Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Erythema Multiforme???????

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 12 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • February 23, 2007
  • 08:00 PM

My 3 Year Old Son Was Recently Diagnosed With Erythema Multiforme Minor. I Was Told His Rash Was Caused From An Allergy To Amoxicillin, And The Rash Would Be Clearing Up In A Few Days. He Now Is Developing Minor Swelling On His Body,mostly Hands And Feet, And Often Complains Of His Stomach Hurting, And Awakes In The Night Crying. He Often Gets Very Little Sleep. There Were No Tests Ran On Him To Determine Anything, And His Rash Continues To Spread All Over His Body. They Have Him On A Steroid Drug To Help, And With Only Two Days Left Of The Drug, He Just Gets Worse. He Has Been To The Pediatrician And The Er A Few Times Now, And They Tell Me Its Just An Allergy, I Can't Seem To Find Out Much About His Condition Anywhere, Or Figure Out Why It Just Doesn't Want To Go Away. If Anyone Knows Anything About This, And If All Of This Is Normal, Please Help...

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  • Try looking up Urticaria it's about the same thing don't know much about it but it could be of help.
    CUPCAKE 3 Replies
    • February 23, 2007
    • 08:24 PM
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  • My 3 Year Old Son Was Recently Diagnosed With Erythema Multiforme Minor. I Was Told His Rash Was Caused From An Allergy To Amoxicillin, And The Rash Would Be Clearing Up In A Few Days. He Now Is Developing Minor Swelling On His Body,mostly Hands And Feet, And Often Complains Of His Stomach Hurting, And Awakes In The Night Crying. He Often Gets Very Little Sleep. There Were No Tests Ran On Him To Determine Anything, And His Rash Continues To Spread All Over His Body. They Have Him On A Steroid Drug To Help, And With Only Two Days Left Of The Drug, He Just Gets Worse. He Has Been To The Pediatrician And The Er A Few Times Now, And They Tell Me Its Just An Allergy, I Can't Seem To Find Out Much About His Condition Anywhere, Or Figure Out Why It Just Doesn't Want To Go Away. If Anyone Knows Anything About This, And If All Of This Is Normal, Please Help...The lesser version of Erythema Multiforme (minor), it should clear itself up in 1-6 weeks. That doesn't sound very encouraging, I know. Amoxicillin is one of the common triggers for this, as you have mentioned. if it were the very serious version (major), you would see painful blisters, mostly on the torso, in the mouth and on the genitals. This form is rare, but watch for it.Oral steroids are given for severe cases, and it sounds like you have one. Get to a dermatologist for your next step. Though it may be "just an allergy", that discounts everything you and your son are going through. It's frustrating to be waved off by doctors when your child is suffering. For now, moist compresses to relieve the skin. Oral anti-histamines (with your doctor's permission) or topical ones (even steriod cremes) for itch relief. Goldenseal root powder can be made into a paste and applied topically to help dry out the lesions. Goldenseal and echinacea can be found or made, into a tincture (and taken orally in water or tea) as an antiviral treatment, but you need to ask someone who can instruct you about how to do this and proper dosages. Avoid acidic foods, such as orange juice. They slow down the body's natural healing process. Get him to drink as much water or non-caffeinated herbal tea as he can comfortably manage and avoid processed foods. I cannot figure out the swelling and the stomach aches. This needs to be checked out in detail. Naturopaths are great at treating allergies and reactions. If the stomach upset and swelling are simply linked to this reaction, simple homepathic treatments for those symptoms would be great. BUT you do need to know it's not a symptom of something more. A dermatologist, by the way, will no doubt be familiar with this skin disorder and may help with your son's comfort and possibly bring a quicker end to this awful chapter.I really hope this was a little helpful.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 25, 2007
    • 01:28 AM
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  • Type in Urticaria Multiforme and you will pull up a recently published paper by the Am. Acad. of Pediatrics.Urticaria Multiforme is a relatively new term to describe EXTREME hives. It is different than Erythema Multiforme because the raised areas MOVE. They are not fixed. They are also less likely to have necrotic centers like Erythema Multiforme. Here's the good news: there is more of a treatment for Urticaria. Steroids are NOT indicated except in extreme cases. Using an H1 and H2 antihistamine is the best treatment. For my daughter who was MISDIAGNOSED with Erythema Multiforme, we were told it would take up to 14 days for her to recover and to continue with Benadryl. However, I found this paper and begged the doctor to prescribe Rinitadine (Zantac) which is the H2 antihistamine. We gave it every 12 hours along with the Benadryl ever 4-6 hours. She cleared up within 2 days. Thank God for the Internet!!! By the way, my pediatrician was VERY grateful to have this paper and said she would begin to spread the word to other doctors in the practice. Short story: question everything!!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 27, 2007
    • 04:23 PM
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  • It could be hives. Seems like he needs allergy testing. Have you also eliminated dairy, eggs, wheat? If it's not an allergy and he has infection, have him tested for mrsa:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methicillin-resistant_Staphylococcus_aureus You may need to take him in to the emergency room.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • October 28, 2007
    • 07:59 AM
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  • Im with everyone else on the h2 bandwagon. For years I have gotten head to toe hives for no apparent reason and sometimes they are so bad it looks like the hives have hives and I was prescribed tagamet in prescription doses and it clears up the hives within hours. I would definately ask if thats an option for your son.
    CassAnn 25 Replies
    • October 29, 2007
    • 07:29 PM
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  • i was diagnosed with Erythema Multiforme major a little over a month ago (after being turned away and sent home from the ER not once but twice!!!! then told by dermatoligist i have 1 hour to be in the ER and hooked up to IV steroid!!!!!!!), i was hospitalized for IV steroid, after being released from hospital and put to prednisone pill form and put on a schedule to have reduced amounts every few days, this is my second time now being reduced from 11 down to 2 over a period of time, and everytime i get down to 2 pills a day, the rash starts again. hopefully your child doesnt have to continue to go through with this, hopefully theirs will go away just with time.but im not having much luck with it myself : ( .. and my legs are horribly scarred and pigments are all funny colors, i look like i was a burn victim, i have had multiple people question if i was. and SPECIALIST say, it was caused by... `SOMETHING` .. well my 3 year old niece could of told me that. how many years they go to school to figure that one out. goddddd. best of luck
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • i was diagnosed with Erythema Multiforme major a little over a month ago (after being turned away and sent home from the ER not once but twice!!!! then told by dermatoligist i have 1 hour to be in the ER and hooked up to IV steroid!!!!!!!), i was hospitalized for IV steroid, after being released from hospital and put to prednisone pill form and put on a schedule to have reduced amounts every few days, this is my second time now being reduced from 11 down to 2 over a period of time, and everytime i get down to 2 pills a day, the rash starts again. hopefully your child doesnt have to continue to go through with this, hopefully theirs will go away just with time.but im not having much luck with it myself : ( .. and my legs are horribly scarred and pigments are all funny colors, i look like i was a burn victim, i have had multiple people question if i was. and SPECIALIST say, it was caused by... `SOMETHING` .. well my 3 year old niece could of told me that. how many years they go to school to figure that one out. goddddd. best of luckMy 8 yr old son was just diagnosed with this the 1st of Sept 2010, and it was horrible, as with you he got better until they lowered his steriods to 1 a day and then it started back, his little body is so scarred and it breaks my heart everytime i look at him, he also looks like he has been burnt. They are saying its from a drug reaction of either his growth treatements or his Focalin for (ADHD), but they are saying less likely of the 2 is growth treatments but everything i have read points me to feeling its the growth hormones, they are wanting me to start him back on his growth treatments but i still refuse, i just dont' want to take the chance of this happening to him again and he still isnt' wiened off the steriods yet. and it's been a month since he started them. i wish they could find more info out on this to help other children and other adults from experienceing this type of pain and suffering. My son has always had lots of allergies and suffers from excema if we dont' keep his skin treated well with lotions and only use certain bath soaps and shampoos.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 1, 2010
    • 06:48 PM
    • 0
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  • Type in Urticaria Multiforme and you will pull up a recently published paper by the Am. Acad. of Pediatrics.Urticaria Multiforme is a relatively new term to describe EXTREME hives. It is different than Erythema Multiforme because the raised areas MOVE. They are not fixed. They are also less likely to have necrotic centers like Erythema Multiforme. Here's the good news: there is more of a treatment for Urticaria. Steroids are NOT indicated except in extreme cases. Using an H1 and H2 antihistamine is the best treatment. For my daughter who was MISDIAGNOSED with Erythema Multiforme, we were told it would take up to 14 days for her to recover and to continue with Benadryl. However, I found this paper and begged the doctor to prescribe Rinitadine (Zantac) which is the H2 antihistamine. We gave it every 12 hours along with the Benadryl ever 4-6 hours. She cleared up within 2 days. Thank God for the Internet!!! By the way, my pediatrician was VERY grateful to have this paper and said she would begin to spread the word to other doctors in the practice. Short story: question everything!!Thank you so much for this post!!! I have printed the article out and I am taking it to the doctor with me tomorrow. This fits my 5 year olds symptoms to a T. I feel relieved and am also sending this to the ER doctor who diagnosed him with EM so she has it for reference.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 28, 2011
    • 04:50 AM
    • 0
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  • Summary:To completely prevent recurring Erythema Multiforme, apply a high SPF lip balm (Blistex 5-star protection or similar) anytime you have sun exposure. Apply even if you are only going to be in the sun for 30 seconds. During an EM outbreak, use Petroleum Jelly on blisters and in places susceptible to blistering.My Story:I was first diagnosed with EM-minor in 2004 (age 24). The doctor prescribed Valtrex 500mg/day. His position was that the cold sores were bringing about the EM. That seemed to make sense because I had my first cold sore around that time. But the outbreaks continued with increasing duration, degree, and frequency. I had only blisters on the hands, feet, and elbows in the beginning. But an outbreak in 2008 sent me to the emergency room because a blister was so close to my eye. The doctor suggested that I use petroleum jelly (which is ok to get in your eyes). That brings me to the first real helpful form of EM mitigation – Petroleum Jelly. Using petroleum jelly on the areas of skin that are blistered or that I think may become blistered due to trauma has significantly improved my condition. It doesn’t prevent an episode of EM, but petroleum jelly does seem to make an outbreak more manageable. During an outbreak, I ALWAYS keep a coating of petroleum jelly on my hands and the tender skin near my eyes. Though I continued the 500mg/day of Valtrex, I was not convinced it was helping. The petroleum jelly was good, but it did nothing to prevent an outbreak. I continued to search for a better solution. I realized that an OTC medicine I had taken for years named Prilosec shows EM as a rare side effect. I immediately discontinued it, but continued to suffer EM outbreaks. Though the frequency of EM episodes had consistently increased over time, the frequency really took off after I moved to NYC in 2009. What had begun as a condition that caused 2 or 3 outbreaks per year had become almost every month or 2. Healing lesions from previous outbreaks would still be visible by the onset of the next outbreak. Erythema Multiforme outbreaks went from being an annoyance to something that was ruining my life. I finally went back to the drawing board and thought about the EM-cold sore link. I suffered EM without visible cold sores, but never visible cold sores without EM. Perhaps attacking cold sores more aggressively would help. I remembered reading that EM is more common in the spring, when people are outside in the sun. I searched online and learned that sun exposure on the lips can be a leading cause of cold sores. I remembered that my EM episode frequency increased after relocating to NYC (where I walk in the sun instead of drive). Putting 2 and 2 together, perhaps sun exposure on the lips is somehow triggering EM outbreaks. In spring 2010, I started using SPF 30 lip balm (Blistex or Chap-stick) before going out in the sun, even if I’m only going to be in the sun for 30 seconds. I have only had 2 outbreaks of Erythema Multiforme since that time, both occurred just after unprotected sun exposure. The first was in October 2010. I went for a walk on the beach and forgot to bring lip balm. I told myself that a few minutes of sun exposure shouldn’t hurt. But less than 1 week later I had EM blisters on my hands, feet, elbows, and face. Then in March 2011 I visited a park and forgot to carry the Blistex with me. I thought that any UV exposure would be minimal, since it was like 6pm. But a few days later I suffered another episode of Erythema Multiforme. I am not suggesting that high SPF lip balm will cure your EM, but it has been 100% effective for me (assuming that I actually apply it). I have also obtained a prescription for Denavir online. I considered applying a small amount to my lips weekly for prevention, even though it is not indicated for such. But I haven’t felt the need to test this method because the Bistex has been so helpful. If you have been struggling to come to grips with Erythema Multiforme, please try using a high SPF lip balm several times per day. Give it a shot and see what happens. Good luck in your quest for getting your life back from this horrible condition.-Matt
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Summary:To completely prevent recurring Erythema Multiforme, apply a high SPF lip balm (Blistex 5-star protection or similar) anytime you have sun exposure. Apply even if you are only going to be in the sun for 30 seconds. During an EM outbreak, use Petroleum Jelly on blisters and in places susceptible to blistering.My Story:I was first diagnosed with EM-minor in 2004 (age 24). The doctor prescribed Valtrex 500mg/day. His position was that the cold sores were bringing about the EM. That seemed to make sense because I had my first cold sore around that time. But the outbreaks continued with increasing duration, degree, and frequency. I had only blisters on the hands, feet, and elbows in the beginning. But an outbreak in 2008 sent me to the emergency room because a blister was so close to my eye. The doctor suggested that I use petroleum jelly (which is ok to get in your eyes). That brings me to the first real helpful form of EM mitigation – Petroleum Jelly. Using petroleum jelly on the areas of skin that are blistered or that I think may become blistered due to trauma has significantly improved my condition. It doesn’t prevent an episode of EM, but petroleum jelly does seem to make an outbreak more manageable. During an outbreak, I ALWAYS keep a coating of petroleum jelly on my hands and the tender skin near my eyes. Though I continued the 500mg/day of Valtrex, I was not convinced it was helping. The petroleum jelly was good, but it did nothing to prevent an outbreak. I continued to search for a better solution. I realized that an OTC medicine I had taken for years named Prilosec shows EM as a rare side effect. I immediately discontinued it, but continued to suffer EM outbreaks. Though the frequency of EM episodes had consistently increased over time, the frequency really took off after I moved to NYC in 2009. What had begun as a condition that caused 2 or 3 outbreaks per year had become almost every month or 2. Healing lesions from previous outbreaks would still be visible by the onset of the next outbreak. Erythema Multiforme outbreaks went from being an annoyance to something that was ruining my life. I finally went back to the drawing board and thought about the EM-cold sore link. I suffered EM without visible cold sores, but never visible cold sores without EM. Perhaps attacking cold sores more aggressively would help. I remembered reading that EM is more common in the spring, when people are outside in the sun. I searched online and learned that sun exposure on the lips can be a leading cause of cold sores. I remembered that my EM episode frequency increased after relocating to NYC (where I walk in the sun instead of drive). Putting 2 and 2 together, perhaps sun exposure on the lips is somehow triggering EM outbreaks. In spring 2010, I started using SPF 30 lip balm (Blistex or Chap-stick) before going out in the sun, even if I’m only going to be in the sun for 30 seconds. I have only had 2 outbreaks of Erythema Multiforme since that time, both occurred just after unprotected sun exposure. The first was in October 2010. I went for a walk on the beach and forgot to bring lip balm. I told myself that a few minutes of sun exposure shouldn’t hurt. But less than 1 week later I had EM blisters on my hands, feet, elbows, and face. Then in March 2011 I visited a park and forgot to carry the Blistex with me. I thought that any UV exposure would be minimal, since it was like 6pm. But a few days later I suffered another episode of Erythema Multiforme. I am not suggesting that high SPF lip balm will cure your EM, but it has been 100% effective for me (assuming that I actually apply it). I have also obtained a prescription for Denavir online. I considered applying a small amount to my lips weekly for prevention, even though it is not indicated for such. But I haven’t felt the need to test this method because the Bistex has been so helpful. If you have been struggling to come to grips with Erythema Multiforme, please try using a high SPF lip balm several times per day. Give it a shot and see what happens. Good luck in your quest for getting your life back from this horrible condition.-MattHi MattYou wrote that post about a year ago. I'm curious, how has your experience with EM and lip balm been over the last year?Best,b
    bss1276 2 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Matt,You made that post about a year ago. I'm curious - how has your experience with EM and lip balm been over the last year?Best,b
    bss1276 2 Replies Flag this Response
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  • I recently was diagnosed with Erythema Multiforme after taking Amoxicillin. I was prescribed a two week course of antibiotics for a suspected case of sinus infection. After the 6th day of taking amoxicillin, I broke out in a head-to-toe rash that significantly got worse over the course of 2 days. Here it was: http://imgur.com/a/Nq0HMI was treating the rash at home with benadryl every 4 hours but got no relief. At one point, I went to the ER where they gave me epinephrine, and IV course of steroids (solu-medrol), benadryl, and pepcid. Unfortunately, none of the medications offered any even minor relief. The doctor figured the epinephrine would help bring the rash down but it didn't do anything. I left the ER and was given a 6 day course of prednisone (starting at 65 mg - decreasing by 10 mg each day) and told to continue the benadryl every 4 hours, pepcid, and zyrtec. I also tried hydroxine instead of the benadryl for a few days but got no relief from that too. It took about 6 days for the rash to completely clear. However, one week after the rash cleared, it returned! Not quite as bad in the photos but still a pretty severe head-to-toe rash and this time it was itchy. I returned to my doctor and a dermatologist was consulted. He said the rash returned (rebound reaction) because they had prescribed prednisone which, according to him does not help this type of rash it only prolongs the reaction. After another 5 days the "rebound" reaction cleared.I really didn't find any relief from any of the above remedies... it seemed like my case just needed to run its course.
    michellero 2 Replies
    • November 17, 2012
    • 05:59 PM
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