Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

5 year old- leg pain temporary loss of vision

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 4 Replies
  • Posted By: flores
  • November 6, 2006
  • 07:21 PM

My 5 year old nephew has a very high threshold for pain. He has had severe strep throat which developed into scarlet fever, because he never complained or displayed symprtoms until it was very far along. He also has had severe ear infections caught very late, because he never complains of pain, and is never lethargic and doesn't slow down even with a fever.
This morning he awoke crying with leg pain. His mother thought it may be growing pains and gave him motrin and proceeded to get him ready for school. While brushing his teeth, his legs collapsed from under him and he fell to the floor. His head did not hit the floor. He sat up and began to grab at the air around him screaming that he could not see anything. My sister was there and said that each of his eyes was looking in a different direction and almost rolled back, like a blind person's eyes. So he was conscious, but could not see. She carried him to the bedroom and once on the bed his vision returned and he said his legs no longer hurt. She asked him if he had seen blurriness or fuzziness or just black. He said everything went black and he couldn't see. He was fine after, but a little quiet and more still than usual. Usually he's running around and singing or talking constantly. She took him to the doctor. By this time he was running around and his usual rambunctious self, even though he did have a fever. The doctor said that he was probably just dizzy or groggy, from the fever and having just waken up and that no diagnosis could be made until the doctor could see it happening. His mother is certain that it must be something more serious. Has anyone ever experienced this? I told her to go to the emergency room and get a second and third opinion if she had to. Any advice or information would be helpful and appreciated.
Thank you

Reply Flag this Discussion

4 Replies:

  • I know it's been a while since the original note was posted, but I wanted to reply anyway. Hopefully, Flores, you guys were able to find out what was going on with him. The same thing happened to my 17-year-old son. He was awakened with the worst pain he'd ever felt in his leg. He said his leg was real tight, tighter than he could make it if he tried, and it hurt like nothing had before. At the same time, he was completely blind. He couldn't see a thing. He's not sure how long it lasted, but all of the sudden the pain stopped, and at the same time he could see again. No residual. I asked him why he didn't call out to his brother or something, and he said he's not even sure he could have if he wanted to. He doesn't know if his speech was affected or not, but it is odd he didn't call out or at least yell out a few colorful words. I can't find a thing on line about this, other than conversion syndrome, which seems unlikely for both our boys. Stroke or some other brain event also seems unlikely, with one leg affected along with speech problems, and a problem with the back, say sciatic nerve impingement, wouldn't affect speech. Any clues on your end?
    MayraMM 1 Replies
    • September 12, 2007
    • 01:36 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • No! And it's never happened again. No doctor (pedi, neurologist, gen md) could explain what happened, so we're just suppposed to keep an eye on him and wait to see if it happens again.Rina
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 12, 2007
    • 01:45 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Scarlet fever used to cause blindness before modern treatment. If it went untreated a long time, I think you will want to see a specialist in case he still has scarlet fever or is having side effects.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 12, 2007
    • 11:01 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • In my son all of it was completely transient. I'd think if it were scarlet fever (which he did have when he was a kid), it wouldn't have been transient.One thought I had was atypical migraine. I have totally painless migraines. All I get is the aura, which lasts for about 45 minutes, then it goes away. I've also hear of people having abdominal migraines. Maybe this was some kind of migraine that caused the temporary blindness and made the brain think the leg was in pain. A friend of mine had horrible abdominal pain, only to find out it was caused by calcium deposits in the veins of his brain stem. I'll definitely keep an eye on my son, and if it happens again, I'll either take him in immediately or call an ambulance, just so his symptoms can be documented by someone other than himself or his mother.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 13, 2007
    • 01:16 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
Thanks! A moderator will review your post and it will be live within the next 24 hours.