Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

If not ovarian cysts or endo, then what?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 1 Replies
  • Posted By: ByTheLion
  • October 19, 2008
  • 05:28 PM

In late April, I was rushed to the ER for appendicitis. As is a common occurrence, they determined in the ER that my appendix was fine, but I had two ovarian (corpus luteum) cysts (one on each ovary) and fluid from where a third had already ruptured (which was causing the pain). The gyno said I'd be good to go after two days or so, but I ended up essentially on bed rest for 10 days. They had me on vicodin, which relieved the pain, but not completely. I have always had a really high pain tolerance and I go to military school, so I'm used to just pushing through pain anyway, but the fact I was hurting so much really freaked my mom out. The cysts went away naturally. I did have a very small cyst in early August, but I don't know if that was one from before or a different one (my guess is different).

The chronic pelvic pain continued over the summer, so I started on TriSprintec to regulate things since I began having more inconsistencies in my menstrual cycle around January (to include a random period in March - it came two weeks after my normal one, and then I had another period at the "normal" time two weeks after the random one). Menstrual symptoms like cramping, heaviness of flow and length of period have all been getting progressively worse over the past year.

When I came back to school in August, my doctor said it sounded like endo and referred me to a gyno here in town. After doing some research, I was amazed to see a potential answer to other problems I've been having, some of them going on two years: pelvic pain, diarrhea and constipation (off and on) especially during menstruel cycle, low back pain, painful urination and bowel movements (void left by empyting of bladder/pain when attempting to apply pressure), severe fatigue (over the summer I'd sleep 8-12 hours a day, including naps, and still be exhausted). I'm a virgin, but the pelvic exams and ultrasounds I've had have all been excruciating. My first ultrasound was when I had the cysts in April and I almost passed out (this from someone who two days before was given a derivative of morphine in the ER based on symptoms, not due to complaining of pain... they offered it to me 2-3 times and I said I was fine before the guy finally told me he was giving it to me anyway).

My gynecologist decided to go ahead and schedule a diagnostic laparoscopy. I had that on Oct. 10th and I go in tomorrow for the follow up to discuss the complete results. The short report said that he didn't see any obvious signs of endo based on the laparoscopy. It's possible that he may have found something in the meantime from the biopsy, but he was amazed. Based on my symptoms (especially the fact they've been progressive), he was pretty certain he'd find extensive endo. Especially since my mom didn't think to mention to me until about three days before my laparoscopy that "Oh yeah, I had endometriosis in my late 20s. That's part of the reason we had trouble conceiving you!"

I'm sick of going to doctor after doctor and having them say, "Sorry, can't help ya with a diagnosis, put take these pain pills" just to have the pain pills not take away the pain. For my chronic lower back pain, I've been to physical therapy, massage therapy and chiropractic. None of them have been able to help for more than a few hours.

Obviously it'd be really awesome if I don't have endo, but I'm desperate for some answers here. Reading the symptoms, it would explain sooo much of my medical history over the past few years. Are there other conditions that have almost all of the most common symptoms of endo and complications with ovarian cysts?

Thanks in advance.

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1 Replies:

  • This may very well be something else, but there is a vastly underdiagnosed condition called nut-cracker syndrome. It is when the left renal vein is compressed between aorta and the superior mesenteric artery and for each heart beat is “cracked” as a nut in a nut-cracker. With time the vein can react to this compression by producing a sort of scar tissue which leaves even less room for the blood to pass. The symptoms are left flank pain; sometimes there is blood in the urine, sometimes only little which requires a blood test. Since left ovarian vein drains in left renal vein, it can also give pelvic symptoms such as pelvic pain, pelvic venous congestion or pelvic varicose veins. Venography (phlebography) is a way to diagnose it (but it requires a radiologist familiar with this condition), ultrasound is less suitable. It is not easy to treat. So far the severe cases have demanded venous surgery, but now the first cases have been treated with stent placement. Sometimes this condition can improve by itself, if collateral veins form around the compression site. Every time a patient develops a DVT in the left renal vein, this condition should be suspected and ruled out. Good luck with your health!
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • October 19, 2008
    • 07:01 PM
    • 0
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