Discussions By Condition: Back conditions

Loss Of Lumbar Lordosis

Posted In: Back conditions 15 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • February 1, 2007
  • 07:17 PM

I've had severe lower back pain for the last 2 years. I was in a car accident a few months AFTER the pain started, but the accident left me with NECK and SHOULDER pain on TOP of the back pain. My family doctor refered me to a gynocolgist and neurologist, and they all made me feel like I was drug seeking or faking for attention. It got progressivly worse, to the point I can no longer carry my daughter, or stand/walk for more than about 5 minutes without being in serious pain. Oh, and my back is as stiff as a board.

I finally went to a new doctor who ordered x-rays right away. The x-rays show loss of lumbar lordosis- my lumbar spine is completely straight and he said it looked like it was starting to bend out backwards. Doctor said he'd never seen that happen. He said it could be caused by muscle spasm, but would that really cause my spine to bend the wrong way? He put me on Tramadol for the pain, and Flexeril for the stiffness.

I was wondering if anybody else had heard of this, and if so, how were you treated? Surgery? Physical Therapy?

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15 Replies:

  • hey, I know you posted this a long time ago, but my fiance is in the military and he just had x-rays done and he has loss of lumbar lordosis, or a completely straight spine. He's in Iraq right now, but may have to be sent home. I'm sorry that we dont have any idea or fix for this yet but I can keep you posted feel free to email me at tiffanyv03 at gmail.com.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 11, 2007
    • 07:03 AM
    • 0
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  • Yes, I have seen this, and the loss of lumbar lordosis definitely can be caused by muscle spasms. The muscles splint in an attempt to stop motion of the back, due to the pain. Surgery is not the answer. PT may help some, but so may chiropractic. First you have to stop the spasms with some effictive means. Then the back can be adjusted as neccessary to re align it. I hope you feel better soon.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2007
    • 04:25 AM
    • 0
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  • I tend to agree with with nrvs but be careful when you choose a chiro or physical therapist some people have a really good response to manipulation or mobilization or other types of therapy to improve this condition where as others can get worse do you know someone with good judgement who can recommend someone.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 13, 2007
    • 10:56 AM
    • 0
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  • Am yogeswaran ,23 yrs old. Am suffering from severe back pain for past 3 months. Sometimes the pain routes to my legs through buttocks. I cant bend my back or sit firmly in ground.The X-Ray reports that " Loss of lumbar lordsis " - " Partial lumbarisation of S1 vertebrea" - " Spina bifida of S1 vertebrea ".Please suggest me what problem am i suffering from?Do this problem can be resolved, if yes how long it takes?What steps I need to take up to resolve it?Please help me out.Do reply me in " yogeswaranshanmugam@gmail.com "Awaiting for your reply.With regards,Yogeswaran S+91 9884488466
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • November 15, 2007
    • 11:36 AM
    • 0
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  • I have a congenital loss of lordosis. In my family, it is odd to NOT have your lumbar spine fused by age 25. So after suffering for 9 years, at a disabling, severe level for the last 3 years, I finally gave in and had L4-S1 fused, creating a lordatic curve to relieve stress on the upper lumbar discs. Unfortunately, I'm still in A LOT of pain. We're beginning to wonder if the trauma has triggered RA or lupus, both of which run in my mother's side. Things I've learned from this ordeal:1. Be insistent. You know your body better than your doctor. Yes, it takes some healing time, but sometimes it just feels like something is off. And that needs to be investigated. My lordotis resulted in two ruptured discs that were missed by two radiologists and finally caught by a neurosurgeon--all looking at the same MRI images.2. Better living by chemistry. Thanks to the makers of Neurontin, Lyrica, Skelaxin, Flexeril, Zanaflex, Cymbalta, Percocet, Vicadin, Lortab, OxyContin, Opana, and Fentanyl, at different times, my life has been quasi-functional. "A pain patient takes pills to participate in life. An addict takes pills to escape life."3. Exercise. Walking helps get the blood flowing and cleanses acids that build up during spasms. Yoga/Pilates are *GREAT* for stretching--keeping your hamstrings loose will prevent painful hip rotation. And working with a physical therapist can help you identify particular exercises to work on spasming muscles and help you out of painful spasms by massaging trigger points.4. Watch your diet. Extra weight increases lumbar pain. Plus, when you're in a lot of pain, you don't move much. As a result, it is easy to pack on the pounds in a downward spiral. The easiest mechanism to control your weight is to manage portion size. Just before my fusion surgery when I could not hardly walk to the bathroom, I ate 5-8 times a day in small portions that could be eaten laying down. For example, a Cheerio's bar at 7AM, pre-prepared strawberries around 10AM, hummus and toasted pita at 12PM, baby carrots at 3PM, cut canteloupe at 5:30PM, baked Tyson Chicken Strips with potato wedges/brocolli/brussel sprouts (an easy finger-food veggie) at 7:00PM, and then one-two more fruit or veggie snacks depending on how I was feeling.5. Realize that you are affecting others. Face it, you are going to have to depend on others more than you like. Good friends will ask what else they can do; others will distance themselves. There are times my husband and especially my dad get really upset that they can't just make me better. For as much pain as you experience, all those closest to you are also hurting. And it is hard to sympathethize since they're not physically in pain, right? But mental state affects everything. So do what you can to support everyone else who helps you.6. Be educated about your condition and complications of any procedures. Knowledge is power. I would not wish this sort of pain on my worst enemy. But one saying that makes me feel a little hopeful is that "without pain, the joy in life won't show." And a safe return to the bridegroom trooper!
    painintheeverywhere 1 Replies
    • February 27, 2008
    • 09:31 PM
    • 0
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  • "I've had severe lower back pain for the last 2 years.... Oh, and my back is as stiff as a board." I suggest you seek a referral to see a Rheumatologist. I think you may ??? very well have Ankylosing Spondylitis. AS is an inflammatory seronegative arthritis of the spine which is a progressive autoimmune disease. Over time it causes erosion and eventual fusion of the sacroiliac joints and spinal vertebrae, slowly working it's way up and pushing the skeleton forward in a hunched position. A 'stiffening' of the spine, chronic pain lasting longer than 3 months duration, fatigue, hip or buttock pain and the loss of lumbar lordosis are very typical signs/symptoms of AS. Onset is usually between the ages of 18-35 and proper treatment may help to slow down or avoid some of the damage. Approx. 90% of those diagnosed with AS are HLA B27 positive but RA negative. The B27 test, however, is not conclusive either way but being + may help to support a clinical diagnosis, and being negative does not rule out AS (or another sister disease in the larger spondyloarthropathy (SpA) family.The disease is more prevalent in males but females are affected also, the male to female ratio being estimated at 3:1 or 2.5:1. Although it is not a rare disease, it is unfortunately often missed or the diagnosis is delayed by 7-11 yrs (particularly in women) since the dx criteria requires xray evidence of a degree of sacroiliac joint damage which often takes a few years before becoming apparent.Please do not let anyone try to tell or convince you that the pain is 'all in your head'..! Until you are able to establish what is really causing your symptoms, I'd strongly advise against Chiropractic care. I am not a doc by any means but have had AS for 28 yrs.My best to you in finding out what is wrong and in getting the appropriate medical care and support.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I have finally found the only treatment and that is an awesome osteopath. He slowly, gradually realligned my back and is helping me to get an exercise routine sorted to strengthen my core muscles. An osteo works with soft tissue as well as manipulating the spine and will not force anything if the body is too tight to release. It takes a long time, something I wasn't expected and as a young, sports mad woman who loves to travel the impact on my lifestyle has been massive. I feel for those that haven't discovered osteopathy as I saw a physio who made me worse and the painkillers had a knock on effect on my stomach and mood. All the best with your recovery, hang in there.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I've had severe lower back pain for the last 2 years. I was in a car accident a few months AFTER the pain started, but the accident left me with NECK and SHOULDER pain on TOP of the back pain. My family doctor refered me to a gynocolgist and neurologist, and they all made me feel like I was drug seeking or faking for attention. It got progressivly worse, to the point I can no longer carry my daughter, or stand/walk for more than about 5 minutes without being in serious pain. Oh, and my back is as stiff as a board. I finally went to a new doctor who ordered x-rays right away. The x-rays show loss of lumbar lordosis- my lumbar spine is completely straight and he said it looked like it was starting to bend out backwards. Doctor said he'd never seen that happen. He said it could be caused by muscle spasm, but would that really cause my spine to bend the wrong way? He put me on Tramadol for the pain, and Flexeril for the stiffness. I was wondering if anybody else had heard of this, and if so, how were you treated? Surgery? Physical Therapy?There is hope for those of us in the world with congenital hypolordosis. First of all let me assure you that you are not alone. In my seventeen years of practice most of my patients with moderate to severe lower back pain tend to have hypolordosis and in many acute cases have concurrent reversal of a normal disc angle or angles. As would seem logical there is only one way to increase a lordotic curve in the lumbar spine through specific posterior to anterior (P to A ) adjustments. When you call a Chiropractic Physician ask them if they adjust the lumbopelvic region in the P to A direction or if they use the million dollar roll which is simply a twisting of the spine and pelvis and hoping for the best. As was stated by another on this site many times people get worse with this twisting. Once you find a Chiropractic Physician that knows how to adjust straight P to A I would also highly recommend that you do the yoga cobra stretch to help to stretch out your tight muscles on a regular basis. Finally may I go out on a limb and suspect that you have a very flat rear end and that you probably come by it genetically. After you have started your specific adjustments and stretching get yourself a belt and hang a 1 to 2 lb. weight (ankle weights will work well) on the belt one hanging over each buttock and walk around the house for 15 minutes 2xs a day and you will almost instantly begin to feel your postural muscles retrain themselves to force you buttocks outward to overcome the weight and thus increase your lumbar curvature in response to the weight. Once you are convinced of the extreme amount of relief that this can bring to your back my I suggest that you contact www.siliconebody.com and call and talk to Sarah (ext. 5) and tell her you would like to order some Gluteus Maximus silicone padded panties to help with your posture and then you will find as I have with my flat lower back that there is indeed a way to retrain these muscles and keep your posture correct all the waking hours of the day. I have had the very problem that we are discussing and hurt my L-4 disc a couple of years ago and until I retrained my postural muscles with the padded silicone briefs I was hurting every day what a relief to actually see my posture change and feel my symptoms disappear unless I lift something very heavy I'm symptom free. Good Luck,Bret Staley DC
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 18, 2009
    • 11:37 PM
    • 0
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  • Hey dis is Dr Rahul R Atigre..by profession i am pure Ayurvedic medicine practioner..Glad to tell u,pain hapenning due to loss of lumbar lordosis can be decreased to 60% in the initial stage and can be cleared by around 7-8 months of treatment..any querries email me at rahulatigre@gmail.com I've had severe lower back pain for the last 2 years. I was in a car accident a few months AFTER the pain started, but the accident left me with NECK and SHOULDER pain on TOP of the back pain. My family doctor refered me to a gynocolgist and neurologist, and they all made me feel like I was drug seeking or faking for attention. It got progressivly worse, to the point I can no longer carry my daughter, or stand/walk for more than about 5 minutes without being in serious pain. Oh, and my back is as stiff as a board. I finally went to a new doctor who ordered x-rays right away. The x-rays show loss of lumbar lordosis- my lumbar spine is completely straight and he said it looked like it was starting to bend out backwards. Doctor said he'd never seen that happen. He said it could be caused by muscle spasm, but would that really cause my spine to bend the wrong way? He put me on Tramadol for the pain, and Flexeril for the stiffness. I was wondering if anybody else had heard of this, and if so, how were you treated? Surgery? Physical Therapy?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hey dis is Dr Rahul R Atigre..by profession i am pure Ayurvedic medicine practioner..glad to tell u,pain hapenning due to loss of lumbar lordosis can be decreased to 60% in the initial stage and can be cleared by around 7-8 months of treatment..any querries email me at rahulatigre@gmail.com I've had severe lower back pain for the last 2 years. I was in a car accident a few months AFTER the pain started, but the accident left me with NECK and SHOULDER pain on TOP of the back pain. My family doctor refered me to a gynocolgist and neurologist, and they all made me feel like I was drug seeking or faking for attention. It got progressivly worse, to the point I can no longer carry my daughter, or stand/walk for more than about 5 minutes without being in serious pain. Oh, and my back is as stiff as a board. I finally went to a new doctor who ordered x-rays right away. The x-rays show loss of lumbar lordosis- my lumbar spine is completely straight and he said it looked like it was starting to bend out backwards. Doctor said he'd never seen that happen. He said it could be caused by muscle spasm, but would that really cause my spine to bend the wrong way? He put me on Tramadol for the pain, and Flexeril for the stiffness. I was wondering if anybody else had heard of this, and if so, how were you treated? Surgery? Physical Therapy?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I am a physical therapist. I have seen this frequently with tight muscles. Try not to be overly concerned with what the x-rays indicate. More so, I would highly recommend seeking help from a physical therapist. The main goal is to help you feel better and medication is only a temporary fix. Also, start applying ice (NO HEAT!) to the painful areas, 10 minutes at a time a few times a day. Watch your posture as how you sit and move can aggravate symptoms. For more information about various back conditions you can visit: http://www.joint-pain-solutions.com/Lower-back-pain.html Good luck.
    JTrempe 101 Replies Flag this Response
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  • I've had severe lower back pain for the last 2 years. I was in a car accident a few months AFTER the pain started, but the accident left me with NECK and SHOULDER pain on TOP of the back pain. My family doctor refered me to a gynocolgist and neurologist, and they all made me feel like I was drug seeking or faking for attention. It got progressivly worse, to the point I can no longer carry my daughter, or stand/walk for more than about 5 minutes without being in serious pain. Oh, and my back is as stiff as a board. I finally went to a new doctor who ordered x-rays right away. The x-rays show loss of lumbar lordosis- my lumbar spine is completely straight and he said it looked like it was starting to bend out backwards. Doctor said he'd never seen that happen. He said it could be caused by muscle spasm, but would that really cause my spine to bend the wrong way? He put me on Tramadol for the pain, and Flexeril for the stiffness. I was wondering if anybody else had heard of this, and if so, how were you treated? Surgery? Physical Therapy?I suffered from debilitating lower back pain years ago and it was suggested I lie on the floor face down and just relax and let my spine drop into it's normal curvature. I haven't had serious backpain for years. The therapy gets more complicated if your pain is more on one side. The whole idea is that poor posture is putting your spine in the wrong configuration. There isn't much to lose by trying it, unless you have trouble getting back up off the floor!!!!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Yes, I have seen this, and the loss of lumbar lordosis definitely can be caused by muscle spasms. The muscles splint in an attempt to stop motion of the back, due to the pain. Surgery is not the answer. PT may help some, but so may chiropractic. First you have to stop the spasms with some effictive means. Then the back can be adjusted as neccessary to re align it. I hope you feel better soon.please help me im suffering the same thing im only 17.... in perfect shape and cant play basketball anymore....how can i stop the spasm and readjust my sine so my lower back will have its normal curve again?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hello- I have had a similar injury. Following a fall down the stairs- an xray revealed "straightening of the lumbar spine with loss of lumbar lordosis". I also had a fractured coccyx. The diagnosis was frustrating- it's very painful but not something a Dr will continually prescribe pain medication for. I found myself falling into a depression- I couldn't walk more than 5 minutes, sit more than a half hour- I was miserable. It's now 2 years later. I still have daily pain. I did go through PT. I tried everything. The ONLY thing that brings relief is a Massage Therapist. You need to book with a Sports Massage place, they specialize in deep tissue. The massage isn't relaxing, but afterwards I am pain-free for at least a week! I wasn't even getting relief with oxycodone, Soma, etc. I can live a somewhat normal lifestyle. My next big project is going to be lifting small weights for back strength. Once your Dr. gives you the go-ahead- it's important to rebuild your muscles. After an injury- our back strength is wasted on muscular spasms and readjustment of spine. Good luck- there is hope!
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Thank you Painintheeverywhere (i am sorry that that is your handle),I am newly (2 weeks) leveled by my back issues and your post was very inspiring. I am so sorry that you situation is so dire. but again thank you for your words. I have a friend that is in far more chronic pain than I, so far,and I plan on passing on your wisdom.I hope for a quick recover or at least easy management of your pain. Thank youBig Mummah
    Big Mummah 1 Replies Flag this Response
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