Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

fingernails- flat, wide, with pink lines on nail bed

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 6 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • June 6, 2010
  • 02:56 AM

I was born with spoon shaped nails and had a problem with my kidney. The doctors said that the problem with my kidney disappeared soon after I was born but my scalp was also producing puss that lasted for about a year. My nails are now completely flat as well as small/wide as apposed to long and narrow. They're very soft and bend easily. Dark pink lines have recently appeared horizontally on the nail bed and some have slowly changed shape into a wavy pattern.

My toe nails are completely flat as well. Very small, brittle, and a few are spoon shaped. My pinky toe nails barely exist at all.

I've been to my family doctor, a dermatologist, and a nutritionist but I cannot seem to get a valid diagnosis from anyone.

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6 Replies:

  • I studied nails and nail health is collage. From my notes "Spoon nail - Treatment is increase iron and B12. Is can be due to an anemia condition" i guess thou that you've had your iron checked??
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks for replying!I did have my iron checked and everything seems to be fine. I have no idea what it could be.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks for replying! I did have my iron checked and everything seems to be fine. I have no idea what it could be.Nails and Trichonella came to my mind.However I am guessing that you have splinter hemorrhages so I looked it up for you and copied and pasted belowSplinter hemorrhages are tiny lines that run vertically under nails. Splinter hemorrhage is a nonspecific finding and can be associated with subacute bacterial endocarditis, scleroderma, trichinosis, Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, antiphospholipid syndrome:659, and trauma. At first they are usually plum-colored, but then darken to brown or black in a couple of days. In certain conditions (in particular, infective endocarditis), clots can migrate from the affected heart valve and find their way into various parts of the body. If this happens in the finger, it can cause damage to the capillaries resulting in a splinter hemorrhage.There are a number of other causes for splinter hemorrhages. They could be due to hitting the nail ("trauma"), a sign of inflammation in blood vessels all around the body ("systemic vasculitis"), or they could be where a bit of cholesterol has got lodged in the finger's capillaries. Even if a patient does have infective endocarditis, probably 5 in every 6 patients won't have splinter hemorrhages. However you say yours are pink so hopefully none of this applies
    chrismia 159 Replies Flag this Response
  • I googled both Nails and Trichinella as well as Splinter hemorrhage but my lines don't seem to match those.The lines on my nails follow the shape of the nail horizontally and are almost the same color as the nail, just a little bit darker.Thank you for the information though!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I googled both Nails and Trichinella as well as Splinter hemorrhage but my lines don't seem to match those.The lines on my nails follow the shape of the nail horizontally and are almost the same color as the nail, just a little bit darker.Thank you for the information though!---------------------------------------I am interested if you ever got anymore information on this because I noticed the same thing about a month ago, on the nail bed of both big toes, and it has been bothering me ever since. T
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • pik, Just wanted to let you know you are not alone on this. My husband's toenails are spoon shaped (but not his fingernails), and both of our children have the same spoon-shaped toenails. All 3 of them have teeny-tiny little nails on their pinky toes. Spoon-shaped nails can indicate the following diseases: Iron deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis, Raynaud’s disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, trauma, and nail-patella syndrome. Neither my husband or children have any of those that we are aware of, so I'm thinking it's just one of those things that makes them unique :)Let us know if you find any other answers to what might be causing this! Thanks, APRN
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 8, 2010
    • 05:35 AM
    • 0
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