Discussions By Condition: Dental conditions

Really confused...

Posted In: Dental conditions 0 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • February 15, 2007
  • 09:23 PM


I'm not sure if I should see a doctor or a dentist. About a week ago I was sick. Not sure if it was a virus or something I ate, but it was 24 hours of throwing up, etc. After each time I would throw up I would get a tremendous flash of heat that would leave me wringing wet with sweat. After 24 hours it was gone. 2-3 days later, I woke up in the middle of the night and my gums or my teeth at the gum line on the left side of my face (top and bottom) were hurting (hurting isn't the right word...its more like a burning sensation or a sensation like the gum is being stretched). This has continued for 4-5 days now. I'm in Michigan. About two weeks before I got sick, the temp here really got cold outside. Since being sick, after I go outside, when I come back in and my body heats up, I get the same sensation. Also, any time I lie down I get the sensation after 15-20 minutes. It's enough to wake me up, but if I sit up right away it just goes away. If I don't catch it in time, putting anything cool in my mouth will make it go away in seconds (this is what I must do also when my body temp is up...like coming inside). But the one thing I've found to be common besides every time I lay down is that the only time it happens "non-laying down" is when my body temperature goes up. As a test last night (believe me I'm not crazy...it was a quick test and I had liquid on hand), I got into our spa (indoors) and sure enough, after about 10 minutes it started...while I was sitting and not laying. Two days ago, the temp here got above 20 for the first time in 3 and a half weeks. That day, I did not have much of an issue, slept like a baby that night (really needed it) and thought I was over it...but yesterday (temp went to -1 and hasn't got above the 15 it is out there now) it's back. It does not hurt to eat or drink hot or cold...although I must admit that I don't chew ice or drink steamy drinks anyway...just regular refridgerated stuff for cold / normal coffee type temps on the hot side. I can find no tooth or spot on my gums that are swollen...I can't even find a sore spot. My gums feel normal (but I don't normally "feel" my gums and to be honest I'm not poking around a whole lot more than just touching (probing) for fear of actually causing some damage somewhere). When it "hurts", it's the whole side, but it may be limited to top - bottom - or both. If I hold cool liquid in my mouth, I can lay down until I swallow or spit it out...it does not matter how much liquid or where it is placed in my mouth (like in one cheek, even the opposite side or under the tongue). It almost reminds me of swelling taking place somewhere and the cool is calming and/or shrinking the swelling...but why only when my body temp raises and not when I eat or drink (put hot right there). An infection? But where? One last thing to add because it stands out to me. The first time I threw up, sweated, etc...I made the mistake (hindsight) of drinking several very large glasses of orange juice. This of course, was the next thing I experienced in the bathroom. I did not brush my teeth (I was afraid to even rinse my mouth after the orange juice came back on me) until the episode was over (approx 24 hrs.). I do however recall that the orange juice made my whole mouth "burn" (probably too strong a description...have a slight burning sensation maybe is more like it) when it reversed course (so to speak).

I realize that was tremendously long, but I wanted to have it all out there for any one that may have experienced something similar. I'm all too ready to try anything...if it's not gone by the start of the week I'll be talking I guess first to my dentist. Oh yeah...I do not have a temperature although the first time I checked that was last night.

Regards and thank you for the posting site...


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