Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

11 Years of Skin-itch ***l

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 11 Replies
  • Posted By: IanDSamson
  • March 20, 2008
  • 02:13 PM

I was born with Infantile Eczema. About 11 years ago, I am 54 now, I started itching on the side of my neck. It wasn't much then, but became more widespread, across my shoulders, up the back of my neck, and down both arms. I would scratch incessantly at night. I consulted 5 dermatologists, 4 physicians (2 neurologists), aromatherapists, naturopaths, homeopaths, gaggles of General Practitioners (MDs), and have seriously considered consulting a neurosurgeon to isolate and terminate the nerve in my neck that tells my brain that my skin is itching. I have had cortisone in tablets, injections and creams, I have had the entire gambit of all medications, permutations, combinations, you name it, I have been on it. NO ONE has been able to find out what these "subcutaneous termites" are and how to eradicate them, so when I found this website I was excited. Hence this writing. Perhaps there is another person in this world having the same or similar problems, because not one doctor in South Africa has found an answer to this issue. No one has heard of it before. Everyone is quick to say DETOX, try CORTISONE, try this, try that, leave cream on your arms, try deworming tablets (duh!?), ... so I crush certain pills as directed by my MD and add to a face cream then spread on my arms to stop the itch, but it works temporarily. I am on AROPAX 12,5mg nocte, SIMVASTATIN (LDL cholesterol) nocte, and that's it. I also take multi-vitamins for senior men, and Vitamin B Complex. That's all. The only nocturnal relief I get is to place an ice-pack from the freezer directly on the affected area. Some dermatologists have suggested "stress-induced urticaria" although this has been refuted by others whose diagnosis is equally vague. Seriously, there are NO physicians or dermatologists in Johannesburg (South Africa) who really know what is causing this condition.
Maybe someone on this list has a similar experience? I would love to hear from you!
:confused:

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11 Replies:

  • Hello Blaze. Thanks for your response. I have never been bitten by a tick nor have I had "tick bite fever". Do you think this condition could be related to my cats?
    IanDSamson 6 Replies Flag this Response
  • Have you had any skin or RAST (blood) allergys done? check foods and enviromental allergys.
    stacky 52 Replies Flag this Response
  • I was born with Infantile Eczema. About 11 years ago, I am 54 now, I started itching on the side of my neck. It wasn't much then, but became more widespread, across my shoulders, up the back of my neck, and down both arms.Maybe someone on this list has a similar experience? I would love to hear from you!:confused:Hi Ian,I have hypothyroidism, specifically Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. When my condition is not controlled properly my eczema flares on my arms, shoulders, back, head, and neck.However, when I'm on the proper dose of thyroid medication, my symptoms disappear within a couple of weeks. The itching subsides within a couple of days.I wasn't born with the eczema. It appeared when my thyroid symptoms worsened in 2003.A multitude of different rashes can accompany thyroid disease. I have several other types of rashes as well. Hives are common too.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I used to have a problem with itching and other really weird skin feelings to the point where it was unbearable and i was almost driven to suicide so i completely sympathize with your condition. In my own case (I think I had morgellons).. daily baths of salt and bicarb soda (baking powder?) helped some. (I think having those baths long term, cured whatever my condition). The only way i could sleep due to the itchiness which I'd feel otherwise, was to often sleep in the bath in the salt and bicarb soda (I'd be in the bath for 4hrs every night). I used to use 1 kilogram of salt with 250 grams of the bicarbonate soda. (table salt is cheap and fine to use). Anyway i dont know if this will help you.. but it may be worth a go. You may thou find the salt like makes one even more itchy when one first gets in the bath..but after a time things settle down. (i used to rash up at first due to the salt but after months that stopped.. toxins coming out of the skin?? or parasites?? I dont know). One needs to spend at the very minumin 20 mins in the bath (even longer is better) daily.. doing this for a couple of weeks, to know if it's going to be any help.
    taniaaust1 2267 Replies Flag this Response
  • Have you had any skin or RAST (blood) allergys done? check foods and enviromental allergys.No, "stacky", not one MD ever tested my blood for allergies. The foods are okay as I am on the same diet as I have always been; but the "environmental allergies" are interesting - since washing the cats, the itch has diminished drastically! My MD says "cat mites" must have been behind the itch all along - as the itch started 11 years ago and that's when I last bathed the cats. My wife's "seasonal rhinitis" has also cleared up since I bathed the cats, 3 weeks ago. I will probably bath the cats more often now that the symptoms have diminished remarkably.:)
    IanDSamson 6 Replies Flag this Response
  • Ill bite...;) Check out this link... http://web.uct.ac.za/depts/porphyria/patient/pat-skin.htm You live in an area where there are a lot of porphyria patients due to an ancestor who came from Denmark.... so maybe get checked for this. BUT.... I can't believe you have not been screened for this already as drs there from what I have heard are more aware of this particular disease then in most areas of the world. :confused: The statin drugs can trigger porphyria attacks.... do you really need it? tdwi:D I was born with Infantile Eczema. About 11 years ago, I am 54 now, I started itching on the side of my neck. It wasn't much then, but became more widespread, across my shoulders, up the back of my neck, and down both arms. I would scratch incessantly at night. I consulted 5 dermatologists, 4 physicians (2 neurologists), aromatherapists, naturopaths, homeopaths, gaggles of General Practitioners (MDs), and have seriously considered consulting a neurosurgeon to isolate and terminate the nerve in my neck that tells my brain that my skin is itching. I have had cortisone in tablets, injections and creams, I have had the entire gambit of all medications, permutations, combinations, you name it, I have been on it. NO ONE has been able to find out what these "subcutaneous termites" are and how to eradicate them, so when I found this website I was excited. Hence this writing. Perhaps there is another person in this world having the same or similar problems, because not one doctor in South Africa has found an answer to this issue. No one has heard of it before. Everyone is quick to say DETOX, try CORTISONE, try this, try that, leave cream on your arms, try deworming tablets (duh!?), ... so I crush certain pills as directed by my MD and add to a face cream then spread on my arms to stop the itch, but it works temporarily. I am on AROPAX 12,5mg nocte, SIMVASTATIN (LDL cholesterol) nocte, and that's it. I also take multi-vitamins for senior men, and Vitamin B Complex. That's all. The only nocturnal relief I get is to place an ice-pack from the freezer directly on the affected area. Some dermatologists have suggested "stress-induced urticaria" although this has been refuted by others whose diagnosis is equally vague. Seriously, there are NO physicians or dermatologists in Johannesburg (South Africa) who really know what is causing this condition.Maybe someone on this list has a similar experience? I would love to hear from you!:confused:
    TaylorDeelwithit 382 Replies Flag this Response
  • Try an epsom salt soak.... magnesium in it is good for your system ;) quote=blaze;88052]Not just ticks carry Lyme. I got some of my infections from fleas and some from mosquitos. Also, the bull's eye rash isn't all that classic. Many Lymies have skin rashes, but they are often misdiagnosed as eczema or psoriasis or even contact dermatititis and acne. My rashes were intermittent - not constant, but I do get itching attacks frequently. Do you notice that these itching attacks seem to worsen when you are warm or perspiring? The only thing that seems to help my itching is if I sit in a tub of hot baking soda water until I sweat. I itch more initially, but once I sweat it subsides. I think it has a lot to do with metal toxicity, and I honestly think my electrosensitivities are equally responsible for the itch.
    TaylorDeelwithit 382 Replies Flag this Response
  • You need to find a good homeopathic doctor. You have something called a "nosode" and they need to treat it. You will experience relief and healing, but it will cost $$$.
    Monsterlove 2921 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well, well, what a load of diverse responses! I am amazed! From "porphyria" to "nosode" to "statins causing porphyria attacks". Wow!:confused: I need Simvastatin to control the cholesterol count - I know there are other drugs, but our medical aid scheme will not pay for them. They will subsidize Simvastatin only. I have been tested for porphyria and the result is negative. My 1st cousin (my mother's brother's daughter) has porphyria and really suffers with it - I think mainly exacerbated by her stressed out life - and she has tried hundreds of "remedies". While I am confident that washing the cats did help to stop the intense biting sensation, the normal "dry skin" syndrome will continue, and that's environmental - living on the "highveld" with our very dry winters - oils and creams, bath oils and moisturizers do nothing, and I cannot live on cortisone creams all the time! When I lived at the sea side for 6 years I did not itch once. I will say "no thanks" to "nosode" treatment having read up on this from a Google search. I would rather stick to traditional medicine.:mad: My MD says my condition was definitely related to unwashed cats and the mites they carry around with them and on them. Washing the cats has proved to be the most sensible answer to this dilemma.
    IanDSamson 6 Replies Flag this Response
  • I had a condition where my entire body itched and eventually it was determined that I was allergic to all types of chrome. Which is found in orange juice and vitamins and supplements. I was ingesting not only a high dosage but it had also built up in my system. It was my viatimins that were over the counter made by OLAY go figure.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 26, 2008
    • 09:18 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • Eventually, in utter desperation, my doctor prescribed an over-the-counter combination of aqueous cream and camphor crystals, similar to the shaving cream "PREP" available in many countries. To cut a long story short, this mixture works fine, but what has virtually stopped the entire 13-year skin itch ***l, is ensuring my STRESS level isn't too high. I must admit though that after the death of my favourite cat, Pascal II, in December, age 16, from intestinal cancer, the itch has virtually disappeared. Perhaps I was allergic to her fur.I will write more on my other medical experiences in other forums; these range from having had 3 coronaries (two in 2002 and one in 2009), 12 haemorrhoidectomies over a 12 year period (including many other procedures affecting that part of the body), eye lens replacements due to cataracts, full dental clearance, left varicocoelectomy, left epididymectomy, and am now facing further renal stone clearance, ?? prostatitis, ?? cystitis - and a visit to the Urologist in less than 24 hours from now (Sunday, 2/21/10 @ 12:35). What a wreck I am! :)
    IanDSamson 6 Replies
    • February 21, 2010
    • 10:36 AM
    • 0
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