Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

37 male with constant dry cough

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 10 Replies
  • Posted By: craigjen
  • November 10, 2008
  • 08:30 PM

I have been coughing now for about 3 to 4 months. Symptoms are as follows. In the morning and evening the cough is worse it seems, but I cough all day long. Morning times I may cough up mucus and that's about the only time for this. When breathing out the cough seems to be activated. Not much tickling in the throat. No shortness of breath. No fever.
Any help would be highly appreciated.

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10 Replies:

  • Have you seen a doctor? If not, you might want to have your PCP xray your lungs. If you have visited your PCP and have come up with nothing, I suggest you visit a pulmonologist and/or an ENT. There is a lot of conditions that can cause a dry cough, some of them very serious. Don't wait.
    halal37 96 Replies
    • November 10, 2008
    • 09:56 PM
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  • If there are no other symptoms the coughing may be Chronic Bronchitis,if you also have lost weight then it might be something serious,anyway you should be seen by a specialist
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 11:46 AM
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  • what is a pulmonologist? And I plan on getting it looked at but what is it you think it might be if worst case comes? I use to smoke and use chewing tobacco and still dip if that helps.
    craigjen 3 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 06:12 PM
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  • pulmonologist = lung doctor I have no idea what your problem is, but since you did smoke once, you need to get to a pulmonologist right away. There are many possibilities that could be causing your cough. A pulmonologist is the first place to start. Also, could you be having allergies? Any changes in your life since this started? If a trip to a pulmonologist turns up nothing. Then head to the ENT. If an ENT doesn't find anything wrong. Then you might want to visit an allergist. But get a referral to a pulmonologist ASAP.
    halal37 96 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 06:18 PM
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  • Ok thank you. I haven't any allergies or change in life so I really do not think allergies are the cause. I will see a doctor and see what he has to say and try to get a referral. I'm getting a little worried I guess due to getting older.
    craigjen 3 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 06:44 PM
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  • Started Lisinopril in August and it has controlled my BP really well. But I started to get some side effects. After about a month I noticed I was losing my hair. Called the doctor and he said he never heard of it. Then in October 2008 I felt a heavy, pressure feeling in my upper chest, going towards my throat, like something was stuck at the base of my neck. Also a dry cough throughout the day. Went to doc today and he said dry cough is very common with Lisinopril but he doesn't think the chest heaviness/pressure is related. I do. I had a chest X-ray today and am waiting for the results. Am scheduled to have an echo and possibly stress test if the feeling is still there. I'm thinking, after reading all these postings, that Lisinopril is definitely responsible for the hair loss, chest heaviness/pressure feeling, lump feeling in throat and dry cough. I'm tired of feeling these symptoms. Hopefully all my tests will come out fine and I will probably end up changing to a different drug.
    peterworn 8 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 07:32 PM
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  • Well I'm not taking Lisinopril or any type drug at the time so I can't really blame that as the problem. I also feel a little tightness in my throat area around the breast plate and if I leave my head in certain positions I feel more tightness. I hope you figure it out and get past this and thanks for your response.
    craigjen 3 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 07:47 PM
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  • You must see a doctor, but I wanted to mention something that doctors sometimes might forget. It's called the sino-bronchial syndrome. This syndrome means that if you have a bacterial infection in your maxillary sinus (can be ever so small and "quiet"), the bacteria spread down to your lungs and give symptoms there. Even if they would treat your cough, it won't help, until the cause is treated. This is what happened to me. For six months I had a horribble cough and no treatment helped. Finally a wise ENT doctor explained to me what the cause could be. I had my sinuses rinsed and only a small pus clot came out. The next day the cough was gone. Hope you'll find a good doctor and get better. Best of luck!
    Felsen 510 Replies
    • November 11, 2008
    • 10:17 PM
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  • Do you still have your tonsils? If they've been removed, disregard this post.Take a flashlight and look at the back of your throat. If everything appears normal, take a Q-tip and lightly press around the tonsils. If any whitish/yellowish/greenish lumps appear (or were already visible), you most likely have tonsil stones WHICH ARE NOT IN ANY WAY MEDICALLY SERIOUS. However, they do tend to cause a tickling sensation leading to a dry cough. I repeat, although really annoying, they aren't by any means a precancerous symptom or anything like that, just a slightly abnormal way of dealing with food/saliva/bacteria/mucus in the throat.
    lstevens 9 Replies
    • November 12, 2008
    • 00:45 AM
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  • My goodness, the folks on this forum are going right for the big guns. The most common cause of a dry cough is simple post nasal drip! That's when mucus flows from your sinuses into your throat in an irritating way. Causes include allergies and sinus infection. Both of these things are best diagnosed through your local family doc. Allergies can start at any time in life. I never had them until I was 28 years old. Now I get sick every spring, like clock work. They are very easy to treat though, now that I know what I'm dealing with. Sinus infections can be treated with anti-biotics and prevented through the use of a handy dandy contraption called a neti pot, which you can look up if you want to learn more. Your local doctor might want to do some additional blood tests, to make sure you don't have anything more scary, like TB. But really, its unlikely. I suppose another likely candidate is asthma. Sometimes that would make you cough instead of being short of breath. But again, the doctor has a really simple test to rule that out. It involves breathing into a thingy that looks like a toilet paper roll with numbers on the side. Not really something that requires a pulmonary specialist.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 12, 2008
    • 01:48 AM
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