Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Daughter & husband having....seizures??? maybe

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 5 Replies
  • Posted By: FixMEdoc
  • September 21, 2007
  • 04:50 AM

First, they are not related biologically~ With my daughter, she started from about birth where she'd just suddenly "freeze" & her eyes would cut hard to one side for several seconds, then she'd relax, and go on as if nothing had happened. She is now 10 & can explain to me what is going on when this happens(it still does)- she says she can feel it coming on- and feels like she can hold back from doing it(sounds sort of like Tourhette's maybe?), but ultimately must have this "spell" where she feels overwhelming rage- sometimes even digs her nails into her own arms. This is very different from her avg. personality & is very frustrating for her. I've asked 3 pediatricians over the years who have all seemed unconcerned.

Now...the husband- He's started having these "episodes" where he sort of phases out for several seconds, feels very disconnected, and last night when this happened, his eyes fluttered back & forth very rapidly. When the episode stopped(just a few seconds later), he jumped up, gasped and was very caught off gaurd by it. He was asleep within 5-10 min. after.

He also has these episodes where he feels like he can't get air into his lungs, and when he does, it's a loud, single gasp in....then he's fine.

(???) Anyone maybe have some direction for me on either one of them??

Reply Flag this Discussion

5 Replies:

  • Take your daughter to a neurologist. Take your husband to a sleep study specialist. Sounds like he has sleep apnea.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • September 21, 2007
    • 08:13 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Or for your husband, an ENT doc. Some people have enlarged epiglottis' which block breathing in, and would cause oxygen defecit in the brain.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • September 21, 2007
    • 08:15 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I KNOW that he has sleep apnea- I have mild sleep apnea & severe narcolepsy, so I'm familiar w/ sleep disorders. He's not been diagnosed, but he stops breathing repeatedly at night, and I sometimes have to make him wake up & readjust his pillows so that he will do it less frequently. BUT....these things happen to him while he's very awake. Any ideas about what might be wrong w/ my daughter?
    FixMEdoc 53 Replies
    • September 21, 2007
    • 04:22 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Not getting enough "quality" sleep at night can make you act very bizarre the next day. If he has sleep apnea, he needs a positive breathing mask. His brain cells are being robbed of oxygen and he needs to start pronto. Re your daughter. Go see a psychiatrist . "Rage attacks" is not a recognized diagnostic disorder or term, and yet anyone who's parenting a child with them or working clinically with a child or teen with such outbursts can probably immediately relate to the phrase. As I use the term, a "rage attack" is a sudden, out-of-control explosive outburst that appears -- to the observer and the individual experiencing it -- to be without warning and totally out of proportion to any triggering event in the environment. It is also experienced as being a somewhat (but not completely) uncontrollable event that once it's started, just has to run its course. A "rage attack" is not a "tantrum," because tantrum behaviors are goal-directed. The purpose of a tantrum is to get someone who is not doing what you want them to do what you want. If there is no one around, a tantrummer generally stops tantrumming because their tantrum isn't working. Some people describe "rage attacks" as "storms" that come without warning. Others describe them as a "meltdown."HOW ARE THEY DIAGNOSED?Because there is no formal diagnosis called "Rage Attacks," there are no agreed-upon diagnostic criteria. But there are a number of terms in the professional literature that seem related, if not identical to, "rage attacks." The closest diagnoses would appear to be "Intermittent Explosive Disorder" (IED) or "Oppositional Defiant Disorder" (ODD). Other terms used in the literature include "anger attacks," "explosive outbursts," and "episodic dyscontrol."While the label "Intermittent Explosive Disorder" may seem to "fit," the diagnostic criteria do not really match what many patients or parents report, so let's consider how mental health professionals diagnose IED1: Criterion A. Several discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in serious assaultive acts or destruction of property. While there are some children and adults with "rage attacks" who do hit or kick others, the common experience is that these attacks are unlikely to lead to serious assault on individuals or serious destruction of property, although there have been reports that children's "rage attacks" are more likely to be directed against their mothers. Criterion B. The degree of aggressiveness expressed during the episodes is grossly out of proportion to any precipitating psychosocial stressors.Criterion B seems to "fit well" with the reported experience of how seemingly innocuous events can trigger the attack. C. The aggressive episodes are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g., Antisocial Personality Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, a Psychotic Disorder, a Manic Episode, Conduct Disorder, or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) and are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition (e.g., head trauma, Alzheimer's disease). Since many of the individuals who have "rage attacks" do have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and/or a mood disorder etc. I found this under "tourette's rage". Hope this helps.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • September 22, 2007
    • 10:38 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I wasn't aware that the depravation of Oxygen could cause seizure type episodes. I keep "saying" that we've gotta get him on a C-PAP, but ya know, it's been a "some day" thing. I guess maybe we should get on that. My daughter doesn't actually "act out" aggressively. It's completely internal. She never actually destroys property or injures people(except for herself, if she happens to have her arms crossed & digs her nails into her forearms). However, she told me last night that the night prior, she had an episode where she felt it come on & had to punch her pillow for "several minutes"(which may be less than 1 min.- you know how perception of time is when you're tracking it). I've never seen her do anything like that before(or had her tell me that she'd had to "get it out" that way). She does suffer from depression & anxiety. From the age of 2, she would cry in the evenings, saying she just was sad, but didn't know why. That in itself has been difficult for me to make the right call on, concerning what steps to take, until she's old enough to get on meds. I never see her express extreme emotion in the form of rage, only overwhelming sadness & hopelessnes, regardless of the weight of the issue.
    FixMEdoc 53 Replies
    • September 23, 2007
    • 00:08 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.