Discussions By Condition: Brain conditions

severe stroke,now a vegetable,night sweats

Posted In: Brain conditions 3 Replies
  • Posted By: destiny234
  • November 13, 2007
  • 11:38 AM

My mother had a stroke about 4 yrs ago, it was very severe leaving her now a virtual vegetable. She doesnt walk,talk,eat, she is incontinent. My dad prefers to look after her at home. It may seem trivial to say she has night sweats but it is wearing my dad down getting up several times through the night to change her as she is soaking wet. I cant help him as i live 400 miles away. He is 71 and although is fairly fit for his age he is not getting quality sleep. There has been blood tests done on my mother and various drugs she is on have been evaluated/altered in case it was the cause, all to no avail. They seem to have given up now. Can anyone help?

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  • You should look into Acunpuncture. I know a person who took his mother for Acupuncture treatment after a stroke paralized her entire left side.Now the lady can walk, and do everything like a normal person, except she can't raise the arm higher than elbow level yet. It took her 4 years of regular treatment to become totally independent but obviously they saw results after several treatments, hence she continued taking it.I suspect that the lack of mobility is weakening your mom's organs- if she can't move, her energy flow deminishes and she can catch infections easily.Even if she does not recover total mobility, acupuncture and acupressure can help her stimulate digestive and immune system health :).One can learn acupressure and administer it at home as needed. Pressure w/o needles is safe and easy. You can buy a book/manual on acupressure or reflexology...and use a chart to learn the points.My Mother in Law is getting daily treatment...she was due for a horrific knee replacement, and now she is walking and having less difficulties breathing. No operations! She actually disposed her pain killers and steroids. She used to be bed bounded too.Find a good person, someone certified and with great references.I wish the best to your Family.Sincerely,Fruity.
    Eatafruit78 960 Replies
    • November 13, 2007
    • 04:56 PM
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  • You should look into Acunpuncture. I know a person who took his mother for Acupuncture treatment after a stroke paralized her entire left side.Now the lady can walk, and do everything like a normal person, except she can't raise the arm higher than elbow level yet. It took her 4 years of regular treatment to become totally independent but obviously they saw results after several treatments, hence she continued taking it.I suspect that the lack of mobility is weakening your mom's organs- if she can't move, her energy flow deminishes and she can catch infections easily.Even if she does not recover total mobility, acupuncture and acupressure can help her stimulate digestive and immune system health :).One can learn acupressure and administer it at home as needed. Pressure w/o needles is safe and easy. You can buy a book/manual on acupressure or reflexology...and use a chart to learn the points.My Mother in Law is getting daily treatment...she was due for a horrific knee replacement, and now she is walking and having less difficulties breathing. No operations! She actually disposed her pain killers and steroids. She used to be bed bounded too. Find a good person, someone certified and with great references. I wish the best to your Family.Sincerely,Fruity. Acupuncture is MOST effective immediately after a stroke, but it can still make a difference if it has been 4 years. I highly recommend this and have seen amazing stories. With that said, it sounds like it would be difficult to do. Some Oriental docs will make house calls ( I do in special circumstances_), so it is worth asking about in my opinion. My best advice concerning her meds is to look them up yourself on www.drugs.com. Doctors "evaluating" her drugs is usually not very thorough, and drugs.com may come up with an interaction that could cause her severe night sweats. Best wishesDOM
    acuann 3080 Replies
    • November 13, 2007
    • 08:22 PM
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  • I was just reading an article the other day about sweating in primary care patients the other day. This was the conclusion:Night sweats, day sweats, and hot flashes are common symptoms in elderly primary care patients. Presumably related to autonomic reactions to emotional or physical distress, they are, no doubt, more noticeable and distressing to some than to others. Though relatively nonspecific, their presence should probably prompt additional questions about febrile illnesses, diabetes, anxiety, depression, somatic and visceral pain, sensory deficits, and restless legs syndrome in addition to standard, recommended evaluations for uncommon serious diseases, such as tuberculosis and malignancies. You can read the whole study here:http://www.annfammed.org/cgi/content/full/2/5/391 Hope this helps...Kiera
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2007
    • 09:26 PM
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