Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Foot swelling, leg pain, inflammed toes

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 11 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • December 13, 2008
  • 10:32 AM

Hello,

I am a 24yr old female and for about 4 months now I have been getting swelling in my left foot. It started after I had spent the evening sat down at my laptop. When I stood up I had pain on the inside of my leg just below the knee and pain behind my toes when I tried to walk. The area directly behind my toes was also swollen.
It didn't get any better so I visited my GP who told me to put ice on it and rest it - he thought it was tendonitis. This helped but didn't clear it up so I went back - told me he couldn't do anything for me and I should just rest it.

After a few weeks the pain went away (in both areas) but the swelling persisted and gradually spread to my ankle and very lower leg......another trip to the doc. Saw a different one this time and she took a blood sample. She suggested gout/pseudo gout. The blood test came back negative for everything but she put me on naproxen. This seemed to help for a while and the swelling went down but after a few weeks of taking it they had no effect (apart from messing up my concentration).

So, I had another trip to the docs and this time they changed my medication to diclofenac. This worked as well as the naproxen but without the side effects. When I had finished my medication and nothing had changed I was referred to a rheumatologist. He decided I had flexible joints and that I must just be over flexing them and that he would like to referred me to a physio.

That is where I am at now. No physio appointment yet and the other day my toes went purple.

I have a history of swelling in my other foot but over the past 2 years that has settled down. It does still swell but not as much as it used to or anywhere nearly as much as my left foot. My heart had a random beat thing going on where it sometimes does an extra beat, this usually happens daily but my doc hasn't done anything about it. The swelling in my foot has settled down to the front of my foot again and the ankle hasn't swollen for a while but 2 of my toes are permanently inflammed and my little toe is really really sore. The skin on my toes is really red and both my feet seem to get hot really easily at the moment and then tingle. Its horrible, feels kind of burny.

I am planning on going back to my docs next week but if anyone has any suggestions that I could talk to him about I would be really grateful. Its permanently painful and I want to clear it up.

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11 Replies:

  • Although your sx aren't classic,I would be concerned about a deep vein thrombosis,especially if you are on birth control pills and smoke.Does this apply to you?
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 02:08 PM
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  • Never smoked and not on the pill. my gp did consider DVT briefly. My swelling goes down if I massage it.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 03:38 PM
    • 0
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  • Did I miss it, or has no one ordered an x-ray of the foot/ankle? That would definitely be something to look into. You could have a stress fracture of one of the small bones in your foot, which is not uncommon, and doesn't necessarily have to be related to a specific injury. If the x-ray is negative or inconclusive, I would ask for a triple phase bone scan to rule out CRPS/RSD. The color/temp changes and weird sensations could be related to that, even though it is less likely. Do the nails on that foot or the hair on that leg grow differently from the opposite extremity? That is another sign of CRPS. If it is indeed CRPS/RSD (these are interchangeable terms for all practical purposes), it needs to be treated right away in order to have a good outcome.
    jenn96rn 14 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 04:32 PM
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  • I agree with jenn96rn regarding x-rays.
    richard wayne2b 1232 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 04:56 PM
    • 0
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  • I have no firm oppinion about the cause, but here are some things that have helped such: Edema(lower leg swelling) Horse Chestnut, Butcher’s Broom, Gotu Kola, digestive enzymesFluid Retention Dandelion Root Extract BioCleanse or IonCleanse foot bath(Epsum salt with ionizer) I have an IonCleanse (ionizer) foot bath unit that is primarily used for toxics detox but is very effective at relieving edema, etc. My father has this problem chronically, fluid retention in ankles, and it works well for him. My son has done Judo and gotten beaten up by big guys/bruised badly and it relieves his edema. My wife has also had edema/swelling in ankles and it relieves hers. You can find these by web search. In general for general inflammation problems, Theaflavin extract from Black Tea (or drink lots of black tea) as well as EGCG extract from green tea are very effective at relieving inflammatory conditions. Toxic metals such as mercury are a common cause of inflammation and detox helps in this case, as well as from inflammation caused by other toxic exposures. www.flcv.com/inflamhg.html
    berniew1 37 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 07:07 PM
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  • Yes, it sounds like a gouty thing (even though the lab work was negative), unless you have a cyst behind your knee. I have used "goutrol" and swear by it. Google it and see if it helps. Hopefully, you have had it x-rayed by now. Watch your diet.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 09:16 PM
    • 0
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  • If nothing of the above helps, I would insist on an ultrasound exam to rule out DVT. This to prevent postthrombotic syndrome. It can be a DVT even if you're not on the pill. There are many atypical DVTs missed by doctors with dreadful consequenses. If everything else is ruled out and there is no DVT, it can be May-Thurner syndrome. It is when the right iliac artery compresses the left iliac vein against the spine. This causes the blood to congest in the left leg because it can not normally pass the compression on its way back to the heart. It does not necessarily results in the pain at the compression site (if it does it gives a lower back pain); most often it causes pain or swelling or both in the left leg. If you have a compression like this, after a while your circulatory system is trying to develop alternative veins. They are called collateral veins. Most often there are transpelvis collaterals (horizontal ones from left to right in pelvis), but some patients can develop them near the spine or even inside it. Then it can give pressure on nerves and give numbness and tingling sensation in legs. Another typical symptom is ambulating pain, the pain moves around depending on where the pressure is high at the moment. This condition is vastly underdiagnosed. It is impossible to discover with ultrasound and even difficult to discover with venography (phlebography). The only certain way to discover it is by means of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) where the probe is inside the vein. The best research has been done by Neglén and Raju in Jackson, Miss. The treatment is to put a stent inside the vein at the site of the compression. The typical patient is a young – middle-aged woman, previously healthy where the doctors have not found other explanation for the symptoms. If left untreated, there is a big risk of thrombosis either at the compression site in the left common iliac vein or in the left leg. Good luck! I hope they soon find out what is wrong!
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 11:14 PM
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  • Thanks for all your suggestions. Definitly helpful and I will look in to them all. My gp said he thought it was pointless doing an xray when I first started visiting him as there was no pain when he manipulated my foot. Hopefully I will get an appointment next week and see if I can get an xray.Thanks again. :)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 13, 2008
    • 11:15 PM
    • 0
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  • Saw my GP, got a podiatrist referral for foot beds and told to take ibuprofen or more diclofenac for the inflammation. Hmmm. I told him my toes went purple and they get very painful and he didn't seem to care - moved house so changing GP. Might get a better result.I even took a letter in that a podiatrist wrote in 06 saying that if the swellng for worse my circulation should be investigated - he took no notice of this and saw the notable thing as seeing a podiatrist again. Makes me a little bit grumpy that he seemingly can't be bothered. Oh well!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 23, 2008
    • 00:36 AM
    • 0
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  • did you get checked for diabetes???
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • December 23, 2008
    • 07:11 PM
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  • No, I haven't. I can go to a pharmacy and get checked with them I think. Will look in to that after Xmas.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 24, 2008
    • 09:50 PM
    • 0
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