Discussions By Condition: Gallbladder conditions

vitamin b12 deficiency and gallbladder removal

Posted In: Gallbladder conditions 13 Replies
  • Posted By: nemomom
  • March 26, 2009
  • 01:33 AM

I wondered if anyone thinks there is a connection between gallbladder removal and vitamin b12 deficiency. My symptoms of b12 deficiency started 6 months to a year after getting my gallbladder removed. Just wondered if this has happened to anyone else.

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  • yes! I have all of the symptoms EXCEPT red blood cell issues but i feel seriously anemic or like I have a B12 problem. I am 20 and had my col. about 4 months ago, symptoms so much worse after surgery I cant go to school and no dr. has any idea, keeps blaming on recovery time.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I had my Gallbladder removed 6 years ago after having excruciating attacks for over 6 months (every 2 days) - No insurance! After removal, I had no problems for years. Then started having anxiety issues, loss of balance, pain and numbness in legs, blurred vision, speech trouble, awkward gate, trouble comprehending directions, fatigue and confusion. I was so scared! My Family Dr said - depression. I said - I don't have anything to be depressed about. Several blood tests and lots of complaining got me a referral for a Neurologist. Loved him, he tested everything - not comfortable tests either. He ran the gamut, but all he could find was VERY low levels of B12. I also told him, since my GB attacks, I'm now allergic to alcoholic drinks! He didn't think to compare the 2 no matter what I said. But we tried every form of ingestible B12, then re-tested with very little improvement. I now inject monthly, which is great - because I feel better fast! I not good about tracking my injections so that I get it in on a timely basis, but when my legs start to hurt, I get a needle ready! I still get online to research what, why and how. I suggest reading about a lack of the intrinsic factor, and overgrowth of bacteria in the digestive system. hope this helps, I'm still looking for the answer and taking my shots monthly!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I wondered if anyone thinks there is a connection between gallbladder removal and vitamin b12 deficiency. My symptoms of b12 deficiency started 6 months to a year after getting my gallbladder removed. Just wondered if this has happened to anyone else. Yes, I've had a B-12 problem along with a gallbladder problem, without even having the gallbladder removed, and I've read of other cases where the two things have seemed to begin fairly close to each other in time. I've also read an explanation claiming that it's because a malfunctioning gallbladder cannot do its job of helping us digest the fat-soluble vitamins. But, according to my recent Google search, B-12 is water-soluble, not fat-soluble, so I'm not sure about that explanation. Whatever the reason, I do think you're on the right track in thinking that the two things are related somehow.
    AgnosticJaz 23 Replies Flag this Response
  • I had my gallbladder removed over a year ago and now I have low b12 and low d why is this happening?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I had my Gallbladder removed 6 years ago after having excruciating attacks for over 6 months (every 2 days) - No insurance! After removal, I had no problems for years. Then started having anxiety issues, loss of balance, pain and numbness in legs, blurred vision, speech trouble, awkward gate, trouble comprehending directions, fatigue and confusion. I was so scared! My Family Dr said - depression. I said - I don't have anything to be depressed about. Several blood tests and lots of complaining got me a referral for a Neurologist. Loved him, he tested everything - not comfortable tests either. He ran the gamut, but all he could find was VERY low levels of B12. I also told him, since my GB attacks, I'm now allergic to alcoholic drinks! He didn't think to compare the 2 no matter what I said. But we tried every form of ingestible B12, then re-tested with very little improvement. I now inject monthly, which is great - because I feel better fast! I not good about tracking my injections so that I get it in on a timely basis, but when my legs start to hurt, I get a needle ready! I still get online to research what, why and how. I suggest reading about a lack of the intrinsic factor, and overgrowth of bacteria in the digestive system. hope this helps, I'm still looking for the answer and taking my shots monthly!If you get an answer do let us know. I had my GB out 2 months ago, and last sunday I was rushed into A&E because I couldnt breath. I also have painful legs and tingley hand. They thought it might be an allergic reaction, I had one glass of alcohol a few hours before and felt really light headed. Could this also be an allergic reaction to alcohol... I'd be very bummed if it was. I am also on glucophage which can cause vit B12 def. I didnt know this until I started to research it myself cos the doctors had no idea what was wrong with me.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi,If you were given nitrous oxide (laughing gas) during surgery (commonly used as an anesthetic), it will wipe out your body's store of Vitamin B12. This is true for everyone. If you have any difficulty absorbing B12, due to lack of intrinsic factor (pernicious anemia), celiac's disease or other reasons, you will NOT be able to replace the lost vitamins by diet or using vitamin tablets. In these cases, neural symptoms will usually develop very quickly, for me it was within a matter of days. The shot worked wonders for me. I went about 5 years with increasing neural problems and now take 1 cc every 3 weeks. Major symptoms went away the next day although some of the damage is permanent. If this sounds familiar and your B12 level is low, take several shots a week until your B12 levels are well within normal. Daily sublingual tablets also an option. B12 levels are also affected by alcohol consumption and diets low in meat and dairy. Also of possible note, I had my gallbladder removed when I was 36 because it was full of small stones and since then I have codeine sensitivy - get gallstone-like pain within an hour of taking a T3 even though I had taken T1's or T3 for most of my adult life.C.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi,If you were given nitrous oxide (laughing gas) during surgery (commonly used as an anesthetic), it will wipe out your body's store of Vitamin B12. This is true for everyone. If you have any difficulty absorbing B12, due to lack of intrinsic factor (pernicious anemia), celiac's disease or other reasons, you will NOT be able to replace the lost vitamins by diet or using vitamin tablets. In these cases, neural symptoms will usually develop very quickly, for me it was within a matter of days. The shot worked wonders for me. I went about 5 years with increasing neural problems and now take 1 cc every 3 weeks. Major symptoms went away the next day although some of the damage is permanent. If this sounds familiar and your B12 level is low, take several shots a week until your B12 levels are well within normal. Daily sublingual tablets also an option. B12 levels are also affected by alcohol consumption and diets low in meat and dairy. Also of possible note, I had my gallbladder removed when I was 36 because it was full of small stones and since then I have codeine sensitivy - get gallstone-like pain within an hour of taking a T3 even though I had taken T1's or T3 for most of my adult life.C.The cyanocobalamin B-12 was not helping me at all. I still felt pretty fatigued after the injection and didn't feel much of a change after being on it for over two months.http://www.vitaminddeficiencysymptomsguide.com/vitamin-b12-deficiency-symptoms/
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • This may be a chicken and egg scenario. At the Pernicious Anaemia Society (PAS) we're trying to understand if the underlying progress to the full blown B12 deficiency has as one of it's side effects the formation of gall stones due to increased cholesterol. The removal of the gall bladder and the diagnosis of the B12 deficiency have occurred almost simultaneously in a number of indiviuals who have since joined the PAS.Others have reported that once starting on B12 injections (either hydroxocobalimin in the UK or cyanocobalamin in the USA) that their cholesterol levels have dropped.For further information and support on B12 deficiency and it's related side effect and complications see: www.pernicious-anaemia-society.org.The nerve damage part of the B12 deficiency is the most serious and in many cases there is no recovery.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 12, 2010
    • 00:44 AM
    • 0
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  • :confused:I had my GB removed Feb.'05 and took my first shot of B12 today. I'm not sure if I am taking the right dose or if it will help. I am taking the cyanocobalamin, I could not find the hydroxocobalamin (which I read is preferred). I am afraid that my neurological problems are permanent. This may be a chicken and egg scenario. At the Pernicious Anaemia Society (PAS) we're trying to understand if the underlying progress to the full blown B12 deficiency has as one of it's side effects the formation of gall stones due to increased cholesterol. The removal of the gall bladder and the diagnosis of the B12 deficiency have occurred almost simultaneously in a number of indiviuals who have since joined the PAS. Others have reported that once starting on B12 injections (either hydroxocobalimin in the UK or cyanocobalamin in the USA) that their cholesterol levels have dropped. For further information and support on B12 deficiency and it's related side effect and complications see: www.pernicious-anaemia-society.org. The nerve damage part of the B12 deficiency is the most serious and in many cases there is no recovery.
    WildMystery 8 Replies
    • September 14, 2010
    • 01:17 AM
    • 0
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  • I wondered if anyone thinks there is a connection between gallbladder removal and vitamin b12 deficiency. My symptoms of b12 deficiency started 6 months to a year after getting my gallbladder removed. Just wondered if this has happened to anyone else.I had my gall bladder out two years ago and recently my B12 levels have been 232 received a B12 shot waited 4 months and now my B12 level is 183. Yesterday, my doctor told me the average range is 350 and ordered a B12 shot every week for the next four weeks and then once monthly for four months after that. Are there foods we can eat to supplement the B12 naturally.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 15, 2010
    • 05:00 PM
    • 0
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  • Please be careful.....I was dianosed with Gall Stones and Kidney Cancer at the same time. I had my right kidney and gall bladder removed at the same time by two different surgeons. It wasn't until my feet went numb four years later that I was finally dianosed with Vitamin B12 deficiency. I could not absorb Vitamin B12 through the digestive tract and wound up taking sublingual doses. My feet have full-blown nueropathy with little hope of getting any feeling back. Do not let it go unchecked, please.
    frank140 1 Replies
    • January 15, 2012
    • 11:41 AM
    • 0
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  • SURGERY ITSELF (if it involves Nitrous Oxide and perhaps other things) can deplete your B12 stores if you are already borderline-low. Read the book "COULD IT BE B12?" -- it covers this among many other things. B12 deficiency can manifest in a lot of different symptoms - dizziness, numbness, weakness, lack of concentration, forgetfulness, lethargy, pains, (and much much more) and it sounds like those of you who had surgery might very well have been low on B12. That is why after-surgery the symptoms become much worse. Please research this. SO MANY ills seem to have a root cause in B12 and/or folate defiiciency but doctors are not informed of this.
    klmjoj 1 Replies
    • January 22, 2013
    • 03:11 AM
    • 0
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  • Your vitamin B12 deficiency is not necessarily what you have to do Gall Bladder Surgery is the only reason, if it is lack of vitamins can supplement by drugs and infusion. Obviously, your body also lack of other things, the doctor cured taking extreme treatment. Your doctor also is a real possibility, of course, not so professional, his cognition, there is no other way to treat your illness.
    tom1989 1 Replies Flag this Response
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