Discussions By Condition: Blood conditions

Low Everything... Dr not sure what to do

Posted In: Blood conditions 9 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 20, 2009
  • 04:18 AM

After reporting fatigue, bruising, shortness of breath, etc to my doctor, he did a CBC which came back as follows:

WBC 3.3
RBC 3.77
HGB 7.0
Platelets 98

He seems to think it's nothing more than a "severe iron deficiency" and has put me on Tandem Plus vitamin supplements for six weeks before retesting. Several family friends who have personal experience with leukemia and similar disorders have questioned his diagnosis and think I should demand a referral to a Hematologist/Oncologist immediately. I was also told that a hemoglobin level of 7.0 is "at infusion level" and that something like that likely won't improve with simple vitamin use. It seems all four of the numbers are low - I've had issues with iron-deficiency since I hit puberty (heavy menses from the get-go), but never this low, and the other numbers have never been low as well.

Has anyone else dealt with something similar that may be able to provide a little insight? I'm dealing with a small-town doctor who doesn't have a lot of experience with things outside of the "norm" for family practice providers, but I've had trouble finding information online that can shed some light on this situation for me, and I feel uncomfortable questioning his "expertise" without a sound reason. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks.

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9 Replies:

  • Just how heavy is your period that you would be getting an Iron deficiency from it? Usually that occurs when women have fibroids and have extremely heavy bleeding due to them. If you are going through a pad every hour or two, you should request have a sonogram done.Anemia can be caused by infections of many kinds. Parasites in the GI tract, Bacterial infections, etc. Vitamin therapy is one bandaid for your anemia but the direct cause of it should be found.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 31, 2009
    • 01:21 AM
    • 0
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  • After reporting fatigue, bruising, shortness of breath, etc to my doctor, he did a CBC which came back as follows: WBC 3.3RBC 3.77HGB 7.0Platelets 98 He seems to think it's nothing more than a "severe iron deficiency" and has put me on Tandem Plus vitamin supplements for six weeks before retesting. Several family friends who have personal experience with leukemia and similar disorders have questioned his diagnosis and think I should demand a referral to a Hematologist/Oncologist immediately. I was also told that a hemoglobin level of 7.0 is "at infusion level" and that something like that likely won't improve with simple vitamin use. It seems all four of the numbers are low - I've had issues with iron-deficiency since I hit puberty (heavy menses from the get-go), but never this low, and the other numbers have never been low as well. Has anyone else dealt with something similar that may be able to provide a little insight? I'm dealing with a small-town doctor who doesn't have a lot of experience with things outside of the "norm" for family practice providers, but I've had trouble finding information online that can shed some light on this situation for me, and I feel uncomfortable questioning his "expertise" without a sound reason. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks.I don't know numbers but, my low iron was caused by low b6. You can't use the iron without it. It took alot of dr's to figure that out. Iron vits did not help.I now take b complex , and iron is normal.
    JEANER 2 Replies
    • February 9, 2010
    • 01:26 AM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • hi, i had something the same. all my blood count was slow. im 21 now but when i was 12 i had heavy nose bleeds and bruising. the doctors didnt no what was wrong. ive been through lots of tests,they thought i hade laukemia. it was all the symptoms. i live in ireland and i had to travel to england to see if the doctors knew over there. it took them a few years but in the end it was a rare blood condition called Gauchers Disease. im the only one in northern ireland with the condition. I think you should ask your doctor to test you for it.Theres no harm in tryin:)xx
    steeny keenan 1 Replies
    • February 10, 2010
    • 03:08 PM
    • 0
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  • Hi there. I've known anaemia for too long...I suffered from mainly easy bruising, heavy nosebleeds, mouth bleeds & heavy menstrual bleeds lasting 4 months growing up. It caused severe anaemia and I had an infusion once a week for 8 months until I was diagnosed with a bleeding disorder. If you are fragile when it comes to bleeding, get tested for a bleeding disorder. They can treat bleeds with infusions and give you iron infusions too. If a bleeding disorder is not the case, look into uterine disorders.If you do not have heavy menstrual bleeding I would look into vitamin b's, c & folate deficiency, and any disorders of your digestive system.Iron is really important, mine was so low I couldn't walk and developed leukocytosis which was attacking my own body and making me weaker & harder to function. With low iron and extremely low levels of oxygen being carried around the body, you permanently damage organs or experience full organ failure. My specialist provided me with some explanations as to why these didn't work for me:Oral iron supplements (3/4 of a year to absorb and 2% as effective as infusions)Iron injections (80-90% sits in the fat of your skin an doesnt go directly into the veins)Infusions were a success for me, and I had 15 times more iron from one 775ml infusion (most are 100-375ml). Dont settle for tablets and weekly injections (iron shots usually leave scars), most women with bleeding disorders only need one infusion a year and non-bleeders once in 5 years, 1-3 hrs with a tube in your arm is well worth it the results. :)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • After reporting fatigue, bruising, shortness of breath, etc to my doctor, he did a CBC which came back as follows:WBC 3.3RBC 3.77HGB 7.0Platelets 98He seems to think it's nothing more than a "severe iron deficiency" and has put me on Tandem Plus vitamin supplements for six weeks before retesting. Several family friends who have personal experience with leukemia and similar disorders have questioned his diagnosis and think I should demand a referral to a Hematologist/Oncologist immediately. I was also told that a hemoglobin level of 7.0 is "at infusion level" and that something like that likely won't improve with simple vitamin use. It seems all four of the numbers are low - I've had issues with iron-deficiency since I hit puberty (heavy menses from the get-go), but never this low, and the other numbers have never been low as well. Has anyone else dealt with something similar that may be able to provide a little insight? I'm dealing with a small-town doctor who doesn't have a lot of experience with things outside of the "norm" for family practice providers, but I've had trouble finding information online that can shed some light on this situation for me, and I feel uncomfortable questioning his "expertise" without a sound reason. Any info would be greatly appreciated.Many thanks.A lot of iron-deficient patients grow pica, an abnormal craving for precise foods (ice cubes, lettuce, etc.) oft-times not rich in iron- physician jobsCauses and hazard Factors of IDIron deficiency has effected on about 11% of pre-menopausal women, less than 1.9% of men and 5.9% of post-menopausal women.Older folk who become lacking do so not because they consume too petite iron but because of chronic inner bleeding frequently caused by blain, polyps, or tumors. Three sets of people confront an increased hazard of iron deficiency, even without inner bleeding.These are: People who have gone their teeth. Those people should get a multi-vitamin and mineral subsidiary containing iron if they have lurch eating a balanced meal. Women who menstruate excessive. Some of those women could also necessitate supplements to restore iron - but they should first confirm that menstruation is the one and only cause of their anemia. Other pre-menopausal women can simply get sufficient iron by eating a moderate sum of meat. Even real vegetarians can get every part of the iron they need by including virtual iron-rich plant foodstuffs in their meal, such as green leafy vegetables, legumes and fortified breads and cereal foods. Pregnant women. They should consume a daily supplement including iron to provide the spare iron wanted to nourish the developing womb.
    Jeshilka 3 Replies Flag this Response
  • After reporting fatigue, bruising, shortness of breath, etc to my doctor, he did a CBC which came back as follows:WBC 3.3RBC 3.77HGB 7.0Platelets 98He seems to think it's nothing more than a "severe iron deficiency" and has put me on Tandem Plus vitamin supplements for six weeks before retesting. Several family friends who have personal experience with leukemia and similar disorders have questioned his diagnosis and think I should demand a referral to a Hematologist/Oncologist immediately. I was also told that a hemoglobin level of 7.0 is "at infusion level" and that something like that likely won't improve with simple vitamin use. It seems all four of the numbers are low - I've had issues with iron-deficiency since I hit puberty (heavy menses from the get-go), but never this low, and the other numbers have never been low as well. Has anyone else dealt with something similar that may be able to provide a little insight? I'm dealing with a small-town doctor who doesn't have a lot of experience with things outside of the "norm" for family practice providers, but I've had trouble finding information online that can shed some light on this situation for me, and I feel uncomfortable questioning his "expertise" without a sound reason. Any info would be greatly appreciated.Many thanks.A lot of iron-deficient patients grow pica, an abnormal craving for precise foods (ice cubes, lettuce, etc.) oft-times not rich in iron- physician jobsCauses and hazard Factors of IDIron deficiency has effected on about 11% of pre-menopausal women, less than 1.9% of men and 5.9% of post-menopausal women.Older folk who become lacking do so not because they consume too petite iron but because of chronic inner bleeding frequently caused by blain, polyps, or tumors. Three sets of people confront an increased hazard of iron deficiency, even without inner bleeding.These are: People who have gone their teeth. Those people should get a multi-vitamin and mineral subsidiary containing iron if they have lurch eating a balanced meal. Women who menstruate excessive. Some of those women could also necessitate supplements to restore iron - but they should first confirm that menstruation is the one and only cause of their anemia. Other pre-menopausal women can simply get sufficient iron by eating a moderate sum of meat. Even real vegetarians can get every part of the iron they need by including virtual iron-rich plant foodstuffs in their meal, such as green leafy vegetables, legumes and fortified breads and cereal foods. Pregnant women. They should consume a daily supplement including iron to provide the spare iron wanted to nourish the developing womb.
    Jeshilka 3 Replies Flag this Response
  • After reporting fatigue, bruising, shortness of breath, etc to my doctor, he did a CBC which came back as follows:WBC 3.3RBC 3.77HGB 7.0Platelets 98He seems to think it's nothing more than a "severe iron deficiency" and has put me on Tandem Plus vitamin supplements for six weeks before retesting. Several family friends who have personal experience with leukemia and similar disorders have questioned his diagnosis and think I should demand a referral to a Hematologist/Oncologist immediately. I was also told that a hemoglobin level of 7.0 is "at infusion level" and that something like that likely won't improve with simple vitamin use. It seems all four of the numbers are low - I've had issues with iron-deficiency since I hit puberty (heavy menses from the get-go), but never this low, and the other numbers have never been low as well. Has anyone else dealt with something similar that may be able to provide a little insight? I'm dealing with a small-town doctor who doesn't have a lot of experience with things outside of the "norm" for family practice providers, but I've had trouble finding information online that can shed some light on this situation for me, and I feel uncomfortable questioning his "expertise" without a sound reason. Any info would be greatly appreciated.Many thanks. A lot of iron-deficient patients grow pica, an abnormal craving for precise foods (ice cubes, lettuce, etc.) oft-times not rich in iron- physician jobs Causes and hazard Factors of IDIron deficiency has effected on about 11% of pre-menopausal women, less than 1.9% of men and 5.9% of post-menopausal women.Older folk who become lacking do so not because they consume too petite iron but because of chronic inner bleeding frequently caused by blain, polyps, or tumors. Three sets of people confront an increased hazard of iron deficiency, even without inner bleeding.These are: People who have gone their teeth. Those people should get a multi-vitamin and mineral subsidiary containing iron if they have lurch eating a balanced meal. Women who menstruate excessive. Some of those women could also necessitate supplements to restore iron - but they should first confirm that menstruation is the one and only cause of their anemia. Other pre-menopausal women can simply get sufficient iron by eating a moderate sum of meat. Even real vegetarians can get every part of the iron they need by including virtual iron-rich plant foodstuffs in their meal, such as green leafy vegetables, legumes and fortified breads and cereal foods. Pregnant women. They should consume a daily supplement including iron to provide the spare iron wanted to nourish the developing womb.
    Jeshilka 3 Replies Flag this Response
  • If you have such heavy problem at the time of menses, it will be better to consult any gynecologist first. One of my sisters had such problem when she was just twenty one years old and she used to look faint or you can say fairer than usual when she had menses. It was not only due to iron deficiency but doctor told that it sometimes happen that blood stops its function of clotting and it flows at such times which ultimately collapses the patient. It is not a common problem but in some rare cases it happens. It will be better to consult a gynecologist in any city near by.
    uioprt 6 Replies Flag this Response
  • If you have such heavy problem at the time of menses, it will be better to consult any gynecologist first and check your pulse. One of my sisters had such problem when she was just twenty one years old and she used to look faint or you can say fairer than usual when she had menses. It was not only due to iron deficiency but doctor told that it sometimes happen that blood stops its function of clotting and it flows at such times which ultimately collapses the patient. It is not a common problem but in some rare cases it happens. It will be better to consult a gynecologist in any city near by. If you have such heavy problem at the time of menses, it will be better to consult any gynecologist first. One of my sisters had such problem when she was just twenty one years old and she used to look faint or you can say fairer than usual when she had menses. It was not only due to iron deficiency but doctor told that it sometimes happen that blood stops its function of clotting and it flows at such times which ultimately collapses the patient. It is not a common problem but in some rare cases it happens. It will be better to consult a gynecologist in any city near by.
    uioprt 6 Replies Flag this Response
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