Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Could this be Cushing's?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 10 Replies
  • Posted By: Bonstr
  • August 27, 2007
  • 05:05 PM

Hi there!
I just learned about Cushing’s and am pretty sure that this is what is going on with me. I have had my blood work done and the NP told me that everything looked fine and to take fiber pills and lose weight. I have gained 42LBS since May and don’t think I just need fiber… Some of the things I noticed on my test once I got a copy is that I had low testosterone levels (44.2 should be 63-120). I figured since she didn’t mention anything about this then she isn’t going to look too hard to find out what the deal is. I have suffered from vertigo for 25 years undiagnosed. I have been having a lot of joint pain, swelling in my face, hands and feet. I have hair growth on my nipples and chin and neck. On disability for depression, a lot of lower back pain for about 4 years. I have the hump on the back of my neck, rounded face, neck pain, heat and light sensitivity, night sweats, leg cramps, GROSS sweating. I can’t help but wonder if this is what I have, but I have been so beat up every year trying to find out what the problem is. I know something is wrong.

At this point I am looking at 3 things. MS, Cushing’s or Pre Menopause. I have a 46 month daughter and I am 43 years old. Does anyone have a clue for me?? J Do you think I am on the right track? I am doing the 24 hour wiz quiz today and I go to an Endocrinologist tomorrow. I will be seeing a Neurologist next week. I keep hearing that this is a very rare disease and to me it doesn’t look that way. Then I think how could I possibly have this if it is so rare. Help!

Happy Thoughts and Warm Hugs!
Bonnie

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10 Replies:

  • Polycystic ovarian syndrome? (PCOS)Turner Syndrome
    aquila 1263 Replies
    • August 27, 2007
    • 06:19 PM
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  • Polycystic ovarian syndrome? (PCOS)Turner SyndromeThe doctor sugested PCOS but when the blood came back she didn't think that was it. Thanks I will look up Turner Syndrome
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 27, 2007
    • 06:52 PM
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  • It's pretty sad when we have to become our own "investigators, researchers and doctors", don't you think?. I was in the same boat!!!!! I would look into chronic fatigue syndrome even if fatigue is not your main symptom it does not mean you don't have this. weight changesvertigojoint painhair growthdepressionback/neck painheat/light sensitivitynightsweatsleg crampsall of these are symptoms Fibromyalgia would explain the swelling as it is "rheumatoid" in nature. I suffer from both so I knew your symptoms right away. I have suffered for a long time.The only help I found was here in this forumSomeone recommended NAET/Bioset therapy. I was skeptical but I went. After just 6 treatments my sx are 90% resolved and I am going back to work for the first time in over a year. Hope this info helps.check out www.naet.com www.bioset.net for practicioners in your area. Best regards, mommy cat:)
    mommy cat 1654 Replies
    • August 27, 2007
    • 10:36 PM
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  • Here is the group of CFS symptoms...yours are highlighted in red Sore throat, chills, sweats,(includes night sweats) low body temperature, low grade fever, lymphadenopathy, muscle weakness (or paralysis), muscle pain, muscle twitches or spasms, gelling of the joints, hypoglycaemia, hair loss, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, chest pain, cardiac arrhythmia, resting tachycardia, orthostatic tachycardia, orthostatic fainting or faintness, circulatory problems, opthalmoplegia, eye pain, photophobia, blurred vision, wavy visual field, and other visual and neurological disturbances, hyperacuity, tinnitus, alcohol intolerance, gastrointestinal and digestive disturbances, allergies and sensitivities to many previously well-tolerated foods, drug sensitivities, stroke-like episodes, nystagmus, difficulty swallowing, weight changes, paresthesias, polyneuropathy, proprioception difficulties, myoclonus, temporal lobe and other types of seizures, an inability to maintain consciousness for more than short periods at a time, confusion, disorientation, spatial disorientation, disequilibrium, breathing difficulties, emotional lability, sleep disorders; sleep paralysis, fragmented sleep, difficulty initiating sleep, lack of deep-stage sleep and/or a disrupted circadian rhythm. Neurocognitive dysfunction may include cognitive, motor and perceptual disturbances. Cognitive dysfunction may be pronounced and may include; difficulty or an inability to speak (or understand speech), difficulty or an inability to read or write or to do basic mathematics, difficulty with simultaneous processing, poor concentration, difficulty with sequencing and problems with memory including; difficulty making new memories, difficulty recalling formed memories and difficulties with visual and verbal recall (eg. facial agnosia). And for Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia is very closely related to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), the main difference being that with CFS, the predominant symptom is fatigue; with fibromyalgia, it is pain. Fibromyalgia is a rheumatic disorder that most commonly affects the neck, lower back, shoulders, back of the head, upper thighs, elbows, buttocks, knees and the upper chest. It is important to remember, however, that the achy, burning pains of the disease can strike any part of the body. The pain and stiffness is typically worse in the morning and is often accompanied by insomnia, headaches, depression, brain fog, incoordination, digestive disorders, dizziness, panic attacks and skin rashes. The immune system of an affected person is often hypersensitive and allergies to environmental and dietary factors are common. Symptoms can be aggravated by allergies, overexertion, lack of sleep and acute infections. Hope this helps...mommy cat
    mommy cat 1654 Replies
    • August 27, 2007
    • 10:50 PM
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  • many women with these dis-eases also suffer polycystic ovarian disease. I know, I am one of them. I was diagnosed at age 13 with the onset of my first cycle. That explains the hair growth...I have some of that as well. If you would like to e-mail me, let me know, I will post my address. Be well and stay strong. Find NAET/Bioset locally and go. It is "alternative" but it works!! Best,mommy cat:)
    mommy cat 1654 Replies
    • August 27, 2007
    • 11:21 PM
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  • I'm no doctor but It sounds like Cushings to me. Here are the symptoms:Moon face (round, red, and full) Buffalo hump (a collection of fat between the shoulders or on the neck) Central obesity with protruding abdomen and thin extremities Weight gain (unintentional) Weakness Backache Headache Acne or superficial skin infections Thin skin with easy bruising Purple striations on the skin of the abdomen, thighs, and breasts Mental changes Impotence or cessation of menses Facial hair growth Skin spots, red Skin blushing/flushing Muscle atrophy Fatigue Bone pain or tenderness High blood pressure I would strongly encourage you to have your serum cortisol levels tested. If you have Cushings they will be high. The test is done in the early morning when cortisol levels are the highest. Your glucose levels may elevated and your potassium may be low as well if you have Cushings.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 31, 2007
    • 04:42 AM
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  • It does sound very cushings to me, but the only way to determine for sure is a brain MRI. What were your cortisol blood levels? This is the key as cushings is due to high cortisol, the elevated cortisol acts just like if you were taking a high dose steroid pill, you get the same symptoms buffalo hump, moon face, weight gain in the middle yet skinny arms and legs, acne, hair loss etc. I think the cortisol is key, what were the measurments in your blood or urine? I am sure a doc would have checked this for you.
    burninghead 37 Replies
    • September 5, 2007
    • 03:26 PM
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  • It could be Cushing's but hypothyroid has almost the same symptoms as Cushing's, but thyroid is a lot more common so I would probably check into getting your thyroid checked out also. One problem I have right now is that my TSH is just a little over 4 and the doctor is apparently waiting until I am at 5.5 which is the level the lab considers one hypothyroid, although I have all the symptoms of hypothyroid. I keep going up 1 higher number each year so I probably have to wait another year or so until I reach their lab's definition of hypothyroid...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 8, 2007
    • 06:31 AM
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  • Sounds just like PCOS. They tested me for cushing's, and when the results came back they told me I had PCOS.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 8, 2007
    • 11:18 PM
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  • I think they have changed the thyroid numbers to a tsh of over 3 being more hypo, I think they keep lowering the tsh standards, you sound hypo dont you think?
    burninghead 37 Replies
    • September 9, 2007
    • 01:12 AM
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