Discussions By Condition: Blood conditions

High homocysteine

Posted In: Blood conditions 5 Replies
  • Posted By: quelling
  • March 17, 2011
  • 07:24 PM

Hello,

My blood has been tested on homocysteine, it was 45,4 micromol/l.
Is this exceptionally high for hyperhomocysteinemia?

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5 Replies:

  • It's because I read that dietary changes can lower it up to 60%, which would be still way too high.And I read that it's dangerous if highly elevated, but I don't actually know how high 45,4 micromol/l is.
    quelling 7 Replies Flag this Response
  • I just want an impression of how bad this is for someone at the age of 22, and how much the problem can be solved.
    quelling 7 Replies Flag this Response
  • I just want an impression of how bad this is for someone at the age of 22, and how much the problem can be solved.This is extremely bad and perfectly curable. Check www.lef.org (type homocysteine into their search window) for detailed articles on the dangers of high homocysteine and how to get it in hand. One of the owners of this foundation has genetic hyperhomocysteine issues and thus it is a hot topic with this group, which says that homocysteine should be 6.3 and that for every 3 points higher you have a 35% higher risk of a cardiovascular event. Be sure to also check the search string "stubborn high homocysteine" for further tips on how to bring it down if the set of basic nutrients does not achieve the desired effect. Basically you are deficient in B vitamins and it has broken your 1-carbon metabolism (the methyl biochemical pathway). Your diet may contain insufficient B vitamins (which is almost certain if you eat fast food starches rather than stone ground whole wheat breads and noodles), or other nutritional deficiencies which prevent absorption and adequate utilization of these nutrients, or your stomach may lack acidity or intrinsic factor necessary for absorption of vitamin B12, or you may have one or more genetic defects resulting in defects in the enzymes required to break down these vitamins to active forms. You can get past these problems by taking active B vitamins, which bypass the enzymes necessary to convert B vitamins to their active forms. One such supplement is Thorne Basic B which you can purchase at www.iherb.com. Also needed is sublinguals for active N12 to ensure absorption. The products we, at the B12 Deficiency topic herein, recommend for that are Jarrow methylcobalamin and Country Life Dibencozide (which is adenosylcobalamin). These are the active forms of B12 and these supplements take longer to dissolve which translates to more sublingual absorption (necessary since absorption via the digestive tract is only 1% in the absence of sufficient stomach acid or intrinsic factor). Any protocol to lower homocysteine should include betaine (TMG), which acts as a stopcock preventing homocysteine buildup after a methionine containing meal. Many people cannot lower their homocysteine levels without it. If you eat the recommended 7-9 fruits and vegetables a day for health you may not need to supplement betaine. You should go to the B12 Deficiency topic for the support supplements suggested since you will be opening up currently nonfunctional biochemical pathways and this may suddenly increase your need for potassium, for instance. Homocysteine is ultimately cleared via the kidney so kidney problems can raise this value. www.lef.org recommends a much more sensitive test for kidney function called C statin, which they offer. Through this test and some sleuthing you can determine if some medication you are taking, including OTC drugs, may be harming your kidneys. Anecdotally, I met someone who said her college age daughter was on dialysis and her doctor said it was caused by drinking too much pop. If you cannot bring down your homocysteine via a combination of active folic acid (methylfolate), active B12 (methylfolate), active B6 (P5P), and TMG, in conjunction with (or delivered via) a B complex (because small amounts of B2 are required), then you need to do some detective work into the state of your kidneys. best of luckMad
    madanthony 1087 Replies Flag this Response
  • This is extremely bad and perfectly curable. Check www.lef.org (type homocysteine into their search window) for detailed articles on the dangers of high homocysteine and how to get it in hand. One of the owners of this foundation has genetic hyperhomocysteine issues and thus it is a hot topic with this group, which says that homocysteine should be 6.3 and that for every 3 points higher you have a 35% higher risk of a cardiovascular event. Be sure to also check the search string "stubborn high homocysteine" for further tips on how to bring it down if the set of basic nutrients does not achieve the desired effect. Basically you are deficient in B vitamins and it has broken your 1-carbon metabolism (the methyl biochemical pathway). Your diet may contain insufficient B vitamins (which is almost certain if you eat fast food starches rather than stone ground whole wheat breads and noodles), or other nutritional deficiencies which prevent absorption and adequate utilization of these nutrients, or your stomach may lack acidity or intrinsic factor necessary for absorption of vitamin B12, or you may have one or more genetic defects resulting in defects in the enzymes required to break down these vitamins to active forms. You can get past these problems by taking active B vitamins, which bypass the enzymes necessary to convert B vitamins to their active forms. One such supplement is Thorne Basic B which you can purchase at www.iherb.com. Also needed is sublinguals for active N12 to ensure absorption. The products we, at the B12 Deficiency topic herein, recommend for that are Jarrow methylcobalamin and Country Life Dibencozide (which is adenosylcobalamin). These are the active forms of B12 and these supplements take longer to dissolve which translates to more sublingual absorption (necessary since absorption via the digestive tract is only 1% in the absence of sufficient stomach acid or intrinsic factor). Any protocol to lower homocysteine should include betaine (TMG), which acts as a stopcock preventing homocysteine buildup after a methionine containing meal. Many people cannot lower their homocysteine levels without it. If you eat the recommended 7-9 fruits and vegetables a day for health you may not need to supplement betaine. You should go to the B12 Deficiency topic for the support supplements suggested since you will be opening up currently nonfunctional biochemical pathways and this may suddenly increase your need for potassium, for instance. Homocysteine is ultimately cleared via the kidney so kidney problems can raise this value. www.lef.org recommends a much more sensitive test for kidney function called C statin, which they offer. Through this test and some sleuthing you can determine if some medication you are taking, including OTC drugs, may be harming your kidneys. Anecdotally, I met someone who said her college age daughter was on dialysis and her doctor said it was caused by drinking too much pop. If you cannot bring down your homocysteine via a combination of active folic acid (methylfolate), active B12 (methylfolate), active B6 (P5P), and TMG, in conjunction with (or delivered via) a B complex (because small amounts of B2 are required), then you need to do some detective work into the state of your kidneys. best of luckMadOops, I meant B12 above, not N12. The sensitive test for kidney function is actually called: Cystatin-CCheck here on desired homocysteine levels: http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2001/june2001_report_homocysteine.htmlhttp://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2006/oct2006_cover_homocysteine_01.htmhttp://www.lef.org/Vitamins-Supplements/ItemLC121251/Cystatin-C-Blood-Test.htmlhttp://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2009/aug2009_Is-Homocysteine-Making-You-Sick_01.htmhttp://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2004/may2004_report_blood_03.htm
    madanthony 1087 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thank you very much for all this information.I got stomach problems like indigestion, gastritis, IBS and GERD, but there's also recently been developing some mild psoriasis on my skin.I read that can be a cause too, if so does this exclude vitamin B deficiency? (other cause?)Also I fail at finding anything of information on how the treatment will be when psoriasis caused that elevated homocysteine in my blood. (same?)I think 45,4 is extremely high for my age, so could it be both? :confused:
    quelling 7 Replies Flag this Response
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