Discussions By Condition: Anxiety

anxiety vs agitation

Posted In: Anxiety 8 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • January 21, 2007
  • 04:44 PM

I am having a hard time determining the difference between anxiety and agitation. I have been on SSRI's for many years for mild chronic depression and generalized anxiety disorder. I also take ativan for the more intense anxiety, when it hits. (I have a little bit of social phobia.)
Lately, though, I have been trying to re-****s my symptoms because I think that perhaps I should be taking a different class of drug...perhaps a mood stabilizer type drug?
I think, more than mild depression, my main symptoms are tiredness (sometimes I just want to sleep to escape), irritability, quick to become irritable and "snappy" (as my loving husband refers to it!), and for no reason at all...for instance, I'll find my self getting defensive and yelling...set off at the slightest thing. Then at other times, when you think I would get "snappy", I seem to handle things well.

Is this reactive, "snappy" thing agitation rather than anxiety???

So I am moody and this moodiness and irritability makes me feel sad, guilty and irritated with myself.

Would I be "better" on a mood stabilizer than the SSRI?
Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks.

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8 Replies:

  • Have you tried relaxation techniques, cognitive-behavioral therapy or herbal remedies? It is conjectured that Omega-3 fatty acids may have a mood stabilizing effect. These can make a difference in your anxiety/agitation. Medications like mood stabilizers are very potent drugs, and you can turn to meds at any time if non-drug treatments will fail.Here is the list of possible anxiety symptoms and self-help tips.As for "Mood stabilizers", these drugs are mainly used to treat bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. Mood stabilizers include lithium, and anticonvulsants (valproic acid, carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, topiramate). These meds work differently than SSRIs.Also, you can check your symptoms here:http://symptoms.wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/agitation/anxiety.htm
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 6, 2007
    • 02:02 PM
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  • I am going thru the exact same feelings. I am always on edge & get irritated very easy with my whole family. I don't have any social issues, I like being with my friends. My doctor has given me Zoloft, then Celexa any both helped calm me down, but I was way to tired to function daily. So after a few weeks he gave me Wellbutrin, the generic form, & I have been on this for about a week and these are not helping at all. I feel even more agitated. I looked up Wellbutrin & thats one of the first side effects is increased irritabilty. I have no idea what to try next. Every depression pill I read about is for people who cry all the time. I don't do that.What to do?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • I would love to know the answer to this. I feel the exact same way.....irritable all the time, moody, tense, and snapping at the smallest thing........My husband and family have been telling me something's not right and that I should talk to Dr. but I hestitate to do so.I know that being irritated at everything and everyone around me isn't normal and not sure what to do.Any suggestions?
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 3, 2007
    • 07:02 PM
    • 0
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  • I am having a hard time determining the difference between anxiety and agitation. I have been on SSRI's for many years for mild chronic depression and generalized anxiety disorder. I also take ativan for the more intense anxiety, when it hits. (I have a little bit of social phobia.)Lately, though, I have been trying to re-****s my symptoms because I think that perhaps I should be taking a different class of drug...perhaps a mood stabilizer type drug?I think, more than mild depression, my main symptoms are tiredness (sometimes I just want to sleep to escape), irritability, quick to become irritable and "snappy" (as my loving husband refers to it!), and for no reason at all...for instance, I'll find my self getting defensive and yelling...set off at the slightest thing. Then at other times, when you think I would get "snappy", I seem to handle things well. Is this reactive, "snappy" thing agitation rather than anxiety???So I am moody and this moodiness and irritability makes me feel sad, guilty and irritated with myself. Would I be "better" on a mood stabilizer than the SSRI?Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated.Thanks.I read your post by pure chance and I was amazed! I feel like I go through similiar "mood swings" almost to the "T"! I'm sorry I wish I had some helpful information for you! If you find anything out that would be helpful I hope you post it!Best Wishes!~T~
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 17, 2009
    • 11:27 PM
    • 0
    Flag this Response
  • I am having a hard time determining the difference between anxiety and agitation. I have been on SSRI's for many years for mild chronic depression and generalized anxiety disorder. I also take ativan for the more intense anxiety, when it hits. (I have a little bit of social phobia.)Lately, though, I have been trying to re-****s my symptoms because I think that perhaps I should be taking a different class of drug...perhaps a mood stabilizer type drug?I think, more than mild depression, my main symptoms are tiredness (sometimes I just want to sleep to escape), irritability, quick to become irritable and "snappy" (as my loving husband refers to it!), and for no reason at all...for instance, I'll find my self getting defensive and yelling...set off at the slightest thing. Then at other times, when you think I would get "snappy", I seem to handle things well. Is this reactive, "snappy" thing agitation rather than anxiety???So I am moody and this moodiness and irritability makes me feel sad, guilty and irritated with myself. Would I be "better" on a mood stabilizer than the SSRI?Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated.Thanks.I have the *exact* same problem, I don't feel anxious right now, but I feel kind of angry a lot, touchy, and definitely wanting to withdraw. I'm on celexa and buspar. I plan on talking to the psychiatrist at my next appointment about this.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 21, 2010
    • 03:00 PM
    • 0
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  • its sad how many people are dealing with this cuz i to have the same problem very badly going through the same treatments and nothing working
    mistyln1 5 Replies
    • September 21, 2010
    • 11:13 PM
    • 0
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  • I kind of have come across a similar experience, and my counselor and doctor are still trying to figure me out. While I am, in general, a very calm person I didn't recognize myself when I had my episode. It all happened with a breakup, a sick mother, and my younger sister moving far away. While those are issues that people encounter every day, it was the perfect storm that quickly triggered my first (and hopefully last) episode. On one side, I was nauseous and obsessively worried all the time. And on the other side I was angry and depressed with incoherent racing thoughts and obsessive thoughts about suicide. I stopped eating and sleeping. I lost 5 pounds in a week, and I'm a fly weight as it is. My mom had to hold me down while I was screaming and crying because I was so angry and scared. I did not recognize myself and never thought that I would be back to my "normal" self. There are two camps that have varying ideas on what my pathology is. 1) My counselor thinks, and while I have never had an episode before or any evidence of this, that my bipolar disorder has surfaced. Specifically he believes that I was in a mixed state (manic and depressed at the same time)>>. 2) While my psychiatrist is not discounting my counselor's diagnosis, she is leaning much toward anxiety and depression issues. She asks me where I physically feel my anxiety: tightness in my upper chest and tightness in my stomach/diaphragm region (classic anxiety features). It's funny because I can see both view points, severe anxiety with depression or manic and depressed at the same time. Regardless of which one it is, I was really bad off. I've always been a stable and relatively happy person with some smaller issues, but earlier this year I pulled a total 180. Here is the medication that has helped stabilize me, in addition to seeing a fantastic counselor: Seroquel 200 - a mood stabilizer, Prozac 60 mg, and Lorazapam .5 mg only when I am feeling very anxious (once or twice a week). Either way and whether or not I can definitively put my finger on the cause is of my issues, the medication combination seems to be working well for me (may not work for everyone). It's no magic by any means, but it does help.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • Bipolar II is a psychiatric disorder that involves mood swings from depressed to hypomanic states. Unlike bipolar I, also called manic depression, bipolar II does not involve manic states. However, like bipolar I, the person afflicted suffers from varying degrees of mood. Bipolar II may create depression or anxiety so great that risk of suicide is increased over those who suffer from Bipolar I.In order to properly diagnose Bipolar II, patients and their doctors must be able to recognize what constitutes hypomania. People in a hypomanic state may experience increased anxiety, sleeplessness, good mood, or irritability. The hypomanic state can last for four days or longer, and patients will note a significant difference in feelings from when they are in a depressed state. Hypomania may also cause people to feel more talkative, result in inflated self-esteem, make people feel as though their thoughts are racing, and in some cases result in rash choices, such as indiscriminate sexual activity or inappropriate spending sprees. Often, the person who feels anxious or irritable and also has bouts of depression is diagnosed with anxiety disorder with depression, or merely anxiety disorder. As such, they do not receive the proper treatment, because if given an anti-depressant alone, the hypomanic state can progress to a manic state, or periods of rapid cycling of mood can occur and cause further emotional disturbance.Ads by GoogleRehabilitation CentersTired of Searching? We Can Help. Free Rehab Referrals. Insurance OK. 4Rehabilitation.com/Centers Masters in Public Admin.Earn Your MPA Degree Online from Norwich U. No GRE. MPA.Norwich.Edu Suicide Prevention—TeensSuicide prevention screening programs. Get involved. www.teenscreen.org/Free-signup You Could Lose EverythingGet Your Money to Safety Now! Our Free Report Can Save Your Finances. www.MoneyandMarkets.com Rehabilitation CentersFind the Right Drug Rehab Center. Financing Available. Call Now! TheRehabAdvisor.com/RehabCenters Manic states differ from hypomania because perception of self is generally so deluded as to cause a person to act unsafely and take actions potentially permanently destructive to one’s relationships. Additionally, the manic person may be either paranoid or delusional. Those with mania may feel they are invincible. High manic states often require hospitalization to protect the patient from hurting himself or others. Conversely, hypomanic patients may find themselves extremely productive and happy during hypomanic periods. This can further complicate diagnosis. If a patient is taking anti-depressants, hypomania may be thought of as a sign that the anti-depressants are working.Ultimately, though, those with bipolar II find that anti-depressants alone do not provide relief, particularly since anti-depressants can aggravate the condition. Another hallmark of bipolar II is rapid cycling between depressed and hypomanic states. If this symptom is misdiagnosed, sedatives may be added to anti-depressants, further creating mood dysfunction.The frequent misdiagnosis of bipolar II likely creates more risk of suicidal tendencies during depressed states. Patients legitimately trying to seek treatment may feel initial benefits from improper medication, but then bottom out when treatments no longer work. The fact that multiple medications may be tried before the correct diagnosis is made can fuel despair and depression.Depression associated with either bipolar I or II is severe. In many cases, depression creates an inability to function normally. Patients suffering from major depression describe feeling as though things will never feel right again.Severely depressed patients may not leave their homes or their beds. Appetite can significantly increase or decrease. Sleeping patterns may be disrupted, and people may sleep much longer than usual. This type of depression does not respond to reason or talking it out, because it is of chemical origin. Though therapy can improve the way a person deals with depression, it cannot remove chemically based depression. Because of what seems an inescapable mood and a feeling that things will never improve, patients frequently contemplate and often attempt suicide.Once accurate diagnosis is made, treatment consists of many of the same medications used to treat bipolar I. These medications typically include mood stabilizers like lithium or anticonvulsants like carbamazepine (tegretol®), and many people also benefit from a low dose of an antidepressant. Those with bipolar II rarely need antipsychotic medications since they are not prone to psychotic symptoms or behavior. Even with appropriate medication, it may take some time to stabilize a patient and find the right dosage. When patients have demonstrated suicidal tendencies, hospitalization may be necessary to provide a safe environment where medications can be adjusted accordingly.When medication is combined with cognitive behavioral therapy, patients seem to respond more quickly and have the most success. Though bipolar II is not thought to be caused by traumatic events, such factors as a history of abuse can affect recovery. By approaching bipolar II with both therapy and medication, the patient is likely to recover fully.With treatment, those with bipolar I or II can live healthy normal lives and attain success in work and relationships. Many anticonvulsant medications are related to a high incidence of birth defects, however. Patients who are on medication and considering a pregnancy should seek the advice of both their psychiatrist and obstetrician before becoming pregnant.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • August 16, 2011
    • 03:29 PM
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