Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

4 Doctors and No answer

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 1 Replies
  • Posted By: NotSoLeet
  • August 12, 2010
  • 10:18 AM

Thank you ahead of time for reading this.

10 months ago at work, I felt dehydrated and lightheaded like I was going to pass out. My blood pressure was very high, my vision was blurry and I got fatigued easily. The symptoms continued on for a couple of weeks and then I got better.

In November the symptoms came back and have not let up since. The continuing symptoms are fatigue in the legs, tingling in the arms (not like they're falling asleep but more like an aching at a certain point in my forearms), lightheaded, and the most noticeable is a heart that beats very hard and / or fast. I've seen 4 doctors and nobody is helping figure out what is wrong.

I've been on beta blockers, calcium beta blockers (im off all bp meds for a few months now and my bp is 105 / 70), Adavan (which doesn't really help), and Celexa (one doctor thought I had a mild case of anxiety but the pills made me all weird, tired, and my teeth wouldn't stop chattering).

I've had a chest X-ray, an ultrasound, and a ton of blood work. Thyroid problems run on my mom's side of the family but everything is checking out "normal."

Only thing on the labs that look odd are high fasting insulin (but no sign of diabetes, hgba1c is at 5%) high cortisol and a vitamin d deficiency (which I have been supplementing for the past 3 weeks).

Below, I have compiled a complete PDF of my labs. I'm not sure why the file size is 20+ megs but I will try and get it smaller eventually. I hosted it on rapid share. Just click the "free user" button and wait a few seconds.

Thank you again, any help would mean to world to me as this illness is ruining all of my relationships.


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  • I feel your pain, had very similar SUDDEN onset symptoms. I was put on aldactone, which is a diuretic and a very strong beta blocker. My BP and Pulse were high, which was unusual for me. I had every blood test run under the sun. I wasnt getting any better. finally took all of my labwork to my doctor of internal medicine at UAB Health center here in Bham. He reviewed the labwork, did extra muscle testing including reflexes, took my blood pressure lying down, after standing up for two minutes, and sitting to make sure there was no "positional" variance. Here is what he did and although it didn't FIX it overnight, I am improving. He took me off the BP because he was concerned it was contributing to dips and lows in my BP. He had my BP numbers for 6 years prior, so he knew I wasnt truly hypertensive. He lowered my aldactone to 50 MG a day. He has me on a sodium restricted diet. I also went on "compounded" T3 for my thyroid, even though my thyroid bloodwork is in the normal range. In my family all my aunts and mothers had one form of thyroid disease to the other, from Hypothyroid to Graves Disease. I don't know where you live, it may be difficult to find a doctor that does that type of therapy. You can look for a D.O. that will consider natural treatments or look up the Medhaus pharmacy and get suggestions from them.I am so sorry, I know how scary it is and I hope you find relief. Although it can't be proven, my doctors theory as to what brought on the sudden onset of symptoms was an ovarian cyst.. and the medication that was prescribed to "fix" the problem muddied the waters for his diagnoses. The aldactone I take besides being a diuretic also helps with ovarian cysts. I don't know if you have ever been tested for polycystic ovaries, but generally insulin resistance/blood sugar issues can go with that as well, and they sometimes prescribe diabetic medication in the treatment.
    Anonymous 42,789 Replies
    • August 18, 2010
    • 10:45 PM
    • 0
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