Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Help diagnose please.

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 17 Replies
  • Posted By: Guardian2008
  • September 22, 2008
  • 03:10 AM

Im a healthy 22 year old male, never had any issues surrounding my health.


Symptoms are:

Anyway here are my symptoms, mind you these come and go, every week it's different story. They even change through the day.



Very stiff neck where i feel it in my head. Like if you turn you head as far as you can and flex your neck muscles. You feel like your neck is a piece of metal. Have this all the time.

Hard to take in breaths, especially when i get nervous.
Have episodes where im in fear and very overwhelmed by everything around me
Feel surges of adrenaline rush through the body, like before one has a panic attack. (Once a week)
Seeing floaters from the corner of my eyes
Head always feels warm
Sensitive to cold. Get cold very easily.
Light/color sensitivity
Tingling feet
Nervous/anxious/scared
Chest pains (not too common but get some through the day)
Breathing trouble (Some episodes thought the day)
Pressure in around the head and right ear (sometimes)
Scared of being scared, if that makes scene
Negative thoughts more negative then positive
Cannot stop obsessing about how I feel. Always thinking about how im feeling

Mind racing. I thinking about one thing, but at the same time thinking about what im thinking while singing verses from a song i heard recently. Mind is on double time.


Stomach starts turning and need to go number two, usually before get surges of fear and panic going through body.

Feel tuned out, not fully myself. Derealization maybe? You know when u watch a movie and they play a dream scene were everything is alittle fuzzy. Thank is my perception most of the time.
Fear of being by myself.
Dizziness, floor spining, the light head, imbalance and confusion (mostly when i wake up in the morning, but get em throught the day too
Feeling of falling. I feel as if im about to fall but aren’t
Very self-conscious basically over analysis and too aware of myself
Constantly thinking there is something wrong with me.
Fear that i might soon die or hurt myself "which quiet honestly i do not have the balls for".

Fear of going insane and loosing control of myself. Which is the scariest of them all.
I also experience skipped heart beats.

And feeling as is there is a bomb inside of me that's about to go off. (Haven' had it much this week)


I have also been to the ER and had a cat scan done, came back negative. Doc said it's anxiety. Also been to Neurologist, she examined me said it's anxiety and possible clonazipam withdraws. Also did EEG, now waiting for result. I just can't to stop thinking there is something wrong with me or that im totally losing it. Lately i've been afraid to go into work because of the way i feel when im there. Please any of your comments would be much appreciated.

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17 Replies:

  • This is panic disorder. Realize that when anxiety reaches a certain level, it is capable of inducing a fight or flight response. This response is based upon an innate reaction to fear and promotes changes in the sympathetic nervous system such as increased epinephrine and subsequently heart rate, blood pressure, redirected circulation, upregulation of sensory activity, vigilence, all of which and more that you experience as symptoms. They are not symptoms of a disease, but merely the body undergoing physiological change as a consequence of a fight or flight reaction. It arises from the unavoidable thought that something dreadful is about to happen, but it's origin is unknown. You can think of the sympathetic nervous system as the gas pedal, accelerating physiological processes in order to provide you with increased ability to either escape a threat or defend yourself from one. Understand that the threat does not have to be real. The brain will react the same to either a real or perceived threat. The parasympathetic nervous system is the brakes, so to speak. Once the threat no longer feels imminent, the parasympathetic nervous system slows the heart rate and respiration, rediverts bloodflow, blood pressure is lowered and the person feels more in a relaxed or baseline mode. Many persons experience palpitations as a consequence of parasympathetic activity under stress or anxiety. Vigilence can cause racing thoughts to the extent that a person feels that they can't hold focus upon any given thought and feels much like the mind is on a runaway train with fragmented thoughts and inability to attend to them. Anxiety disorder can also cause persons to frequently have morbid thoughts of uncontrollable rage or images and thoughts of doing something very bad. This does not represent a lack of control and fears that the person may actually carry the thoughts out are unwarranted. Ruminations are not uncommon and persons describe events such as being unable to get a certain musical tune out of their mind, or alternatively the thoughts and actions which are troublesome to them. The inability to breathe in deeply, or experience what is known as an inspirational breath, is due to both tension of the diaphragm and parasympathetic nervous activity. It can cause some persons to experience air-hunger to the extent that a panic threshold occurs, sometimes feeling as though their throat is closing off, a sensation known as Globus Hystericus. Floaters in the vision of persons with anxiety and panic disorder are quite common and they are formed by a slight separation between the gelatenous vitreous humor of the eye and the wall of the retina, forming small wrinkles that you see as threads or hair-like projections in the vision fields. They do not represent a problem. Muscular tension is one of the hallmark characteristics of anxiety disorder with somatic features and the trapezius muscles are most commonly affected, along with the Rhomboid muscles in the upper back under the scapulae. The chest pain you are experiencing is a phenomenon known as Da Costa's Syndrome and is representative of chest wall pain not associated with any type of heart problem whatsoever. The syndrome was named after a leutinent in the Civil war who noted that a great number of his foot soldiers were experiencing what appeared to be heart attack symptoms, but reasoned that it was impossible for all his men to be having heart attacks. It was later learned that they all shared the common exposure to intense stress and fear on the battlefield, bringing on the symptoms. It is entirely harmless. Derealization and depersonalization are also common manifestations of intense anxiety disorder and panic disorder. It arises from the blunting and other dysregulation of the sensory system. It is also common to experience diarhhrea, constipation or alternating versions in the presence of stress or anxiety disorder. The parasympathetic nervous system innervates the GI tract as the gastric nerve and is responsible for inducing GI activity and bowel movement. If you are nervous and or frightened, the parasympathetic response will encourage evacuation (bowel movement). All of these symptoms, which are merely normal physiological responses to fear, are arising in a context where the fear is not real, but rather only perceived. It typically brings about health anxiety because the person tends to generally feel ill and fatigued much of the time, with little energy but yet at the same time feeling as though something inside is racing or wanting to burst free. The dizziness and sense of falling is due to disturbance of the vestibular system, which controls our sense of balance. You're going to be fine. There is nothing actually physically wrong with you and you do not have a disease of any kind. My suggestion is to get a referral from your primary care physician to see a therapist who is trained to deal with anxiety and panic disorders and they can help you by using cognitive-based therapy and other methods to alter the manner in which you are perceiving threats that don't exist and alter thinking patterns which are negatively affecting you. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 03:14 AM
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  • I took think that your main issue there is anxiety. You should see someone about that. Dizziness, floor spining, the light head, imbalance and confusion (mostly when i wake up in the morning, How's your BP? that part of your post esp when you say it's mostly when you wake up in the morning.. sounds like a bit of low Blood pressure going on? (please note.. if it is this, the low BP isnt harmful.. it may just mean.. not to get up too quickly from bed)
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 03:57 AM
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  • Well, EEG results came back normal. With which i instantly felt better for the rest of the day. Also forgot to mention that i bad ablood test done couple months back which also came back negative. I seems like what is going on with me i like a different state of mind. By the way, i've never had any of these symtoms intil i came of clonazipam. That's when everythiing statrted going down hill. Previsoule i only had minor social anxiety issues. VERY MINOR!
    Guardian2008 4 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 05:21 PM
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  • Im a healthy 22 year old male, never had any issues surrounding my health. Symptoms are: Anyway here are my symptoms, mind you these come and go, every week it's different story. They even change through the day. Very stiff neck where i feel it in my head. Like if you turn you head as far as you can and flex your neck muscles. You feel like your neck is a piece of metal. Have this all the time. Hard to take in breaths, especially when i get nervous.Have episodes where im in fear and very overwhelmed by everything around meFeel surges of adrenaline rush through the body, like before one has a panic attack. (Once a week)Seeing floaters from the corner of my eyesHead always feels warmSensitive to cold. Get cold very easily.Light/color sensitivityTingling feetNervous/anxious/scaredChest pains (not too common but get some through the day)Breathing trouble (Some episodes thought the day) Pressure in around the head and right ear (sometimes)Scared of being scared, if that makes sceneNegative thoughts more negative then positive Cannot stop obsessing about how I feel. Always thinking about how im feeling Mind racing. I thinking about one thing, but at the same time thinking about what im thinking while singing verses from a song i heard recently. Mind is on double time. Stomach starts turning and need to go number two, usually before get surges of fear and panic going through body. Feel tuned out, not fully myself. Derealization maybe? You know when u watch a movie and they play a dream scene were everything is alittle fuzzy. Thank is my perception most of the time.Fear of being by myself. Dizziness, floor spining, the light head, imbalance and confusion (mostly when i wake up in the morning, but get em throught the day too Feeling of falling. I feel as if im about to fall but aren’tVery self-conscious basically over analysis and too aware of myselfConstantly thinking there is something wrong with me.Fear that i might soon die or hurt myself "which quiet honestly i do not have the balls for". Fear of going insane and loosing control of myself. Which is the scariest of them all.I also experience skipped heart beats. And feeling as is there is a bomb inside of me that's about to go off. (Haven' had it much this week) I have also been to the ER and had a cat scan done, came back negative. Doc said it's anxiety. Also been to Neurologist, she examined me said it's anxiety and possible clonazipam withdraws. Also did EEG, now waiting for result. I just can't to stop thinking there is something wrong with me or that im totally losing it. Lately i've been afraid to go into work because of the way i feel when im there. Please any of your comments would be much appreciated. Hi Guardian, How long were you on the clonazapam? How much per day and how did you taper it? A too fast withdrawal can cause an awful lot of your symptoms and they can last for years. How long have you been off? Another withdrawal effect of too fast withdrawal with clonazapam is seizures and death. That tends to peak at about 2 weeks following discontinuance.
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 05:32 PM
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  • I was also on clonazipam for 1 month at .25 in the mornind and .25 at night. Had some short term memory issues so i stopped abruptly. Went fine for a week an then had a panic attack at work so i went back on it at .125 ml each day but sufferend panic attacks at work for one week. but was fine the following monday. 2 weeks later me and my g/f went to a bar and i suffered an anxiety attack and havent been feeling right sence. Been one and half month sence i took any clonazipam. Still feeling like ****.
    Guardian2008 4 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 06:48 PM
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  • I was also on clonazipam for 1 month at .25 in the mornind and .25 at night. Had some short term memory issues so i stopped abruptly. Went fine for a week an then had a panic attack at work so i went back on it at .125 ml each day but sufferend panic attacks at work for one week. but was fine the following monday. 2 weeks later me and my g/f went to a bar and i suffered an anxiety attack and havent been feeling right sence. Been one and half month sence i took any clonazipam. Still feeling like ****. That does indeed sound like protracted abstinance syndrome. http://www.geocities.com/BenzoBusters/symptoms.htm can tell you all about it. The only way I know of to get rid of them is to go back on the clonazapam and then taper slowly. Also, some folks have found some degree of relief with methylb12 plus cofactors. http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?p=120225#post120225will take you to a b12 discussion where you can find outr what brands work etc.
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 07:07 PM
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  • Well I checked the site and it does list a mojor list of symtoms that i am having. I do wonder sometimes whether im losing it! But for crying out loud how long do they last?
    Guardian2008 4 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 07:28 PM
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  • Guardian2008... you're a hypocondriac... that's why you're suffering from those ANXIETY symptoms.
    heartpain 5 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 08:44 PM
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  • Well that' funny cuz i never self diagnosed myself with any diseases. And never had any panic issues utill i took the last dose clonazipam. Last thing i am is hypocondriac.
    Guardian2008 4 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 10:09 PM
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  • The dosage of clonazapam mentioned in the posting would not cause any sort of protracted withdrawl and it was certainly not taken long enough (1 month) for this to be the case at all. Again, I'm suggesting here that this is panic disorder and under the proper kind of treatment, you can experience abatement of the symptoms. While manypersons who experience physical symptoms of anxiety and panic disorder request to undergo numerous diagnostic tests, the results tend to be conclusively negative. Physical symptoms are not a direct correlate with physical disease. Your symptoms do not suggest physical pathology as an underlying cause. I'm constrained to point out that some evidence of symptoms of anxiety disorder must have been present prior to treatment with clonazapam in order for your doctor to have prescribed it. As for the member consistently making posts that every person at the forum is actually suffering from cellular phone poisoning and electrosensitivity, I must point out that there are historical documented records that people have been contracting the illnesses being described on this forum for several hundred years before the advent of the cell phone, or even electricity. What, pray tell, would have been the underlying cause in all those cases throughout history? Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • September 23, 2008
    • 11:04 PM
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  • The dosage of clonazapam mentioned in the posting would not cause any sort of protracted withdrawl and it was certainly not taken long enough (1 month) for this to be the case at all. Again, I'm suggesting here that this is panic disorder and under the proper kind of treatment, you can experience abatement of the symptoms. While manypersons who experience physical symptoms of anxiety and panic disorder request to undergo numerous diagnostic tests, the results tend to be conclusively negative. Physical symptoms are not a direct correlate with physical disease. Your symptoms do not suggest physical pathology as an underlying cause. I'm constrained to point out that some evidence of symptoms of anxiety disorder must have been present prior to treatment with clonazapam in order for your doctor to have prescribed it. As for the member consistently making posts that every person at the forum is actually suffering from cellular phone poisoning and electrosensitivity, I must point out that there are historical documented records that people have been contracting the illnesses being described on this forum for several hundred years before the advent of the cell phone, or even electricity. What, pray tell, would have been the underlying cause in all those cases throughout history? Best regards, J Cottle, MD I agree with most everything you say except "The dosage of clonazapam mentioned in the posting would not cause any sort of protracted withdrawl and it was certainly not taken long enough (1 month) for this to be the case at all" It might be a low proabability occurrance, 1:1000 maybe, or maybe more, but it can and does happen. I've seen lot's of low probabilty occurrances, each of them only once or twice. On the internet there tends to be a certain concentrating factor. On a neurological forum for instance one finds lot's of people with low probability occurrances. The high probability situations are dealt with everyday by the health care providers. I have found in the 13 years I've been helping people with their withdrawal problems, that more often than not, that going back on a small dose of a shorter halflife benzo (prescribed for them by their physician) will relieve such reactions pretty quickly and then have a quick minitaper, leaving them comfortable and not having these reactions, whatever the actual cause of the reactions. If a person has a relatively long serum halflife, both valium and clonazapam can definitely remain in the system long enough from a single dose to cause a usually very small amount of accomodation; more if it is reaccomodation. Taking it for a month is definitely enough to cause some accomodation. It takes only a small amount of accomodation to cause withdrawal signs, both normal and protracted. If a person has a 50 hour serum halflife, 10 halflifes will generally give full clearance. Ten halflifes is 500 hours and is a little more than 20 days, and we are talking twice that. I know it is at the extreme tail of probability but I am personally aware of one case in which a single dose of valium caused abstinance seizures two weeks later. I personally have single dose reaccomodation with Valium that causes severe headaches and muscle spasms at the two week mark that go on and on if I don't then take a dose and earlier discomforts starting at about 7 days. A short minitaper when the discomforts start prevents anything more serious and usually puts an end to things generally within a few weeks, for the last mg of valium equivalent. Very few need anything longer than that for the last mg if the previous taper had been slow enough. I'll be the first to admit that I have not yet (and maybe never) healed neurological damage of known and perhaps unknown types which might be a factor in making me hypersensitive to many things. This has decreased as I've been healing these past 5 year but some such reactions still occur. And I don't know about this young man except what's posted here. I do have to say plenty of people have shown up with similar "impossibilities" through the years and have responded positively to a short taper. Protracted withdrawal does not require either a large dose or a long period of accomodation though both of those increase the probability. Considerinmg the cold turkey experience, the anxiety at one week there and then starting up again i would be inmclined to sayrebound symptoms. Rebound symptoms are usually those had previously but often exagerated. Panic reactions are definitely on the menu of rebound possiblities and they get worse with repetition. The severity of such rebound does not tie to quantity or duration in any firm fashion though it tends to get worse with both increasing quantiity and duration.
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • September 24, 2008
    • 01:16 AM
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  • I am a 52 year old female who suffered the exact same symptoms as you from the age of 22 to 35. Fear of death, trouble getting my breath, floaters, etc. Did not believe any doc who told me it was anxiety. I actually wrote a letter (to no one) bemoaning the fact that there was something seriously wrong with me that no one could dianose. Spent $$$$$$$$ on emergency room visits......I thought my veins looked too big( blood clots), a bruise that appeared from nowhere (leukemia), stiff neck and shoulders (meningitis), constipation (colon cancer) diarrhea (colon cancer) weight gain (thyroid cancer) trouble swallowing (throat cancer) and on and on and on. During a massage (to help with the meningitis), in casual conversation the masseusse mentioned a board certified doctor who specialized in thyroid disorders, identified more by reverse reflex than blood test. This method was developed by Dr. Arthur Coddington of Emory university school of medicine in Atlanta, GA. I saw Dr. Coddington, he did bloodwork and the reflex tests. Though the bloodwork cam back low-normal, the reflex was so slow he started me immediately thyroid replacement therapy. I'll never forget him telling me, "This will change your life" as he handed me the script.It has changed my life. Dr. Coddington is long dead, but I continue to see Dr. Michael Milton of Advanced Medicine in ******g GA. who studied under Dr. Coddington. I no longer have any of the symptoms listed above, and frankly, now I laugh about the constant panic I was in. It is like it was another lifetime, happened to a different person.It has been 17 years, and I have a real life now. Please try this one last thing. Google Dr. Coddington or "reverse reflex testing" or Dr. Milton.Good luck and God bless you.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 24, 2008
    • 06:57 PM
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  • Okay, a couple of points need clarification here. To Freddd: Persons don't posess serum half-life, the medications do. While sensitivity to certain drugs can vary from person to person, the half-life of the medication itself, which represents the time necessary for 50% of the drug to be eliminated from the body, is an independent factor from a person's reaction to the therapeutic effects. There are certain pre-existing medical conditions and medications which can also affect the drug's efficacy or the person taking it, but the characteristics of pharmaceutical drugs themselves are not altered between persons. To Blaze: My "job" as a physician has nothing to do with any requisite to make sense or logic of your posting. I have observed your postings canvasing the entire forum and regardless of a person's complaint, they either have lyme disease or cellular phone poisoning in your opinion. My place here is not to challenge your own beliefs, but I'm constrained to point out that illness and disease does not follow such a narrow path. I have visited the links that you've posted concerning discussions about cell phone toxicity and lyme disease, but the opinions and references being made on those sites are not universal and do not apply to all human illness and disease, nor any disease for that matter. There is presently no scientific evidence to support the notion that cell phones are causing all of the illnesses claimed. In fact, the same argument was born during the advent of electricity. There are indeed cases of lyme disease wherein chronic systemic illness has manifested, but this occurs only in geographical zones where lyme-carrying tics are endemic and is far more rare than what your postings would suggest. I'm sorry, but having been in practice for more than 39 years, I'm afraid that your argument doesn't hold water at all in my professional opinion. Best regards, J Cottle, MD
    JCottleMD 580 Replies
    • September 25, 2008
    • 10:24 PM
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  • Hi Dr Cottle, Persons don't posess serum half-life, the medications do. While sensitivity to certain drugs can vary from person to person, the half-life of the medication itself, which represents the time necessary for 50% of the drug to be eliminated from the body, is an independent factor from a person's reaction to the therapeutic effects. There are certain pre-existing medical conditions and medications which can also affect the drug's efficacy or the person taking it, but the characteristics of pharmaceutical drugs themselves are not altered between persons. True, while the person doesn't have a serum half life the medication in their bloodstream does. However, just precisely what that serum halflife is does vary considerably; 17 to 56 hours for the med in question in one reference without a statement of mean and standard deviation or median and maximum/minimum. Oxycodone for instance, with a serum halflife of about 3.5 hours +- approx 1 hour SD, has a serum halflife range in humans from about 1.2 hours to over 50 hours, a 40:1 ratio from minimum to maximum serum halflife. Even at 17-56 hrs there will likely be a decreasing number of persons falling even farther and farther out along the tail. I don't know what the absolute extremes might be. Further, those with a longer serum halflife will generally fall into the theraputic zone for longer than those with shorter serum halflife, especially with short halflife medications. The effects of pharmaceutical drugs varies tremendously amongst persons as do side effects. And it may be that we are just quibbling about semantics. In your practice you most likely go with the treatments that will be relatively correct for the majority of people sitting in front of you. That works well for the majority of patients, hopefully. However, the other side of that coin is that some percentage of patients don't respond to one medication or another at all how one might expect for all sorts of often very complicated reasons. I don't know Blaze's own story. If I believed that I was being adversely affected in noticable health related ways by backround electromagnetic radiation I would sleep in a Faraday cage to see if that had any effect. Repeat periods in and out of cage and see if there are any consistant differences. I am inclined to experiment to test an hypothesis. Because of inverse squares virtually all the energy in the electromagnetic spectrum reaching us is generated within a few feet of us; everything that uses electricity like the computer, calculators, microchips, cordless or cell phones, microwave ovens, transformers, wiring in our houses etc. Go primative camping in the mountains or desert or somewhere miles away from anything generating EMR and test the effects. There are people living in remote cabins in Montana without electricity (or lots of chemicals, depends upon the person) performing that experiment. I don't know if they get better or not. Have they ever been studied? Blaze, an inventor named Royal Raymond Rife back in the 30s, had two major inventions, a most unusual microscope that wasn't understood and an electromagnetic device generating specific frequencies that was supposed to make parasites, bacteria and even viruses self destruct at certain frequencies, specific for each organism. I saw a report of something similar a few weeks ago except that the frequencies are much higher. There is a significant market on the internet for "Rife Ray" devices. Ray Rife invented the Rife Ray; nice symmetry, don't you think? Electromagnetic radiation generators became popular because of Nikoli Tesla who invented alternating current generators etc, broadcast power and radio and a whole lot else. That was only in the 1890s. Before that for a very few years there was telegraph and telephone and DC. Prior to 1850 or so lightening was the only significant generator of radio noise on the earth. So we don't have to go back very far for a virgin EMR environment. Lot's of people had parasites then and cancers and diseases of every description. None of these things are recent. Good luck
    Freddd 3576 Replies
    • September 26, 2008
    • 02:22 AM
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  • Guardian,Get tested for Lyme (you may have be tested more than once over a period to time since Lyme doesn't always show up right away) and thyroid issues. Matter of fact if your insurance covers it, get a full blood work up, make sure it covers vitamin and mineral levels also.Do the work up to help put your mind at ease. If everything comes back normal then listen to Dr. Cottle. Your symptoms are classic Panic Disorder, for which I have had for many years.Panic attacks can come out of know where. Such as when "sitting in your living room, calmly watching Letterman - and suddenly breaking into a sweat, experiencing palpitations" and other symptoms. Having a case of the jitters before giving a public speech IS NOT a panic attack, if it was, believe me, the speech would never be given. Panic needs know reason to attack although there are contributing factors that make the "attack" easier for the panic to lay on us such as being overtired (big one for me), hormones, stress, and sometimes just daily life getting us down.There are no real causes for panic disorder. I see a Psychopharmacologist (not a therapist, just a doctor who listens to my symptoms of panic and works with me on what medication works the best and at what dose) who has worked on studies that physiologically link different types of heart murmurs to panic disorder (I have a murmur from my mitral valve). The VERY basic of that being if your heart has an "extra beat" when it races, your brain may incorrectly recieve the signal as "trouble" and in comes the horrid "fight or flight" response. I'm not a doctor so don't take me verbatim on that explanation but that is what I garnered from it when my doctor was explaining it to me.Along with seeing the Psychopharmacologist, I did see a psychotherapist. There were no deep dark feelings from childhood, I was never abused or neglected, etc... but it wasn't until I started seeing him that I realized how wonderful it was to go to his office and sit in my chair and lay out the burden my past week, knowing that anything I told him, he could never legally (unless I told him that I was going to hurt myself or someone else...as in murder or suicide...NOT "my kid was driving so crazy I felt like slapping him off the back of his head") tell anyone else. Nor did he ever judge me for some of the crazy things I said. But what he did do is help me to use some behavioral-cognitive therapy when I felt a panic attack coming on (it also works wonderfully on those negative ruminating thoughts!). Learning those useful strategies and finding the right medication and correct dosage (don't get discouraged, it does take a while at times) has saved my life.Don't get riled up reading all these posts, try to stay calm, think positively (or repeat positive thoughts over & over in your head until they block out the negative ones) get the medical tests done that you & your physician feel necessary and if then if you choose, go see a therapist and/or a Psychopharmacologist and put your mind at ease. Become empowered over your own health and keep a positive outlook. It is truly amazing the power of our minds....both good and bad, so lets work on the good!Take care and good luck,Alisonps...as for the Klonopin (clonazepam) withdrawals...everybodys chemistry is different. What may work for you may not work for someone else. That's not to say that groups of people don't feel simillar effects, they do, but not everyone in the world who may take the same medication will. Maybe you just need to taper off the klonopin at a slower pace. Also, you mentioned that you never had these symptoms until you started coming off the klonopin...then why were you on it? Even general everyday anxiety contains at least one symptom of a panic attack, but maybe at a lower severity. Why have you decided to come off it? If it's because you don't want to take medications, you need to ask yourself "would a diabetic stop taking his/her insulin?" Just as diabetes is a medically recognized disease, Panic disorder is a medically recognized disorder and for successful health they both need to be treated!
    alison352 4 Replies
    • September 26, 2008
    • 04:30 PM
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  • Okay, a couple of points need clarification here. To Blaze: My "job" as a physician has nothing to do with any requisite to make sense or logic of your posting. I have observed your postings canvasing the entire forum and regardless of a person's complaint, they either have lyme disease or cellular phone poisoning in your opinion. My place here is not to challenge your own beliefs, but I'm constrained to point out that illness and disease does not follow such a narrow path. I have visited the links that you've posted concerning discussions about cell phone toxicity and lyme disease, but the opinions and references being made on those sites are not universal and do not apply to all human illness and disease, nor any disease for that matter. There is presently no scientific evidence to support the notion that cell phones are causing all of the illnesses claimed. In fact, the same argument was born during the advent of electricity. There are indeed cases of lyme disease wherein chronic systemic illness has manifested, but this occurs only in geographical zones where lyme-carrying tics are endemic and is far more rare than what your postings would suggest. I'm sorry, but having been in practice for more than 39 years, I'm afraid that your argument doesn't hold water at all in my professional opinion. Best regards, J Cottle, MD Bless you Doctor...:D
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • September 27, 2008
    • 02:22 AM
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  • Hi, Guardian. I'm not a doctor, but, do you have low blood pressure? If so, please look up hypotension; it can cause some of your symptoms. Good luck. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypotension
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 2, 2008
    • 07:17 PM
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