Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Fatigued, cognitive and neurological problems? Taken a flight?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 4 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • November 10, 2008
  • 04:46 PM

Not so much looking for help, but offering a possible answer, as many of the treads here seem to have familiar symptoms. If you have some of the following symptoms and fly regularly, or became ill after a particular flight, it might be worth reading on, as many fellow sufferers I know had no idea what was making them ill.


Aerotoxic Syndrome symptoms (any number may be observed)

Chronic fatigue
Blurred or tunnel vision
Shaking and tremors
Loss of balance and vertigo
Seizures
Loss of consciousness
Sudden memory impairment
Headache
Light-headedness
Dizziness
Confusion and feeling intoxicated
Nausea
Eye irritation
Vomiting
Gastro-intestinal problems (diarrhoea)
Coughs
Breathing difficulties (shortness of breath)
Tightness in chest
Respiratory failure requiring oxygen
Increased heart rate and palpitations
Irritation of eyes, nose and upper airways
Tinnitus
Chemical sensitivities


Sufferers may have had diagnoses of CFS/ME, MCS, mysterious viral infection, depression, sleep disorders, stress, anxiety, "it's in your head", "stop complaining", etc.

Airliner cabin air comes from the engines and can get contaminated with engine oil, which contains a cocktail of toxins. If an engine oil seal is faulty it may let a certain amount of oil into the air supply, ranging from imperceptible to an odd smell to thick smoke in the cabin.

These symptoms are similar to Gulf War Syndrome or poisoning by other toxins such as pesticides.

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4 Replies:

  • Do you mean that these symptoms can appear after only one flight?
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 11:05 PM
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  • Felsen. Yes, symptoms can appear after one flight if there has been a large oil leak. Or they can start to appear gradually over time if you fly regularly and are often exposed to background levels of toxins. Some aircraft types have a particularly bad reputation in this area. The Aerotoxic Association has more information.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 11:35 PM
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  • Sufferers may have had diagnoses of CFS/ME, MCS, mysterious viral infection, depression, sleep disorders, stress, anxiety, "it's in your head", "stop complaining", etc. Airliner cabin air comes from the engines and can get contaminated with engine oil, which contains a cocktail of toxins. If an engine oil seal is faulty it may let a certain amount of oil into the air supply, ranging from imperceptible to an odd smell to thick smoke in the cabin. These symptoms are similar to Gulf War Syndrome or poisoning by other toxins such as pesticides. Good post. I once went to a lecture by a world famous CFS expert who came to Australia to give a talk on this illness. During that lecture he spoke about how CFS was more common in aircraft pilots (due to the reason you are giving there). This is just ONE way people can end up getting CFS, so that diagnoses of CFS may be correct, (it isnt wrong just cause it was triggered this way).. CFS just has many triggering things and these toxins are just one. Ive actually came across one here.. a pilot who'd come to this site seeking a diagnoses who did have CFS caused by this. (Peoples histories can help one to more accurately make a CFS diagnoses).
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 05:30 AM
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  • taniaaust1, You make a good point that a diagnosis of CFS may be correct in these cases. In the same way, some of the other illnesses I mentioned may be valid as they are in effect a subset of Aerotoxic Syndrome. But as with a lot of illnesses, you can’t start to treat it unless you can establish the root CAUSE. And in the case of AS, the root cause is exposure to nasty toxins including organophosphates. And the treatment is to stop further exposure and to eliminate the toxins from the body A lot of doctors don’t know about AS, as the condition hasn’t yet been officially recognised – this has to do with the fact that this illness would be very inconvenient for the airline industry. p.s. Who is the CFS expert you referred to?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 10:03 PM
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