Discussions By Condition: Gallbladder conditions

Ruptured Gallbladder surgery after pregnancy - NEED INFO PLEASE!

Posted In: Gallbladder conditions 9 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • December 12, 2006
  • 06:14 PM

Hi,

My name is Patty and I am here out of desparation. I need some answers.

My story: This is dog related and I am looking for human diagnosis to compare.

My 3 1/2 year old female Labrador, Miya, just recently underwent emergency surgery to have a ruptured gallbladder removed and almost didn't survive. She had septisemia, peritonitis, puss in the abdomin, edema, etc. Her gallbladder was green and black. This is very rare in dogs, especially one so young.

What would cause a gallbladder to go bad in such a young dog causing a rupture? My vets are stumped as well as her surgeon

Thankfully she is recovered and all levels are back in the normal range ie; albumin, liver, total protein.

I am desparately trying to figure out what caused this to prevent it in my other Labradors.

She had a litter in June of this year and was hospitalized on 11/6/06 for her gallbladder surgery.

I have heard that gallbladder problems are hormonal in women. Know 2 people that had to have their gallbladder removed after giving birth - and were advised to do so if they planned to have more children. Anyone out there been thru this?

I have Miya's 6 month old daughter and plan on breeding her when she is of correct age, etc. I want to prevent this from happening to her (even though it was a freak thing with Miya.)

I plan on doing blood work (on female with intact gallbladdr) prior to, during and after pregnancy checking total bilirubin and if levels are off need to know what to supplement with that is safe and natural during pregnancy and nursing.

Miya had full blood work 1 month prior to breeding and all levels were normal.

One more question: For anyone who went thru this. Did you have more children after removal of GB and did you have any liver problems because of it. Or, even if you had no more children - any liver problems after GB removal?

I know this is a "human" forum and I thank anyone who can help me. I can find very little info on dog sites.

Patty Snow
Snowco Labradors
www.snowcolabradors.com

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9 Replies:

  • Is there really no one on this forum who has experienced what I have described? I thought I could get some help here. Maybe I was wrong. Very dissappointed.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 2, 2007
    • 09:28 PM
    • 0
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  • I love dogs and would like to share some of my experience.I had severe pains since I was 18 and eventually when I was 28 and pregnant with my first child I was diagnosed with gallstones. I was rushed into surgery to remove the gallbladder. Mine too was really a mess and almost gangrenous. I went on to have my second child with no problems but with my third I was hospitalised with cholestasis. It felt just like gallbladder attack but of course couldn't be. Baby and me were fine and I only occasionally get pains in my liver and nausea when I drink strong coffee. I think that pregnancy causes a change in the blood cholestorol levels(don't quote me as this is from memory 5 yrs ago) due to hormones which is why gallstones flare up more in pregnancy. Also it is hereditary for some like me who get it so young. Also diet is eally big. Maybe your dog's food was too rich? I hope you find out some more info. Fuchsia
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 8, 2007
    • 07:14 AM
    • 0
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  • Thank you so much for your response. I have since spoken with a number of vets/surgeons who specialize in this field and all say that this is not hormonal. She is on a high quality kibble only 15% fat so I don't think her food was an issue. The liver pain you experience is interesting. Miya's levels have been in the normal range for liver so I think we are okay there. She is doing fine and I check all her levels thru blood work about once a month. Thank you again for taking the time to help me. Patty
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 8, 2007
    • 04:02 PM
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  • First of all, althought K9's are man's best friend, dogs are not humans and cannot be diagnosed in the same way that humans are. For example: chocolate can potentially kill dogs. Chocolate is an antioxidant for humans and won't kill us. Trying to get answers by comparing diagnosis' in humans is probably not the best way.If you said yourself that it was a "freak" occurance in your dog, there's no logical reason as to why it would happen to your dogs pups. There are reasons why this happens in humans, but for the most part, it's fairly unexplainable, which i suspect as is in the case of your dog. It's not really an answer, but it's the best anyone can come up with, and that is: "it happens"
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 13, 2007
    • 08:54 PM
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  • Thanks for your reply. I have been breeding Labs for 38 years and am very well aware that humans and dogs are different. I am not looking for a diagnosis just a question about hormonal issues. Thanks anyway. I no longer need any responses as experts have answered my questions. By the way dogs also have strokes, heart attacks, kidney failure, etc. just like humans. There are some coralations(sp) and the diagnosing thru blood work is done the same in both dogs and people in Kidney failure for instance. BUN, Creatinine, phosphorous. I think I might have also mentioned coming to this forum as a last resort because I was having trouble getting answers in the canine world. Thanks again for your responses.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 13, 2007
    • 09:35 PM
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  • My 1 1/2 year old female labrador passed away from a Ruptured Gallbladder on Sunday, she was also 2 weeks pregnant. Unforunatley, she did not display any warning signs, and once we got her to the vet, the septisma had already set in and there was nothing they could do. At the point of diagnosis, her liver and kidney readings were exceptionally high and this was the focus of the diagnosis. I have been advised one contributing factor could have been e-coli which is present in the stomach, however should be contained there. Apparantly, the e-coli can travel back to the gallblader, hence causing infection, inflammation and eventual rupture. I too was advised this was a freak incident, however after reading this post, I am concerned that the pregnancy may also be a contributing factor, If only we had of known, we would have never had her bred. Defiantly a harsh way to loose a pet.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I am so so sorry for your loss of your girl and her babies. Just awful and I know how you feel coming so close to losing Miya twice. I appreciate your response to my post as I haven't gotten much feed back. The e-coli is an interesting theory and not one I have heard from my vet, surgeon or any experts in this area of gallbladder issues. I will be sure to tell my vet about this. Can you tell me what state you are located in and was this your regular vet or were you at a university hospital? I'm sure my vet is going to be interested in that as well as we have not heard about this e-coli theory. Please don't blame yourself for breeding your girl. All the research I have done and feed back from said experts tell me that this is not a hormonal issue and has nothing to do with Miya having recently whelped a litter. Experts have even said there is no reason she can't be bred again next year without a gallbladder. I, however, am not even considering that and I continue to monitor her levels and was, in fact, just at the vet this morning for a blood draw. Her levels have been normal for about the past 5 months so, so far so good. Miya did exhibit symptoms (of something being wrong). Vomitting on Fri. night (6-8 times), lack of appetite, lethargic and an increasing temp. that got to 104.8 on Sunday and that was when I took her in for the ultrasound. This was an emergency explatory surgery as the ultrasound didn't pin point anything but blood was drawn from the abdomin and they knew something was wrong. It is truly a miracle that she survived. If you are interested in talking further you can email me thru my web site www.snowcolabradors.com or continue here. Again, I am so sorry for your loss. It is never easy. Prayers for you and your family for your loss and grief.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I am in Syney Australia. After reading your post I spoke with my vet and advised of another lab who was pregnant when the rupture occured- she is going to do more research into that now. Also, one thing that may interest you is another possible contributing factor could have been Dorey (my lab) ate a poisionis mushroom (which we unfortunatley did have in the back yard at the time). Although this was only a possibility, the vet explained that the posion may have been the reason the e-coli was able to travel back to the gallbladder, hence the infection/ inflamation etc. Now i know the warning signs, Dorey did vomit on 2 seperate days, twice each day, the first time was after i gave her a treat of chicken necks ( i thought they may not have agreed with her), and doreys temperment was one that is sleepy and lazy- so this behaviour was normal for her. Although i know we can never replace her, we will have a very hard time trying to choose another puppy, by mating her we were hoping to keep one of her puppies...
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks for your reply. Please note: Miya was "not" pregnant at the time of her rupture. She had a litter of pups on June 13, 2006 and she ruptured on or about November 5, 2006. The poisonous mushroom is interesting too and may have very well played a roll. I will be speaking to my vet later today and it will be intereting to hear his thoughts on this and the e-coli. All the experts I have spoken to have told me that this situation is very rare in dogs, especially one so young and healthy (full blood work done in March 2006 and all normal) and it is not a genetic or hereditary condition. I know how hard it is to lose as beloved Lab but you will find the right pup when you are ready. I wish you all the best in your search. If my vet has any more theories I'll let you know. And interested to hear what your vet has to say. BTW - Miya's surgeon, Dr. Hunt, is Australian :-) Patty
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
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