Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

20 year old female, headbanging before sleep, possible brain damage?

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 6 Replies
  • Posted By: collegestudent20
  • November 13, 2010
  • 03:52 AM

Hello all,

I hope to finally get some answers after years of looking for relief.

I am a 20 year old female college student majoring in Biology and Philosophy.

Since I was young (4-5 yrs old) I have been head-banging before going to bed every single night. I find that it relaxes me and allows me to fall asleep better.

As I got older, I would (and still) head-bang during the day as means of relieving anxiety.

This has always been fine. I have seen doctors and neurologists who said that it wa a learned/conditioned behavior and that I was fine.

However, starting a couple of months ago, I find that after a head-banging episode I feel overwhelmingly anxious, have strange pressures and pains all over my head. Sometimes I'll head-bang and a pain will shoot randomly in my brain. My neck is often stiff afterwards and sometimes I feel confused and feel like my head is "full"

I have had about 5 episodes after headbanging where I feel extremely weird and have the sensation that I will pass out at any moment. I can only describe them as panic attacks. When this happens, I need to drink some water and lay down and after about 2 or so hours I'll feel better again. I have always been an excellent speller. However, I have noticed recently that my spelling abilites have degraded slightly.

I have absolutely no motor or vision problems. No tremors or anything like that.

I should also mention that I suffer from dysthymic disorder and am currently experiencing a terrible depressive episode. I don't know if all these symptoms are anxiety driven or if I'm inducing brain damage by banging my head. I have also been experiencing episodes of extreme fatigue. Again, I don't knowj if this is the depression or the headbanging.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. If there's anyt other relevant information, I am more than happy to provide it.

Thank you!

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6 Replies:

  • I am sure this is not the type of answer you expect.I suggest having a very healthy diet and lifestyle.Include a large proportion of fresh salads and fruit in your diet.Exercise regularly.There are many other things you can do as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle.People experiencing fatigue, usually feel much more energetic after including a large proportion of fresh fruit and salads in their diet. This will also improve your body chemistry, and may be beneficial in other ways.Exercise is a good way to relieve stress. Exercise during the day normally results in better sleep during the night.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2010
    • 04:20 AM
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  • I should also mention that I also feel mild nausea afterwards sometimes.
    collegestudent20 1 Replies
    • November 13, 2010
    • 04:28 AM
    • 0
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  • Honestly... you may be giving yourself whiplash. See some symptoms of it here http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/w/whiplash/symptoms.htmI know it will be difficult, but it might be a good idea to find a new 'release'
    gr8tful 175 Replies
    • November 13, 2010
    • 08:45 AM
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  • I have experienced severe emotional stress in my life.When I have had severe emotional stress, my spine became cold.Many people just wouldn't understand.While having severe emotional stress, my natural instinct is to shake my head wildly.I did this a little, but thought about it, and realized I could do myself an injury. So I used self discipline to stop myself doing it.As a matter of interest: Some people have had life go fairly smoothly, and have not experienced real difficulties. When they have a minor difficulty, they become very upset. After going through severely stressful situations, I have learned a lot, and deal with them much better now. As a result, in situations which would upset many other people, I can remain cool, calm and collected.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2010
    • 09:21 AM
    • 0
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  • Can you stop doing this? Or do you feel you must do it? It seems that if you CAN control it, you should control it. If not, you should see a psychologist/psychiatrist and get some help.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 16, 2010
    • 06:36 AM
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  • hello,i am a 20 year old male student. i have been headbanging in my sleep for my whole life. unlike you i dont know that i am doing it and do not wake up when i do it. You can find out much more about it here; http://www.sleepeducation.com/Disorder.aspx?id=18I have recently discovered that it is linked to stress and anxiety, and like you when i do when i am awake i find it relieves these feelings, although there is concern as to whether i might be inadvertantly damaging myself futrher. it also messes with my emotions and on nights that i do it, i often wake up depressed and spend the day feeling down. I dont know what to do but i feel that there might be an underlying psychological problem. I think my brain does not deal with stress very well... i just dont really know. think a trip to the doctor is in order. have u had anymore advice? x
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 2, 2010
    • 01:57 PM
    • 0
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