. she's not the child who had the eatting issue and was failure to thrive thou but my other daugher who genetically etc is healthy. My Aspie daughter eats like a horse.. she used to probably eat more then most children as she loved food).
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
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  • falcon A few other ASD food traits are insisting food is eatten in a certain order, having to have it on a plate in a certain way and lining food up into rows. Some with ASD may not eat as they are that absorbed into whatever they are doing that one cant distract them easily to eat. Their "special interests' are too special to them and are like addictions they may struggle to break away from so pulls them away from normal life stuff eg that could be eatting. It thou should be noticable thou if a child has that cause of not eatting as their obsession with whatever it is, will be noticed. My 2 yr old grandchild (Aspies is highly genetic eg my daughter, my and my father all have it), she probably does have Aspergers. She is odd in ways which do stand out to someone who knows what to watch for (I thou wouldnt get grandchild tested at her age thou due to the amount of 'wrong diagnoses" of this age group). She doesnt make eye contact (thou not all with Aspergers have that issue) and if one does manage after 100 or so pictures of trying to get her looking at a camera one has to ones face.. she appears looking past "throu" the camera and past ..like as looking in distance (Ive only even managed to get two photos of her glancing my way). This is so so different to my other grandchild who from birth.. one can gain my non Aspie trait grandchild to focus and get her to look at a camera...she's only 6mths old and can focus on my face but my other one cant. She has also no awareness of others space eg while running to a piece of playground equipment she'll actually run anyone in her way down making one not being able to leave her side for a moment as she will inattentionally hurt other children if one couldnt be constantly grabbing her (even bowl over kids twice her age.. its like she doesnt aknowledge anyone there in her way). She loves her food (I dont know what percent of ASD children have eatting issues but I dont think it is highly high). She also acts like she has ADHD as she has such a short attention span, one cant even push her on a swing for even a short while as she dont hold her attention for more then a few seconds and she jumps off while its really swinging (no safety sense at all, even for a 2 year old.. all the other toddlers at the park I see capable of sitting on swing). All im trying to really say to you as if it is ASD.. if you are aware of ASD traits.. you should see some noticable ones which really point to ASD and should notice many more as the child gets older and then the lack of social skills stand out. (some experts dont recommend testing for things like Asperger's till a child is at least 3). *Make sure any Autism testing is done with an Autism expert. Where I live one has to have confirmation of it throu a proper assessment being done by TWO different experts who agree before an offical diagnoses is made.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Shauna,My mother tells me that when I was a baby, I would drink about 4 ozs of formula per day. (The entire day!) She tried breastfeeding, and I would lie there with my mouth open, looking all around and not do anything. So she tried the bottle and same thing. They force fed me, and when they were done, I would vomit. (Then both my mother and I would be crying.) She said she would try to convince herself I drank 5 ozs to feel better.By the time they were done with breakfast, lunch would arrive. Anyone else who tried to feed me would have the same experience. My uncle who was a doctor told her that if I was having regular BMs (I guess 1 each day?) and peeing not to worry. But of course she did. As I grew older, I still didn't eat much and would sit there and could take hours. I'd have the food in one cheek and daydream and forget to chew (this I recall). They'd poke at the cheek and I would move the food to the other. (I ate quicker when the food was more appetizing, but not necessarily more.)I think I must have had a small stomach because 3 times during childhood, I ate enough that my stomach hurt so badly and felt so full I literally couldn't move. I had to lie on the floor for about 1/2 hr in pain then I needed to go #2. Two times, it was from my parents insisting I eat. The 3rd time, I did it to myself - but I don't think I ate a lot of food.I grew up in a third world country. There wasn't much the doctors there would have done other than recommend force feeding.So how did I turn out? I was underweight (by U.S. standards) probably my entire life. (I was between 6 and 7 lbs at birth.) At 14, I was a shade under 5' and weighed 75 lbs. I remained there until 20 or so. I gained more weight when I started cooking for myself and eating out. I don't think it affected me intellectually - I graduated from high school in the US in the top 10. Graduated with a B avg from an engineering school. Today, I'm in my 30s, ~88 lbs, mom of 2. My weight went back to 88 lbs after both births. I still don't have much of an appetite. None of my kids fortunately have had an appetite problem. I've given up on gaining weight and I'm still underweight but have accepted it. It is pretty easy for me to maintain my weight. My mom recently told me of how much milk I drank when I was a baby. I was shocked and wanted to do some research on what I might have... but I think maybe I should give it up and enjoy what I do have. The one drawback I have (which I don't know if it's related) is low energy/drive. I do whatever I need to and want to, but not with much zeal. (There was a change from that during pregnancy when I ate tons, so I miss that.)I'm glad my parents didn't put me on medications. I love being small and petite.This is not a recommendation to do or avoid doing anything, just one perspective.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi all, My son was born at 41w4d. He weighed 6lb 12 3/4oz. He was exclusively breastfed for 6 months. He was in the 3-5% for weight and the 25% for height. When was born very sturdy. He would almost support his head since day 1. He used to breastfeed every 1-1.5 hours and he was never a good sleeper. Since day 1, he would sleep 10-12 hours max per day! He breastfed on demand until he was 12 month old, when I got pregnant of my second boy.When we started solids at 6 months, he dropped from his curves, first the height and then the weight. The pediatrician kept telling us that we are short people, so we had a little peanut. He sat by himself when he was 5 months old, he stood up by himself when he was 7 month old and he started walking with assistance when he was 9 month old. He was always very active, so the ped said, that was part of his poor weight gain. I'm from Argentina, so he is bilingual. He sings songs, he runs, he is very advanced for his age. He has always been, meeting milestones before the suggested age. When he was 12 month old and I stopped breastfeeding him, we had to introduce milk or formula. We tried several with no success, even goat's milk. We tried lactose-free dairy products as well, but he would puke, so we decided that he was allergic to milk protein and we gave him almond milk with no problems. At the same time, I wasn't happy with the ped telling us he is just little, so I took him to the GI, nutritionist, speech therapist and endocrinologist. At that time he was choking and puking with anything that wasn't puree and he was puking almost daily or even 2 times per day, anything. He wasn't able to eat any finger food.They did some x-rays and videos, some assessments and he was put under pediasure peptide. We also had to put him on a more strict feeding schedule, since until now, he was snacking or eating every 30-60 min. With all the assessments done, we learned that his anatomy is OK and his thyroids are OK. He was diagnosed with texture aversion, hyperactive gag reflex, milk protein allergy. He also had and still has the anterior fontanel open.He was gaining weight and eating better at daycare than at home. He outgrew most of the issues, so by 16 months he wasn't putking, he was eating finger food, he was drinking regular pediasure. He went to Detroit with dad for a funeral and since he came back in June, he hasn't been eating very well at all.The last time we went to the drs., they suggested that it's behavioral. My son rules the house they said, which is true. They suggested to do an upper endoscopy, but in order to do that he needs to be put under general anesthesia. I did some research and suggested to the dr. to try the acid reflux medication first and they agreed, so we started with Prilosec on 8/3. He hasn't eaten much since then, so not sure if it's working, but most people say it takes 2 weeks to see the effects. His main problem is that he doesn't eat. We tried everything, but never forced him. He was drinking the pediasure, but now not even that. He would drink 3oz pf pediasure per day and that would be all he eats/drinks. We tried purees, crackers, smoothies, fruits, veggies, meat, mac and cheese, sandwiches, pancakes, etc. We keep trying different things different days,etc. He seems not to be hungry. He does get cranky sometimes or even tired, but in general he is super active, in a very good mood, always smiling, very sharp, etc. My husband and I have a very nice relationship and we never yell to him. I would say that we are probably not strict enough with him, but he is such a good boy, that he would listen and do anything we tell him, except for eating of course. He is so mature for his age (almost 18 months, since he was born on 2/14/12) that he has been sleeping in a twin bed since he was 14 months old. Also, we were potty training him, since he was letting us know when he wanted to pee and poop, but we stopped that not to add stress, just in case. We don't believe it's a reaction to my pregnancy since he was experiencing this issue from a long time ago.If the acid reflux medication doesn't work, he will get the upper endoscopy done. They want to discard EE (eosinophilic esophagitis) and then they will treat it as behavioral, suggesting therapy at first and feeding boot camp or tube feeding as the last resort.He is 29" tall and weighs 19lb, that's waaaaaay too little. He is extremely short. I've been doing some research and I will suggest to check for B12 levels as suggested in this forum. He definitely doesn't have PWS or any ASD. If any, he is too aware and he has too good memory, that's why I was trying to avoid the upper endoscopy, since he will remember that for sure... Any other route to take?Thanks a lot!Mariela, mom to Luka almost 18 months old
    mppellegrini 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi,I completely lost all my appetite and interest in food after birth and have friends who have experienced the same thing so I think it's pretty common. For more information : http://www.doctorshealthpress.com
    jacobedward02 10 Replies
    • August 13, 2013
    • 06:38 AM
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  • You should have your children checked for allergies. My sister is allergic to pretty much everything, but rice(had tests done). Her reactions are not what doctors consider allergies. She has an uncontrollable furniture moving stage with hot fudge sundaes, bounces off the wall after being lethargic and given amoxicillin within 10 minutes. She has also been labeled with Bipolar, Oppositional Defiance Disorder, Intermittent Explosive disorder, and her frontal lobe has not fully formed. She is now 19 with an 8 yr. old mentality and never has been a good eater and underweight. She weighed 65 pounds until she was about 15. The shots they give children have been linked to autism, who knows what other side affects could be. Another possibility could be what they are being fed. Genetically Modified foods are not good for our digestive system. When they change our food, the natural balance of that food changes, the enzymes in our bodies cannot break down the proteins causing things such as IBS. Hope this helps!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 22, 2013
    • 00:07 PM
    • 1
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  • Hi, this is going to sound weird but I think I might know what's going on. When I was a toddler I was diagnosed with failure to thrive, just as a few others have said above for their children. I was very underweight for most of my life and I now need reminders to eat as I don't get hungry. I've been trying to find things about this but research has drawn up blanks.
    To help with your kids, my mum viewed my not eating as "well then I'll watch you and you will finish what's on your plate or you can't leave the table." I'm a normal weight now but along with random weight swings I'm also incredibly curious about this and if others have this.
    Anonymous 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • I set a reply earlier about how I experienced the same thing some of you are saying about your children(no hunger, failure to thrive), but I then went and continued research. I found somthing. It's called 2q37DeletionSyndrome. It has connections to lack of hunger, small stature and quite a few other things.
    Anonymous 1 Replies Flag this Response
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