Discussions By Condition: I cannot get a diagnosis.

10 year old with leg and thigh pain

Posted In: I cannot get a diagnosis. 11 Replies
  • Posted By: FustratedinCARY
  • August 3, 2008
  • 01:48 AM

My 10 year old is having intermittent leg and thigh pain, he is lethargic, angry against his older brother. But, so far he has no fever, normal labs, x-ray and mri are normal, too. Also, when he was 6 years old he had been diagnosed as having systemic JRA - 3 weeks at Duke Hospital and lots of steroids later, it took him a year to recover and now out of the blue he has unexplained leg, thigh and hip pain. This has been going on for several months. We are waiting for a Lyme test to come back. Also, someone brought to our attention a theory by Dr. Sherry in Philly (chop) where he believes the pain signal was distorted as a result of a traumatic event - such as arthritis.

Help! Any suggestions?

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11 Replies:

  • Is it in one or both legs? Does his spine seem to curve at all, side to side or front to back? Does he have any other symptoms? Is this similar to when he was diagnosed as having systemic jra? Any family history of... well.. anything? What exactly have they mri, xray, and cat scanned?
    qwertyuiop123 453 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks Quewrty. Replies are bolded Is it in one or both legs? Does his spine seem to curve at all, side to side or front to back? Both legs, plus shoulders. Spine curve is normal. Does he have any other symptoms? Mild depression when the pain is bad. Doesn't want to even play soccer - his favorite sports. "Says, it's too much running" Sometime, he says it hurts all over. When he is feeling better, his attitudeand moving around is much better. But, he has more pain, thenfeeling good occcasionally. Is this similar to when he was diagnosed as having systemic jra? This time no fever, no blood inflamation. So, it's similar. But, different. Originally, his whole body blew up and he had a high fever for 2 weeks. Also, a distended belly - he looked pregnant. It was bad!! Any family history of... well.. anything? Grandmother had growing pains. What exactly have they mri, xray, and cat scanned? MRI and cat scan - x-raying hips and legs Thanks Fustrated
    FustratedinCARY 4 Replies Flag this Response
  • I was wondering what kind of pain is it, burning, sharp shooting ect. IS there any changes in the skin? You mentioned about the Dr Sherry believing the pain signals are disorted. I know a great deal of this doctor, and usually what he means about the signals due to trauma he is thinking RSD. That is how I know of him, as I have RSD. I really hope that this isnt the case as RSD is a really painful disease. It can be caused from just bumping yourself to surgery, and sadly there is no cure, if it is caught 3 months into it then there is a chance for remission.
    nikiski1 35 Replies Flag this Response
  • I was thinking about his lower spine as well. Ask to have a MRI of his lumbar and sacral region. Pain is often felt in the thigh, leg and ankle when there is trouble in this area! Wishing you the best... Kiera
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I was wondering what kind of pain is it, burning, sharp shooting ect. IS there any changes in the skin? You mentioned about the Dr Sherry believing the pain signals are disorted. I know a great deal of this doctor, and usually what he means about the signals due to trauma he is thinking RSD. That is how I know of him, as I have RSD. I really hope that this isnt the case as RSD is a really painful disease. It can be caused from just bumping yourself to surgery, and sadly there is no cure, if it is caught 3 months into it then there is a chance for remission. He pain is described as throbbing. But, when it is at it's worst. He loses strength and he walks stiffly and slowly. Regarding Dr. Sherry. If it is RSD, we were encouraged that it could be fixed throigh intensive excercise. But, your comments are not so encouraging. His skin is normal. Also, I left off his Rheumy saw no Arthritis on his physical exam.
    FustratedinCARY 4 Replies Flag this Response
  • I was thinking about his lower spine as well. Ask to have a MRI of his lumbar and sacral region. Pain is often felt in the thigh, leg and ankle when there is trouble in this area! Wishing you the best... Kiera Thanks, Kiera. He had an MRI and X-Ray. Both were normal. They though his steroid treatment had zapped his hips. ( AVN) But, no problems there.
    FustratedinCARY 4 Replies Flag this Response
  • What exactly did they xray and mri? His spine, his hip, his knee, his ankle?
    qwertyuiop123 453 Replies Flag this Response
  • What exactly did they xray and mri? His spine, his hip, his knee, his ankle? Spine, hip amd legs
    FustratedinCARY 4 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hip pain Hip stiffness Abnormal gait Buttock pain Groin pain Thigh pain Restricted internal rotation Do these symptoms sound about right? If so here's a link http://wrongdiagnosis.com/o/osteoarthritis_hip/symptoms.htm#symptom_list I also found this on a website, it wasn't an entire article, it was just an abstract.SummaryObjectiveWe sought to determine whether sequence variations in cartilage collagen genes are associated with primary, early-onset osteoarthritis (OA). MethodsThe cartilage collagen genes, COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL9A3, COL11A1 and COL11A2, were screened for sequence variations in 72 Finnish probands and one US family with primary early-onset hip and/or knee OA. In addition, allelic association studies were performed using six to 12 common polymorphisms from each gene by genotyping 72 OA patients and 103 controls. ResultsAltogether 239 sequence variations were found, of which 16 were not present in the controls. Seven of the unique variations, four in COL11A1, two in COL11A2 and one in COL2A1, were studied further, because they resulted in the substitution of conserved amino acids or were predicted to affect mRNA splicing. Co-segregation of a sequence variation and the phenotype was found in all four families available for study. Association analysis failed to identify any common predisposing alleles. ConclusionsEarly-onset OA demonstrates locus and allelic heterogeneity since the identified variations were in three different collagen genes and each of the six probands had a different mutation. It is also possible that some OA cases represent the mild end of the chondrodysplasia phenotypic spectrum. The major susceptibility alleles in this form of OA, however, remain to be identified. I'm wondering if these same genes might be responsible for rheumatoid arthritis? It is also possible that if your son injured his hip or knee awhile ago, it could have caused osteoarthritis now.
    qwertyuiop123 453 Replies Flag this Response
  • I am in the same situation. when i was ten, my hip and thigh hurt to the point that i couldn't walk on it. i was put in the hospital for two weeks, MRI, x-rays, and labs all came back normal. my pain lasted for almost eight weeks and then with physical therapy it got better. then in sixth grade i had another episode, same symptoms, and everything came back normal. in seventh grade this happened twice and still no answer to this pain. and yet again, in eighth grade i had yet another episode. i have been to egleston (major hospital in atlanta, ga) eagles landing (another major hospital), a chiropractor (who has finally given me some relief, but not much, but enough to help get me through the week) and yet, i still have no answer as to what causes this pain....i wish i had an answer... well quick question, is his pain in the back of his hip, more towards the behind, or in the front of the hip? well i hope you find an answer, and i hope i can find an answer to....if you find an answer to his, will you e-mail me if you don't mind? i want an answer so bad... i mean, we seem to have the same symptoms, so i don't know.... my e-mail is rjb1116@yahoo.com. please e-mail me :) thanks again for sharing.
    rjb1116 4 Replies
    • November 1, 2008
    • 00:20 AM
    • 0
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  • My 10 year old is having intermittent leg and thigh pain, he is lethargic, angry against his older brother. But, so far he has no fever, normal labs, x-ray and mri are normal, too. Also, when he was 6 years old he had been diagnosed as having systemic JRA - 3 weeks at Duke Hospital and lots of steroids later, it took him a year to recover and now out of the blue he has unexplained leg, thigh and hip pain. This has been going on for several months. We are waiting for a Lyme test to come back. Also, someone brought to our attention a theory by Dr. Sherry in Philly (chop) where he believes the pain signal was distorted as a result of a traumatic event - such as arthritis. Help! Any suggestions?My son also has hip pain extending down his whole leg forever. It got worse and worse and could not get correct diagnonsis. We were given a new diagnosis every week and ended up going back. Needless to say, FINALLY he was given a correct diagnosis of "Neurovascular Dystrophy". He eventually ended up in a wheelchair, was out of school failing his classes and on all kind of medications so he could not function. he was very athletic and could no longer walk. a young boy of 13, the emotional trauma was so great and it not only effected his life but the whole family. He was diagnosed and after months of physical therapy (taking him off any medication) and home remedies, he went into "remission" and started living on Advil. Slowly, he was back to normal. It took alot of work, and emotional trauma. Any stress on the child can bring it back. Dr. Sherry is most likely correct in his findings. We went to a Pediatric Rheumatologist at Westchester Medical Center in NY. Dr. Homm. She knew right away and began treatment right away. My son plays sports, leads a regular life, and is once again a happy little boy. Relapses are very common and when that happens you need to put on those kid gloves once more. Usually RSD is caused by trauma to a limb. We had every MRI, etc. under the sun and could not get anywhere. Its very frustrating and hurtful to us as parents. So hard to diagnose because its not really common. See a neurologist, if you arent happy w/that one see another one. Bring up the idea of Sympathetic Reflex Dystrophy because that is what it sounds like to me. What we went through is horrible and the emotional trauma to a very active child can be devastating. However, dont give up and be very determined to make it go away. My son has had this for 3 years, he has an occasional "relapse" every once in awhile and we deal with it, move on, and he goes into "remission". Normal life can be lived for y our child.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 23, 2009
    • 11:31 AM
    • 0
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