Discussions By Condition: Arthritis

seronegative rheuatoid arthritis

Posted In: Arthritis 11 Replies
  • Posted By: emma87
  • October 5, 2006
  • 08:58 AM

Hi, I'm in the process of being diagnosed. Apparently I have all the physical symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis but not the blood tests to go with it. I'm at university at the moment and find it really difficult to sit down for so long in my two hour lectures, it usually starts hurting my hips and back after about half an hour. Does anyone know anything i can sit on or something to stop this pain?
Emma

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11 Replies:

  • I have seronegative RA and it took over a year to be diagnosed with RA because I was seronegativeYou have it and all that goes with it negative or positiveIn fact in reading groups in Yahoo I have met more negative then positive with RAGood Luck
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 16, 2006
    • 10:22 PM
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  • i also have all the symptoms of arthritis, but i havent been diagnosed. i cant sit for a long time so i try to move my legs around a bit and try to shift in my seat. i know how this feels. its awful.
    yourmom 1 Replies
    • October 28, 2006
    • 02:57 AM
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  • Hi Emma, You probably just need to explain your situation to your professor and explain that you need to sit at the back of the class or close to a door so that you can stand up and stretch your legs from time to time. I am at university right now too, and I know the inactivity stiffens your joints to the point that you are dancing in your seat and can barely stand up when class is over. If you don't want to try the standing up thing, sit in a front row seat so that you have room to outstretch your legs and do a few small physically excercise to keep your joints limber. I have found that no matter what you sit on, it is going to hurt when you sit in the same position for a long period of time. Hi, I'm in the process of being diagnosed. Apparently I have all the physical symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis but not the blood tests to go with it. I'm at university at the moment and find it really difficult to sit down for so long in my two hour lectures, it usually starts hurting my hips and back after about half an hour. Does anyone know anything i can sit on or something to stop this pain? Emma
    jenn38018 7 Replies
    • October 28, 2006
    • 07:28 AM
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  • Emma would agree with all above - really only way to cope is to keep as mobile as possible, although I find those wee squeezy cushions (type sometimes used by pregnant women are helpful in behind your back - I have to sit quite a lot in work.One other thing - I've struggled to cope with this condition since being diagnosed a year ago or so - main problem I have is fatigue and pain when trying to exercise - have always struggled to get advice from any fellow sufferers due to age constraints (i'm only 30) but as most other people on this seem to be young sufferers also - has anyone any advice - this gets me down more than anything else.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 6, 2007
    • 04:24 PM
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  • hi there emma, i,ve had the signs of this terrible disease but i,ve not been diagnosed even after 2yrs and like you i have no blood test results to confirm, sick of the pain and stifness, its getting us all down i think. anyway, like someone mentioned earlier i think its a good idea to talk to you tutor, i,ve tried everything but i get no relief from whatever i try, even the pain killers dont work. i wish you luck in your studies and please if you find something to help you can you post it back onto this site. D. age 41
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 11, 2007
    • 06:33 PM
    • 0
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  • This is my story, in case it helps anyone...I was diagnosed with Seronegative Rheumatoid Arthritis about a year ago, specifically linked to Ulcerative Colitis which I had in the eighties. At that time I was crippled with severe joint pains in my knees and elbows, leaving me wheelchair bound. The doctors said that my problems were Secondary Arthritis (to the primary problem of Ulcerative Colitis), and they may well have been right. Regardless, on the advice of a friend, I followed a very healthy and 100% totally natural diet of chicken/liver/egg/fish salads and fruit, and over the course of the following year I returned to normality with no arthritic symptoms.Jumping forward twenty years to January 2006, I started to get all the normal symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis (sudden extreme fatigue, trigger finger(s), CTS, bad back, swollen joints, pins and needles etc.) but with no arthritis markers in my blood, no osteoarthritis signs, and being unusualy healthy in all other respects (I'm in my forties and am slim and fit). It took a lot of hospital visits, x-rays and blood tests before an Arthritis specialist diagnosed me with SRA but I also noted that my colitis had flared up again (evident by blood around my motions). The doctor explained that the two were linked but did not make any suggestions of self-help through diet.Against the doctor's advice, I did not take any of the worrying medication offered to me, but instead I resumed the strictly (100%) natural diet that I had followed in the eighties. It was inconvenient and required great will power, but it only took a few months before my Rheumatoid Arthritis symptoms disappeared. My specialist doctor seemed to treat my dietary actions with mild amusement at first, but has now taken a keener interest as I am, for now at least, completely cured of all Rheumatoid Arthritis symptoms. Needless to say, I plan to remain on this diet for the rest of my life.I am making this post in case my experiences point others on the road to recovery. My condition is specific to colitis, but how many others have SRA and undiagnosed Ulcerative Colitis? The diet which led to my recovery is based on the single principle of eating and drinking only things that the body is naturally designed to cope with. This means eating lots of fresh fruit and vegetables, fish, organic meat and eggs etc., and avoiding artificial preservatives, artificial flavourings, milk (lactose tolerance is a mutation allowing people to produce lactase after childhood, thus most adults are lactose intolerant without realising it, and develop symptoms as they get older), caffeine and non-organic meat etc. It also means eating plenty of fibre and taking vitamin or calcium supplements depending upon your exact food intake each day. A little bit of alcohol seems to be okay for me, so I drink Becks alcoholic beer (100% natural) in moderation on social occasions.If you do not understand what a balanced diet is, or what proteins, vitamins and minerals etc. are found in different types of food then you should seek advice from a dietician before changing your diet. But at the end of the day, what I follow is the ultimate healthy diet that anyone would benefit from, regardless of whether or not they have SRA. I would also add that this diet is unlikely to cure other forms of arthritis, other than in respect of keeping your body in optimum good health through diet.If you want to give it a go, shop at a big Tescos (for those in the UK) and look for the many organic products being sold (because by definition they will be free from additives and preservatives); milk-free products such as Soya milk, Soya spread, Soya custard, Soya ice cream, Soya yogurt etc.; and eat bran flakes for breakfast each day. Note also that nuts and raisins make a tasty snack, as do wholefood cereal/fruit bars.I hope this helps someone :)
    roytheboy 2 Replies
    • February 21, 2007
    • 11:50 AM
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  • Do you, or has a family member, have any history of psoriasis, excema, unexplained skin or nail problems? We with psoriatic arthritis are a small group, but once correct diagnoses are made, the numbers rise. I often tell people I have an autoimmune arthritis that's a lot like RA, because they don't know what PsA is! Look into your history for clues, if you find any, see your dermatologist or ask your rheumatologist for possbilities.good luck,patti
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi, I'm in the process of being diagnosed. Apparently I have all the physical symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis but not the blood tests to go with it. I'm at university at the moment and find it really difficult to sit down for so long in my two hour lectures, it usually starts hurting my hips and back after about half an hour. Does anyone know anything i can sit on or something to stop this pain? EmmaGet in touch with a dermatologist he may be able to help. I have been seeing all kinds of Doc. for 3 yrs no one could figure it out same symptoms as you, plus tiredness and constant pain in lower back, hips and fingers. I had a mild form of psorias as a child. 2 weeks ago my fingernails stated lifting my Doc. sent me to a dermatologist one look and he said I have Psoratic Arthritis. I'm just starting med. but he swears life will get better now with treatment. Don't give up keep trying different Doc. until someone gets it right
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Do you, or has a family member, have any history of psoriasis, excema, unexplained skin or nail problems?Yes, and no. I have Darier's Disease, which is similar in some respects to Psoriasis, but quite specifically different in others. Darier's is hereditary but in my case I was the first in my family to have it diagnosed by experts and confirmed with histology. I was then able to tell my mother to tell her doctor that he had made a wrong diagnosis in her case. Amazingly, her doctor still refuses to accept that she has Darier's even though he has not done the one thing that can prove it: a biopsy and histologic examination!I'm happy with my specialist's diagnosis of my form of SRA, mainly because if I eat something unnatural, I get a flair up of SRA the very next day. That's pretty conclusive to me. Also, Psoriatic Arthritis normally affects the finger joints AND the tendons in equal measure, whereas I get the tendon sheath problems long before the joints swell. Thanks anyway :)
    roytheboy 2 Replies Flag this Response
  • To those with sore hips etc and have trouble sitting for long periods, especially women - it is a good idea to be checked to see if you have a gene known as HLA-B27. This is the gene that is often associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis. Women can get this disease and not all of us who finally receive the diagnosis have the gene in question. Quite often we are misdiagnosed as having fibromyalgia. However, it is worth persisting until you get a diagnosis and do not let the doctors get away with a dx of FMS, especially if you have other indicators that point to some form of arthritis.My story began in 1987 and at that stage I was negative to the RF but had a low positive ANA and my ESR was normal. However, I was in a lot of pain. Twenty years later, I am still in pain and I respond to Celebrex and the other NSAIDs.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Hi Good day. I really dont know this site but still I tried because it might help my fiancee. He was diagnosed of a seronegative arthritis, but i dont understand if the seronegative rheuatoid arthritis and seronegative arthritis are the same. He also has a terrible pain in her feet, elbow, ankle, hands. He has bad days and good days. He is only 44 years old. He under medication but his doctor says he needs to take a very very strong one because his medication now is not working. I mean he is a lot better than before. I am just wondering if anybody here knows any very good specialist for him to get better. I am far away from him and i dont know how to help him so i hope looking for a very good specialist can help him to get better. By the way he is living in Canada. For all the advices you can give i will highly appreciate it. Thanks!!! Stoner
    stoner 1 Replies Flag this Response
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