Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

"rash" caused by water?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 7 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 7, 2007
  • 09:41 AM

Every time I shower/bathe, when I get out and start to dry myself off, I notice little red splotches on my skin. Most of them appear on my back. They can be a little itchy sometimes and if I scratch them I'll sometimes notice little bumps appearing there as well.

This same sort of thing happens in pools/hot tubs.

I'm not allergic to anything that I know of, so I'm not sure if this is an allergic reaction to something in the water, but I doubt it because I've never had any problems from washing my face with the same water. My sister does have extremely sensitive skin, though. Could this be something related to that?

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7 Replies:

  • you could have a fungus and the water makes it come out...have a dermatologists look at it under a flourescent scope...or, you need a florine filter..
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies
    • August 10, 2007
    • 01:28 AM
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  • For anyone who wants a filter for the shower, I bought one at Home Depot for about $30 and it last 6 months. Made by GE, I think. My hair feels softer already. Maybe your rash is a heat sensitivity. Cool down the shower and see what happens.
    rad-skw 1605 Replies
    • August 10, 2007
    • 09:10 AM
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  • Every time I shower/bathe, when I get out and start to dry myself off, I notice little red splotches on my skin. Most of them appear on my back. They can be a little itchy sometimes and if I scratch them I'll sometimes notice little bumps appearing there as well. This same sort of thing happens in pools/hot tubs. I'm not allergic to anything that I know of, so I'm not sure if this is an allergic reaction to something in the water, but I doubt it because I've never had any problems from washing my face with the same water. My sister does have extremely sensitive skin, though. Could this be something related to that?My 13 year old daughter has the same problem. If you find out what it is please post?!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Its called Millusium ( not sure on spelling ) its a viral infection that u get from the water.. trying to find out how now.. Dr said there is no treatment for it but it is tranfered onto surfaces and bath towls, and will clear it's self but if itchy use calamine lotion.. I just got back from the Dr with my 15month old and that is what she has
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 10, 2011
    • 03:23 AM
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  • Its called Millusium ( not sure on spelling ) its a viral infection that u get from the water.. trying to find out how now.. Dr said there is no treatment for it but it is tranfered onto surfaces and bath towls, and will clear it's self but if itchy use calamine lotion.. I just got back from the Dr with my 15month old and that is what she hasNo it's not an infection or anything - i have the same thing. Its not viral or an infection - had that checked out. apparently it's just sensitivity. I take an antihistamine before going anywhere public like sea/pool and that seems to help. Other than that not found anything but as someone said before do let us know if you find anything better!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 11, 2011
    • 03:12 PM
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  • Hi there, this happen to me also. Had it for years now. I showered without using soaps/shampoo's and it is just the water. Also when I cry, my face has a rash. It is very itchy. I went my local doctors and they prescribed me with 'Loratadine' 10mg tablets. This stop's the itching incredibally and the rash doesn't appear. Hope this has helped :)
    leavoice-x 1 Replies
    • November 13, 2012
    • 02:56 PM
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  • Like you said, it probably isn't an allergic reaction - if it were you would find a more uniform disturbance all over the skin, and it would affect your entire skin rather than a particular body site. Also, viral infections normally don't cause a rash as the primary symtoms so very unlikely that it would be that. As the other first respondant said, its most likely a dermatophytic fugus (a fungus that lives on the skin if people. Tinea is tha name given to various species of fungi which can live on human skin. Many of them have a favoured region and are difficult to identify and/or get rid of. Some prefer the feet, some the scalp, some the armpits and some the back. Ofthen they are invisible, but some appear a shade of white, slightly lighter than typical caucasian skin colour, and many appear red. They also seem to prefer some individuals over others. This is why, even though they are highly contagious, most people who come into contact with the fungus wont develop an infection of it. It is quite common to only be able to see them after a hot shower/bath or excercise. This is because althought the fungi themseves are invisible, because they have penetrated into the epidermis, the skin that they have burrowed into is inflammed. Also, these fungi love heat and water. Together, this engorges them and makes them go bright red. Although they can be very persistant and hard to get rid of, there are simple things you can do to help. They like wetness and heat, so try to keep yourself, and especially the area that is infected, as dry and cool as possible as much of the time as possible. If you do sweat, try to have a shower to wash the sweat off, 2 or 3 times a day if neccessary. As they like heat, and hot water is damaging to the integrity of the skin, try to keep the water temperature cool or lukewarm, rather than as hot as you can handle. Wear clean clothes - dont change into clothes that have been worn all day after your showers. Change bedsheets regularly. Apart from these precautions, there are many topical antifungal preparations (creams, ointments, rubs and sprays) that you can use to try to fight the infection. Ketoconazole, tubinafine and selenium are all antifungal agents you may find in topical antifugal preparations which may hep kill the fungi. Sprays would be good for an area that is hard to reach such as the back as you do not have to reach every centimetre the surface with your hands. These preparations can be expensive so make sure you use the simpler measures in conjuction with a topical antifungal treatment. In adition, the fungi doesn't like many essential oils, such as tea tree, rosemary and eukalyptus oils. Use these instead of, as well as or in between treatments with the topical antifungal treatments. Most pharmacies sell a range of anti-fungal preparations behined the counter. Some infections are very hard to get rid of, even when anti-fungal preparations are used. In this case, you might be able to get a prescription for an oral antifungal agent (tablet) and/or steroidal drugs which can stimulate your immune system to fight off the fungi. If you are given an antifungal tablet to take, remember, the fungus is attracted to your skin because of its conditions (moisture, heat), and the spores (eggs) of these fungi are ubiquitous (everyhere). You will most likely get another infection of the same fungi in the same place as soon as you stop taking the antifungal pills, unless you keep up with maintaining an inhospitable environment for the fungus. For many people, skin care is constant, and often downward, battle against dermatophytes.
    Dr Mike 1 Replies
    • October 3, 2013
    • 05:36 AM
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