Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

Can't drink anything cold!!!

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 7 Replies
  • Posted By: Christopherr
  • October 27, 2007
  • 08:42 AM

Hi everyone,

I'd be really grateful for any tips that could help me overcome my longlasting problem.

I can't drink anything cold as immediately afterwards it results in a laryngitis. I have had problems with my throat since childhood. I could never drink cold drinks as they usually made me ill, I had a terrible sore throat, temperature and I had to take antibiotics. What was interesting was that I could eat ice cream and in most cases nothing wrong happened.

In my late teens I discovered I could drink even a few pints of really cold beer and I didn't have any throat problems. This was the only thing I could drink without suffering from throat problems. Unfortunately, three years ago (I'm 23 now), I realised I can't even drink beer as it also started causing problems. I started to suffer from laryngitis, something that had not happened to me before.

I have visited a few laryngologists, most of whom are high-class specialists. They've no idea what can cause my problem. They say that it may be partially caused by a cist in my sinus, which is visible on my computer tomography. To some extent they may be right, but I had tomography of sinus done when I was twelve, there was no cist there but I had already suffered from throat problems then.

Having to avoid cold drinks can be extremely annoying. It affects my social life, I can't go to any parties, especially discos as all that is served there is ice cold and I don't want to suffer from laryngitis again.

If anybody knows any possible solution to my problem, please let me know. I'll appreciate all suggestions.

Christopherr

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7 Replies:

  • Yes, it is possible to be allergic to the cold. In some people, cold temperatures trigger the release into the skin of histamines and other chemicals made by the immune system. The cause isn't clear. But some people appear to have overly sensitive histamine-containing skin cells.Signs and symptoms of a "cold allergy" — also called cold urticaria — include:Skin redness Itching Hives (urticaria) Swelling As much as possible, people with this condition should avoid exposure to cold air as well as cold water. For example, swimming in a cold lake could cause swelling over your whole body. If you think you have cold urticaria, consult your doctor. Treatment may include over-the-counter or prescription antihistamines taken before exposure to cold temperatures.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 28, 2007
    • 09:26 AM
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  • Yes, allergy to cold - please find a NAET practitioner to clear you of this problem. NAET is Nambudripad Allergy Elimination Techniques. It helps to reverse an allergy, whether to food, clothing, environmental, or emotional. Visit www.naet.com. It works! Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • October 29, 2007
    • 03:51 AM
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  • Thank you so much! I will try this treatment, I hope it helps. However, one of the laryngologists has already told me it could be an allergy. He prescribed me Aerius but it didn't help .:mad:
    Christopherr 4 Replies
    • October 29, 2007
    • 09:35 PM
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  • Thank you so much! I will try this treatment, I hope it helps. However, one of the laryngologists has already told me it could be an allergy. He prescribed me Aerius but it didn't help .:mad: I cannot imagine any Western drug helping you with this problem. NAET is noninvasive, drug free, and extremely helpful. good luck with you and I hope you get relief! Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • October 30, 2007
    • 00:48 AM
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  • Lynnred6 and Acuann, Thank you both for your advice. Acuann, thank you for your suggestions to contact NAET practioner, but it seems to be rather difficult in my case. I live in Europe and here there is a very limited number of places where you could seek their help. Lynnred6, you mentioned urticaria as a syndrome that often goes together with allergy to cold. Indeed, I also suffer from urticaria. Nevertheless, I doubt it has that much to do with intolerance to cold and laryngitis. You see, the first time I suffered from urticaria was half year ago while my problems with laryngitis started five years ago...Also, exposure to cold air hardly ever causes problems in my case. I usually feel very well during winter time, I enjoy doing winter sports like snowboarding. On the other hand, I've to admit that everything is fine during winter time only as long as I wear warm clothes and a wooly hat. Otherwise, I immediately become ill but I've no idea whether it can be classified as allergy to cold air. Coming back to urticaria, it doesn't seem to be serious in my case. Some itchy skin eruptions appear quite often, sometimes even day by day, especially in the area of my stomach, but I try to avoid taking drugs as these eruptions are in most cases little and disappear approx. after an hour. If you have any other suggestions, please don't hesitate and share them with me. Maybe something will finally turn out to be really helpful. Christopherr
    Christopherr 4 Replies
    • November 2, 2007
    • 06:01 PM
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  • I think you have laryngeal dystonia or something related to that. Try emailing one of these people who wrote the articles below. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University Medical Center, 88 East Newton Street, D-608, Boston, MA 02118, USA. gregory.grillone@bmc.orgor: Watts C, Nye C, Whurr R. Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22840, USA. wattscr@jmu.eduPerhaps they can help or suggest someone near you. Botox injections are sometimes used for spasm of the larynx. Your town librarian can get these articles for you or your local hospital might have access through the physicians library. 1: Clin Rehabil. 2006 Feb;20(2):112-22.Botulinum toxin for treating spasmodic dysphonia (laryngeal dystonia): asystematic Cochrane review.Watts C, Nye C, Whurr R.Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, James Madison University,Harrisonburg, VA 22840, USA. wattscr@jmu.eduBACKGROUND: Spasmodic dysphonia is a neurological voice disorder characterized byinvoluntary adductor (towards midline) or abductor (away from midline) vocal foldspasms during phonation which result in phonatory breaks. Botulinum toxin iscurrently the gold standard of treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy ofbotulinum toxin therapy for the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. DESIGN:Systematic Cochrane review. SEARCH STRATEGY: The search strategy for this review complied with Cochrane standards. We searched the Cochrane Central Register ofControlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1966 to February 2005), EMBASE (1974 toFebruary 2005), CINAHL (through February 2005), Dissertation AbstractsInternational (1975 to February 2005) and PsycINFO (1975 to February 2005). Thesearch engine FirstSearch was also used (February 2005). Reference lists for all the obtained studies and other review articles were examined for additionalstudies. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomized control trials where the participantswere randomly allocated prior to intervention and in which botulinum toxin wascompared to an alternative treatment, placebo or non-treated control group wereincluded. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers independently evaluated allpotential studies meeting the selection criteria noted above for inclusion. MAIN RESULTS: Only one study in the literature met the inclusion criteria. This wasthe only study identified which reported a treatment/no treatment comparison. It reported significant beneficial effects for fundamental frequency (Fo), Fo range,spectrographic analysis, independent ratings of voice severity and patientratings of voice improvement. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: The evidence fromrandomized controlled trials supporting the effectiveness of botulinum toxin for management of spasmodic dysphonia is deficient. The lack of supporting evidencefrom randomized controlled trials results in an inability to draw unbiasedgeneralized conclusions regarding the effectiveness of botulinum toxin for alltypes of spasmodic dysphonia.Publication Types: ReviewPMID: 16541931 2: Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 2006 Feb;39(1):87-100.Laryngeal dystonia.Grillone GA, Chan T.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University MedicalCenter, 88 East Newton Street, D-608, Boston, MA 02118, USA.gregory.grillone@bmc.orgPublication Types: ReviewPMID: 16469657 3: J Psychopharmacol. 2005 May;19(3):307-11.Antipsychotic drug-induced acute laryngeal dystonia: two case reports and a mini review.Christodoulou C, Kalaitzi C.Athens' General Hospital G. Gennimatas, Psychiatric Department, Greece.Antipsychotic-induced laryngeal dystonia is a life-threatening side-effect ofboth high- and low-potency classical antipsychotics, and its diagnosis oftenremains elusive. We review all cases of acute laryngeal dystonia due toantipsychotics available in the literature, including controversial ones, and addtwo new cases. There are no reports of acute laryngeal dystonia due to atypicalantipsychotics. Antipsychotic-induced laryngeal dystonia has been reportedpredominantly in young males, but does not correlate to the dosage or thecategory of the drug. There have been reports of acute laryngeal dystonia due to metoclopramide. Differential diagnosis includes other extrapyramidal side-effectsand allergic reactions. Treatment consists of the administration ofanticholinergic agents.Publication Types: ReviewPMID: 15888517
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 3, 2007
    • 07:56 PM
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  • Hi, Thank you very much for your advice. I've emailed the people you've mentioned but they didn't reply. You said it could be laryngeal dystonia or something related to that. From what you've written it seems that it is a permanent condition. In my case it is different as I have problems with my larynx only when I drink something cold which means that cold substances somehow trigger negative reactions of my larynx. It doesn't happen in any other situations. Looking forward to your further advice, Christopherr
    Christopherr 4 Replies
    • November 9, 2007
    • 10:54 PM
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