Discussions By Condition: Colon conditions

Living without an ascending colon?

Posted In: Colon conditions 23 Replies
  • Posted By: garbovatwin
  • June 4, 2008
  • 11:03 PM

I have been offered an elective laparoscopically surgical removal of the ascending colon after numerous tests for chronic lower right abdomen pain.

Can anyone offer what life is like with half a colon?

garbova

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23 Replies:

  • Hi there, sorry today/nite ive bn sharing what little information i have on different problems.....so bare with me, as far as i am aware removal of partial colon should not have any lasting problems that i know off. Why i say this i know of two people who have had colonostomys (sorry spelling ?) which is the removal of the bowel & bringing stoma through to the abdomin, therefore they now use a colostomy bag (sorry spelling again) anyway, my point is that removal of part of the bowel should be much easier to cope with than this, actually now that i think of it my friends father had this procedure done & he coped with it very well. There might be small differences but compared to a colonostomy bag I think this procedure should be easier to cope with. I hope u can make sense of this & that it helps a little. Best wishes :) Sorry about spelling but im sure u will get the point.:D
    Tootsie 628 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi there, sorry today/nite ive bn sharing what little information i have on different problems.....so bare with me, as far as i am aware removal of partial colon should not have any lasting problems that i know off. :DHello TootsieYes, i was able to understand it quite well. Thank you for your input and comforting words.garbova
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • After much research and speaking with other doctors, I have decided not to have a resection. I am open to a lapro cecopexy where they create a peritoneal flap to hold the HEALTHY mobile colon in place.garbova
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well that sounds good, hope it all goes well for u. Let me know how u get on. Kind regards :)
    Tootsie 628 Replies Flag this Response
  • Well that sounds good, hope it all goes well for u. Let me know how u get on. Kind regards :)Why thank you luv.garbova;)
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • Have you tried alternative therapies? Chinese Medicine, naturopathy, dietary therapy, ayervedic...anything?? Just wondering,Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies Flag this Response
  • Have you tried alternative therapies? Chinese Medicine, naturopathy, dietary therapy, ayervedic...anything?? Just wondering,Best wishesDOMNot yet, but i will certainly look into it. The problem is the free section of ascending colon. It is perfectly normal other than movement, so I am unsure as to what might help keep it in place. I have been communicating with therapists as to whether colon massage might help strengthen and stimulate it to just perform as it has most of my life. Although I feel like I am 30 years old most of the time, I guess my 57 year old body is starting to say otherwise. I wish I had my 30 year old abdomen...;) Thank you for your kind recommendations and well wishes.garbova:rolleyes:
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • Not yet, but i will certainly look into it. The problem is the free section of ascending colon. It is perfectly normal other than movement, so I am unsure as to what might help keep it in place. I have been communicating with therapists as to whether colon massage might help strengthen and stimulate it to just perform as it has most of my life. Although I feel like I am 30 years old most of the time, I guess my 57 year old body is starting to say otherwise. I wish I had my 30 year old abdomen...;) Thank you for your kind recommendations and well wishes. garbova:rolleyes: Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine is extremely helpful and I would recommend it highly. This form of medicine can help with prolapses of the organs, and can help strengthen and promote healing at the tissues and joints. Please do research this as I think it would help. IMO surgery should always be a last resort when other complimentary modalities have at least been tried.Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies Flag this Response
  • Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine is extremely helpful and I would recommend it highly. This form of medicine can help with prolapses of the organs, and can help strengthen and promote healing at the tissues and joints. Please do research this as I think it would help. IMO surgery should always be a last resort when other complimentary modalities have at least been tried.Best wishesDOMThank you again DOM. stay beautifulg.
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • Without an acending colon I have softer stools and about 3 bowel movements in the morning. There must be bile in the movements that require me to clean myself with preparation H wipes otherwise, I will have burning from the bile. I frequently have to get up early in the morning to have a bowel movement. I believe the acending colon removes moisture and bile from the stool and naturally it holds more waste.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Without an acending colon I have softer stools and about 3 bowel movements in the morning. There must be bile in the movements that require me to clean myself with preparation H wipes otherwise, I will have burning from the bile. I frequently have to get up early in the morning to have a bowel movement. I believe the acending colon removes moisture and bile from the stool and naturally it holds more waste.RobertThank you for sharing what it can be like without an ascending colon. Since my symptoms that led me into the discovery of having a mobile cecum/colon have waned, and i appear to be asymptomatic presently, my surgical team advised waiting until if/when having this condition affects my quality of life, at which time we will opt for a resection, or, if the bowel if viable as it is now, a lap cecopexy/appendectomy to secure it in place.I am not being too overly optimistic that surgery can be avoided. My body still tells me otherwise. Time will tell i suppose.If you would care to share why your colon was removed i am very interested.Thank you again.g.
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
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  • In 2000, just before my 21st bday I had all but 2 cm of my colon removed. Almost the whole shebang. I never had a colostomy bag. I had what is called a subtotal colectomy and it was done all in one step. I will have surgical staples in my abdomen holding things in place for the rest of my life. So good news is that I had it done for toxic megacolon which caused chronic constipation since. My mother also had the same surgery preformed 7 years before me. Life without a colon is complicated. It took years for me be able to tolerate vegetables, several other foods are still off my menu as they cause terrible issues. At first after the operation, you will go to the bathroom frequently and with sudden urges. It lessens with time. I still go on average of 5 or 6 times a day. Another thing to worry about with any bowel removal is bowel obstructions, blockages, and twists. I was in and out of the hospital with all for up to a year after surgery as complications. Also I suffer from weakening at the rejoining and have to undergo an argon laser during a flex sigmoid colonoscopy atleast once a year to prevent bleeding into digestive track. Depending on your medical history and what surgery is for depends on how you approach it as beneficial. For me it was life saving no matter the complications. At time of surgery I had been on a liquid diet for 12 weeks and still not passed stool from before diet change. :-( So it was worth the pain. My mother seems to have coped quite well with her surgery, however they took out her entire colon and a few inches of her small bowel at the same time. She tolerates vegetables well, only has to avoid seeds and sausage. Not sure if any of this helps you, but thought you should know. I have been offered an elective laparoscopically surgical removal of the ascending colon after numerous tests for chronic lower right abdomen pain. Can anyone offer what life is like with half a colon? garbova
    nikilotta7 43 Replies Flag this Response
  • Not sure if any of this helps you, but thought you should know.I want to thank you for responding to my post. Your words are very descriptive and quite helpful. We are in a 'wait and see' approach to my colon problems, but being the realist that I am, at some point removal of part of the colon is in the cards. It can be quite unnerving when we have to come to grips with surgery that will alter our lives or quality of life, but we are a resilient species, and life goes on.Thank you so much for your post.Stay well.garbova
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks a lot for sharing! My husband needs subtotal colectomy (never entirely understood why it's called subtotal if they actually remove the WHOLE colon). A colonoscopy revealed multiple, some large, wide spread throughout the colon, polyps. We are both worried about life after colon removal, although he was assured many people have had it and live normal lives. We would very much like to hear from more patients, with as many details as possible, about recovery and adjusting to life without a colon.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thanks a lot for sharing! My husband needs subtotal colectomy (never entirely understood why it's called subtotal if they actually remove the WHOLE colon). A colonoscopy revealed multiple, some large, wide spread throughout the colon, polyps. We are both worried about life after colon removal, although he was assured many people have had it and live normal lives. We would very much like to hear from more patients, with as many details as possible, about recovery and adjusting to life without a colon.hello. The extent of polyps must be far more than they can maintain by today's medical standards to want to remove the entire colon. Have the surgeons sat down with you and showed you the extent of the condition? I assume that before a surgeon suggests removal of any organ they explain and show you why they are suggesting that route for surgery.It is called a subtotal colectomy because they do not resection any portion of the anus. They remove the colon only, reattaching the small intestine to the anus for the elimination of waste. I believe in this case, they will try to reattach the small intestine this way during this surgery, but if it cannot be reattached successfully at this surgery, they create a stoma to have the wasted come out through the abdominal wall into a bag that catches the waste. This is called an ileostomy. Life without an entire colon was actually described for me by my surgeon. I told him I was not keen on having my viable fully functioning mobile ascending colon removed simply because it moves. He explained that the ascending colon is the part of the colon that pulls moisture from the rather loose waste coming out of the small intestine. Without it, I could expect a few more bowel movements per day, they would be looser or could border on diarrhea. At times, the bowel movement could be an urgent one. He then went on to explain how we can easily live without a colon, as it is the waste eliminator in our systems. In a procedure like the one they have in mind for your husband, he can expect a very loose bowel movement more frequently without a colon. One cannot live without a small intestine.I am still in a waiting period for finding out exactly how my surgical team wishes to proceed. In my case, my cecum and ascending colon are turned up and to the left. The danger with this is that if it decides to twist, it can cut off blood to that section of colon initiating gangrene and perhaps rupture. I am as I said, not ready to approve the removal of a viable part of my colon simply because it moves. I have asked them to perform a cecopexy with a peritoneal flap to secure its mobility in place, a procedure that has a very high success record in other parts of the world. They frown upon it because of some pioneers in the procedure decades ago documenting that it had a high reoccurence, which it did, but not so with todays procedure that requires a peritoneal flap.In the U.S.A. the medical profession at times is all to quick to REMOVE a problem rather than try all options to FIX a problem. I am a perfect example. If i simply listened to my surgical team, my colon would be removed already, yet here I am, still having bouts with the discomfort and at times pain caused by a colon that simply moves, but having healthy bowel movements nonetheless. So I researched it, and made my suggestion for a procedure to proceed with. I am currently waiting for vacations to end for medical staff members to meet with them again and discuss surgery. The cecopexy in my case would have to be an open procedure.Did they say HOW they would remove your husbands colon? Would it be an open procedure or a laparoscopic one? If it is an open procedure, you may want to mention the use of something like SEPRAFILM during surgery that has a high success record in preventing or minimizing the formation of adhesions, something we ALL get after any surgery, ESPECIALLY after open abdominal surgery. Adhesions can cause a high incidence of small bowel obstruction when they form. There is no escaping the formation of adhesions which are scar tissue our bodies begin forming the minute they enter the abdominal cavity, BUT they can be minimized or prevented with the use of certain new products on the surgical market.Go here to find out about SEPRAFILM and tell your surgeon you want him to consider using this in the procedure. http://www.seprafilm.com/medprof/placing.aspThe best thing to do is not worry. Your hubby can live a healthy life without his colon. But do yourself a favor and ask for an in depth visual critique on why they are removing the entire colon for polops.Good health to you.g.t.
    garbovatwin 21 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi if you do decide to have it, I am 34 and had my entire colon removed in May so I can give you advice on what it is like living without one, I was very sick before my op & it does have its problems but Id choose living like this anyday from what I was like before:confused:
    crunchiejoe 61 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi there, sorry today/nite ive bn sharing what little information i have on different problems.....so bare with me, as far as i am aware removal of partial colon should not have any lasting problems that i know off. Why i say this i know of two people who have had colonostomys (sorry spelling ?) which is the removal of the bowel & bringing stoma through to the abdomin, therefore they now use a colostomy bag (sorry spelling again) anyway, my point is that removal of part of the bowel should be much easier to cope with than this, actually now that i think of it my friends father had this procedure done & he coped with it very well. There might be small differences but compared to a colonostomy bag I think this procedure should be easier to cope with. I hope u can make sense of this & that it helps a little. Best wishes :) Sorry about spelling but im sure u will get the point.:D Hello! I am 41 years old and two years ago, I had my ascending colon removed due to cecal bascule. my ascending colon folded 2x in one week causing excruciating pain. my appendix was actually by my stomach and caught there. They decided that this was not the way to live and took the ascending colon by laproscopy. I actually did have to have a 2 inch incision where they reattached the small bowel. Recovery was not fun, but for two years, I had zero constipation. Yes, my stools were often runny or very sudden, but I'll take that any day over being "backed up"! I also had a friend who kept calling me "Semicolon". I'm always a good sport about stuff like that, so it just made me laugh. Unfortunately, i have run into some issues lately. About 3 months ago, I began to get crampy abdominal pains and severe constipation. They have run every possible test on me and can only conclude that I have IBS. Adhesions from the surgery could also be the problem. I've tried cutting out different foods, but there is no change. I'm always very swollen, and now I have to take Miralax daily to keep things moving, sometimes two of them. It's so frustrating for things to be going SO WELL, and then this! I'm having another CT scan next week to see what the problem is. I will have my bowels emptied before the test this time so they don't come back with the report, "You're constipated." Well DUH! It could be something totally unrelated. Not sure. If anything weird can happen, it will happen to me. That's my law. lol
    wndrmom 1 Replies Flag this Response
  • When I had my entire colon removed, my bloating and pain disappeared, I woke with my old washboard stomach I hadnt seen for 4 years, my colon weighed a stone when it should weigh a few pounds. You have to drink 8-12 cups of fluid a day at least as without the colon you need it to hydrate yourself. I have diahorrea alot but I do know of people who have their colon out and are still constipated. Scarey. I have about 8 bowel movements a day. I was so ill I had to have the op I had no choice but its the best thing that happened to me. Before I had no life at all, I couldnt work & was bedridden alot, im now 10 wks on, I still have other issues but I have got rid of the back pain, sickness and bloating. My daughter is slowly getting her mum back. If living with your colon is affecting your life badly, it can only get better. I even have some incontience but Id still have this than what I had before, and at 34 thats quite a statement. My surgeon joined my small intestine to my anus but it doesnt work for everyone
    crunchiejoe 61 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hello! I am 41 years old and two years ago, I had my ascending colon removed due to cecal bascule. my ascending colon folded 2x in one week causing excruciating pain. my appendix was actually by my stomach and caught there. They decided that this was not the way to live and took the ascending colon by laproscopy. I actually did have to have a 2 inch incision where they reattached the small bowel. Recovery was not fun, but for two years, I had zero constipation. Yes, my stools were often runny or very sudden, but I'll take that any day over being "backed up"! I also had a friend who kept calling me "Semicolon". I'm always a good sport about stuff like that, so it just made me laugh. Unfortunately, i have run into some issues lately. About 3 months ago, I began to get crampy abdominal pains and severe constipation. They have run every possible test on me and can only conclude that I have IBS. Adhesions from the surgery could also be the problem. I've tried cutting out different foods, but there is no change. I'm always very swollen, and now I have to take Miralax daily to keep things moving, sometimes two of them. It's so frustrating for things to be going SO WELL, and then this! I'm having another CT scan next week to see what the problem is. I will have my bowels emptied before the test this time so they don't come back with the report, "You're constipated." Well DUH! It could be something totally unrelated. Not sure. If anything weird can happen, it will happen to me. That's my law. lolMy surgery was about 15 years ago when I was 38. I was in the hospital for 9 days. I was home for one week, 7 days exactly and all was well until that day...I felt a gripping pain in my upper left side under the rib cage and the bowel movements stopped..... and since that day, I've had problems with swelling, pain, pressure, and I am having to take meds to have a bowel movement. I've been to the doctor and get no help.....some doctors have been down right rude to me because I don't let it go and continue to search for help. I think I may have scar tissue wrapped around a section of small bowel or maybe something has twisted, but I'm not a doctor, so I'm just second guessing. I feel sorry for anyone who has this problem.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 3, 2009
    • 09:06 PM
    • 0
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  • My surgery was about 15 years ago when I was 38. I was in the hospital for 9 days. I was home for one week, 7 days exactly and all was well until that day...I felt a gripping pain in my upper left side under the rib cage and the bowel movements stopped..... and since that day, I've had problems with swelling, pain, pressure, and I am having to take meds to have a bowel movement. I've been to the doctor and get no help.....some doctors have been down right rude to me because I don't let it go and continue to search for help. I think I may have scar tissue wrapped around a section of small bowel or maybe something has twisted, but I'm not a doctor, so I'm just second guessing. I feel sorry for anyone who has this problem. My story is a long hideous one, its on my personal web page at www.kerrymaidmentinfo.co.uk. I have my entire colon removed in May 2009 & I am now in recovery, and it is pretty hard but beats having constipation anyday. im 35 and am now partially incontient but id rather have that than be poisoned by my colon like before. My surgeon has told me that if you havent had a total colectomy like I have then constipation can come back when part of the colon is removed, I was only meant to have my left colon removed but as mine was so badly damaged they took it all. I was diagnosed eventually with a condition called obstructive defecation syndrome. Poor you, I also feel for anyone in this position, doctors are pretty useless on this subject. x
    crunchiejoe 61 Replies
    • September 4, 2009
    • 00:00 PM
    • 0
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