Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

I'm so lost

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 8 Replies
  • Posted By: fastvision
  • November 3, 2008
  • 03:58 PM

Ok, basically I've searched everywhere for an answer to this, I don't know if I'm going crazy but I think not. I don't know if this is connected but it's just another thing I can't explain which seems to be somewhat connected. When I was young I always used to get this strange experience of everyone talking either really loud or fast, kind of both. So it sort of sounded like people were yelling. This went on and off for ages and I still get it occasionally. But now a thing that happens a lot is that everything I see moves really really fast. It's so weird. I don't know how to explain it but I would everything moves really moves or that I am perceiving even slight movements of everything. For instance if I look at my hand and move it I will see the hand move as a whole but also all the slight twitches in my fingers. If I look at someone walking I will see all the limbs moving and the clothes creasing and straightening etc. If anyone can tell me what's causing this it would be great. I generally don't mind it but if it is pointing to something dangerous is what I'm worried about. I think it could be because one of my friends said she took Ecstasy the other night and everything moves really really fast and people were talking fast and so maybe my brain kind of acts like that or something. I've never taken Ecstasy by the way so it's not that. Thank you!

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8 Replies:

  • You sounds like you're saying everything in your life is sort of amplified, like there's too much noise/movement/activity that doesn't seem to bother other people. This sounds somewhat like Asperger syndrome or an autism spectrum disorder, but I'm reluctant to tell you this because you may be perfectly normal. There are a lot of variations in human beings! This might also be part of ADD. It's really impossible to say what's going on, but as a general rule, such things are usually "normal" unless they interfere with your ability to do things, like focus in school or hold a job, or prevent you from living the kind of life you enjoy.
    aquila 1263 Replies
    • November 3, 2008
    • 05:25 PM
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  • Forgot my password lolYeh I generally go with that rule too. I'm fairly certain I don't have Aspergers but I don't know about ADD. Anyway yeh it doesn't really interfere since I'm kind of interested in it haha
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 4, 2008
    • 05:26 AM
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  • I belive the problem lies either in the occipital area of your brain,responsable for our vision sensation or there may be something with your optic nerve or it`s "stations" in cerebral trunk,mesencephal .A MRI may possible give you an answer
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 5, 2008
    • 03:25 PM
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  • Hi,I don't know if I'm going crazy but I think not.You sounds like you're saying everything in your life is sort of amplified, like there's too much noise/movement/activity that doesn't seem to bother other people. This sounds somewhat like Asperity syndrome or an autism spectrum disorder, but I'm reluctant to tell you this because you may be perfectly normal. There are a lot of variations in human beings! This might also be part of ADD.
    peterworn 8 Replies
    • November 5, 2008
    • 09:59 PM
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  • blaze - That EMF having an effect on our body has been proven wrong time and time again. The two websites you pointed to are based solely on the intention of proving it to be true. Med Stud-eu - Thanx very much for that info, I'll look into it. peterworn - ????
    fastvision 2 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 05:01 AM
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  • Can't edit my post but the mesencephal doesn't seem likely as I don't think it's a problem with my eyes. At least I hope it isn't i already have 3rd nerve weakness, short sighted in one eye I don't need anything else lol! Not sure what a cerebral trunk is because I couldn't find anything about it. But again it's with the optic nerve as you said and I just can't understand how my eyes could be doing this. Or are these "stations" where vision gets interpreted by the brain? Meaning it could change how i see things? I don't know if i want to go straight for MRI right now, really expensive and probably too drastic.
    fastvision 2 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 05:55 AM
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  • Maybe you just see the world through your eyes a bit differently, but unless there are other symptoms included, you may be perfectly normal.
    Anasthasia 22 Replies Flag this Response
  • Okay, let's back up just a bit and see if we can diminish some indirection. First of all, we need to broach the topic of basic physiology. Perceptual references for spatial orientation rely upon two physiological senses, visual field dependence and vestibulo-proprioceptive cueing. In all humans, there is a valid and measurable preference by individuals to rely to a greater extent of one sense versus the other in order to establish and maintain vestibular patency, particularly in the presence of challenging environmental stimuli. Such measurable preference can vary greatly in some instances, yours being one example. In other words, visual field dependence becomes dramatically increased in circumstances where feedback from the vestibular system indicates increasing instability. This would not be at a level that would necessarily produce vertigo, mainly because visual field dependence in this instance would largely be compensatory. It should be noted, however, that this compensation at some point can be saturated based upon the extent of complexity associated with environmental stimuli. In instances of increased visual field dependence, even the most subtle of movements might be detected through awareness as they are cumulatively being processed to maintain vestibular patency. The same would hold true for individuals whose senses are weighted toward vestibulo-proprioceptive cues, which instead of more external feedback, provides a far greater internal perception of the body and limbs in three-dimensional space. A person so fitted might describe a heightened sense of awareness of their body position in the presence of complex environmental stimuli. Does that make sense? See the difference? If you have a prying urge to know more, you might try the journal of vestibular research with the caveat that you bear in mind the distinction between normal variations in vestibular function and its sensory network, apart from pathology associated with vestibular function which the journal centers upon, with the expectation that its audience possesses the clinical knowledge associated with basic vestibular function. It's simply necessary to make the distinction to avoid the pitfall of presuming something is wrong. Incidentally, the historical symptoms you describe regarding sounds is due to hyperacusia. It is not uncommon for patients so afflicted to declare acceleration of sounds as well as intensity, with the former characteristic merely representing a misperception rather than any actual influence. The same holds true where acceleration of visual stimuli is concerned, a misperception rather than actual influence and is caused by a dramatic increase in the number of stimuli independently exciting the visual cortex in order to ultimately produce vestibular equilibrium. Simply put, the greater the number of complex stimuli that the senses respond to, the more stable the vestibular network remains. You'll be just fine. This is not an indication of any type of disease. It's simply important to realize that depending upon the simplicity or complexity of environmental stimuli, your awareness of increasing visual dependence will vary accordingly. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies Flag this Response
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