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Could gallstones lead to a possible come back of salmonella infection?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 3 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • September 9, 2008
  • 06:42 AM

Should gallbladder be removed to treat gallstones and to prevent a come back of salmonella infection?

What are the medical conditions or diseases that could increase the risk of developing a come back of salmonella infection?

What is the risk of developing complications from a come back of salmonella infection
:confused:

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  • Your gallbladder would have nothing to do with reacurring salmonellaAnd yes if gallstones are bad enough and the gall bladder is enlarged as evident through a ultrasound then yes it should be removed. Salmonella is a sickness aquired from under cooked food,or improperly handled food,or the failure to properly clean food utensils. Gallstones are hard, pebble-like deposits that form inside the gallbladder. Gallstones may be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball, depending on how long they have been forming. Alternative Names Cholelithiasis Causes, incidence, and risk factors The cause of gallstones varies. Some stones form when there is too much cholesterol or bilirubin in the bile. (Bile is a liquid that helps the body digest fats.) Other stones form if there are not enough bile salts or if the gallbladder fails to empty properly.One type of gallstones, called pigment stones, tend to occur in people who have medical conditions that cause the liver to make too much bilirubin. Pigment stones are also more common in persons with liver cirrhosis and biliary tract infections.Gallstones are a common health problem worldwide. They are more common in women, Native Americans, and people over the age of 40.Other risk factors include ethnic and genetic factors, obesity, diabetes, cirrhosis, receiving nutrition through a vein for a long period of time (intravenous feedings), and certain operations for peptic ulcers. Symptoms There are usually no symptoms. Gallstones are usually discovered when having a routine x-ray, abdominal surgery, or other medical procedure.Symptoms usually occur if a large stone blocks the cystic duct or the common bile duct. The cystic duct drains fluid from the the gallbladder into the the common bile duct, which is the main duct draining into the duodenum. Together, these ducts form part of the biliary system.A stone blocking the opening from the gallbladder or cystic duct usually produces a cramping pain in the middle to right upper abdomen. This is known as biliary colic. The pain goes away if the stone passes into the first part of the small intestine (the duodenum). Acute cholecystitis occurs if the stone does not pass into the duodenum.If the common bile duct is blocked for a long period of time, pancreatitis or cholangitis may result.Symptoms that may occur include:Abdominal pain in the right upper or middle upper abdomen:May be recurrentMay be sharp, cramping, or dullMay spread to the back or below the right shoulder bladeMay be made worse by fatty or greasy foodsOccurs within minutes of a mealFeverYellowing of skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice)Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease include:Abdominal fullnessClay-colored stoolsExcess gasHeartburnIndigestionNausea and vomitingIt is important to see a doctor if you have symptoms of gallstones. Gallstones are found in many people with gallbladder cancer.
    simidrm 36 Replies
    • September 9, 2008
    • 11:55 AM
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  • Thank you for your reply to my query.:) When one recovered from Salmonella infection, what is the likely hood of a recurrence when there are traces of gallstone in his gall bladder?:confused: Would it be advisable for one who is a diabetic and has cholesterol to remove the gall bladder just to reduce the risk of gallstone and salmonella will come back? :confused:
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 10, 2008
    • 01:13 AM
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  • Thank you simidrm for your reply to my query.:) When one recovered from Salmonella infection, what is the likely hood of a recurrence when there are traces of gallstone in his gall bladder?:confused: The traces of gallstone was discovered (ultrasound) during the treatment of Salmonella infection at a hospital. Fortunately, he has yet to encounter the symptoms of gallstones that were being mentioned. The gallstones could be in its early stage. Should the gallstones be removed at this stage to prevent it from developing to the size of a golf ball ? Would it be advisable for one who is a diabetic and has cholesterol to remove the gall bladder just to reduce the risk of gallstone and salmonella will come back? :confused:
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 10, 2008
    • 01:50 AM
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