Discussions By Condition: Foot conditions

Random, intermittent, itch on feet; not fungal, not bacterial, not nerve damage

Posted In: Foot conditions 0 Replies
  • Posted By: zotz27
  • June 9, 2010
  • 02:40 AM

Hi, this is my first post here. I'm posting this in case anyone has had this problem - I want to share how I finally got it under control.

For about 10 years, I've had a random, intermittant itch on my feet. It comes and goes, and hits different spots, like the sole one time, then a toe, then up top, then a side, etc. Sometimes this would last for up to 72 hours straight, with no sleep, no rest, nothing worked. This would get so bad that, after a day or two, I'd catch myself thinking that amputation might not be such a bad thing after all. I saw the podiatrists, the doctors, the allergists, the neurologists - they had nothing. Even saw a psychiatrist. They could confirm that it was not fungal, not bacterial, no signs of any infection. I had that test where they taser your legs and test the nerve response, and they said that my nerves were just fine. I didn't have a diabetic neuropathy. Creams didn't help (Tiger Balm, capsaicin, steroids like hydrocortisone and mometasone furoate). Hot didn't work. Sometimes cold would work, but usually only for as long as the ice was one (i'd get some sleep by ace bandaging a big ice pack to my foot). Cymbalta didn't help. The only real relief I'd get is to dig my fingernails into the site, and the pain overwhelmed the itch (and I really didn't mind the pain - it got rid of the itch) but that was temporary and limited to the time I could keep my fingernails dug in. Finally, I turned to alternative medicine. Chiropractic didn't help this one, BUT ACCUPUNCTURE DID! Just by coincidence, I had an attack right in the accupuncturists' office (he's also an MD). He stuck a needle in between my toes and within 5 minutes the itch was gone! And it didn't come right back, either. He taught me how to do this to myself, and, while the itch attacks still come randomly, I now can do something and, usually, they go away in 5-10 minutes.

If anyone has this kind of thing, please, please try a medical accupuncturist (it's better than wanting to cut your foot off!).

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