Discussions By Condition: Alzheimer's Disease

two year anniversay

Posted In: Alzheimer's Disease 10 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • August 30, 2006
  • 01:09 AM

Sept 29, 2004 my mother died from Alzheimers disease. She had only been diagnosed in Jan of 2000. I miss her very much.

What my family went through with this disease was not what we had expected. Mom seemed to fall into the the minority categories of many of the symptoms.

As a legacy to my mom, I have tried to answer questions and concerns of my friends and aquaintances in regard to their loved one who has or may have AD.

I would be happy to talk to anyone who is currently dealing with this devastating disease.

Sp3cial

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10 Replies:

  • I really feel your concern. My mother has this disease and its wearing me down. She can do anything else for her self but she knows when something is wrong but i don't think i can except her going home to be with the Lord.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 13, 2006
    • 09:04 PM
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  • I am so sorry that your mom has AD. It is indeed wearing on the family. I hope you have a good support system. If you don't I will be glad to do what I can to support you.Sometimes when talking to someone who has not experienced this disease it can be daunting to try and get them to understand what you're feeling. Treasure everyday with your mom.My thoughts are with you.Sp3cial
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • October 19, 2006
    • 01:34 AM
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  • My Dad is suffering from Alzheimer's and it has been rapid in progression. He is 82. My mother is really not dealing with things well. She does not drive; he is in the nursing home and she wants him home. He does not seem to know us most of the time and has a stage IV ulcer on his bottom which is very slow to heal, has had pneumonia, has not walked since February, requires a lift for transfers, etc. She is not accepting or does not want to accept his diagnosis. She thinks if she takes him home he will get better. This has been the hardest thing to go through ever. He is a kind, sweet, gentle, humble man and she has always had her way. Now she "fusses" at him when he does not know her. His sister is in the same nursing home and he gets them mixed up now and calls her the wrong name - calling my Mom by his sister's name. We go almost daily to see him and take her also and she stays 4-7 hours a day with him. She is 80. This week she fussed at him and said it killed her for him to call her the wrong name. He does not know us unless we tell him who we are and then he forgets quickly. How do you deal with the problem we are having and keep your sanity. It is devastating to see him this way but she is making it ******n everyone. We try to work out a schedule to take her since she does not drive and she says "I'll decide tomorrow when I want to go." We all work full time jobs, one 12 hour shifts, one lives away but helps as much as possible once a week and some still have children at home. We love him dearly but at what point do you put your job, children and spouse last. I know he would want us to keep them first. It is not like we are neglecting him but she is demanding and there is no way to take care of him at home. The nurse said he would require 24 hour a day care with all he has wrong and that is not possible with Medicare, Home Health and Hospice. Only one child is in a position to take family medical leave but even with that one person cannot do that much. How do you get through all of this. The heartbreak of seeing him this way has been terrible. He cannot communicate his wishes but she tries to act like he can and he has not spoke a full sentence in weeks. Most of what he says now is garbled. He says he wants to go home but maybe he is speaking of his Heavenly Home. Not sure how to get through the day some days. A lot of crying but it is affecting every familiy member.
    shortie 1 Replies
    • November 1, 2006
    • 00:34 AM
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  • Dear Shorty,I feel for you and your family,I worked in a rest home and have had a cleaning service for 18 yrs.And have been in close assoc.with about five people and their families going through the process of this heart wrenching disease,my heart cries with you.I can share with you what I have learned.Your Dad has changed,and will continue to change,but he is still here and needs love and support,his symtoms will worsen more quickly if he feels pressure to remember names,people,etc.For his sake,the family will have to get past their needs of wanting him to be as he used to be,He cant.When you visit,treat him as he is,and He is,someone you love very much,even if he does not know you,he can still feel the bond.I do hope your mother will come to terms with this soon so all of your times left together are happy ones.Your dad has to live in a safe place,and from reading his condition,he is at the stage where he can no longer be taken care of at home.Please dont stay in despair,I would give anything to be able to see my Dad,in any condition,hes in heaven now and I miss him so.i promise to keep you and your family in my prayers ,for strenght and peace.Sherry
    ugotz2know 2 Replies
    • November 6, 2006
    • 02:37 AM
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  • To Shortie and anyone else whose loved one suffers from Alzheimer's disease: Anyone with dementia or Alzheimer's disesase must be checked for vitamin B12 deficiency. A serum B12 test is not good enough for a variety of reasons and must be backed up with a methylmalonic acid (MMA) test. MMA is specific for B12 deficiency and is more sensitive at the tissue and cellular level. Doctors commonly overlook this, but B12 deficiency causes foggy thinking, forgetfulness,confusion, dementia, depression, and psychosis. B12 deficiency is common in the elderly for a variety of reasons. I have been an ER nurse for 20 years and I see many elderly diagnosed with dementia that actually had a true B12 deficiency. I have been researching vitamin B12 deficiency for 20 years (and actually have one form that strikes younger people). Out of frustration witnessing patients who needed B12 deficiency ruled out and proper testing but rarely got it---- I wrote a book titled, "Could It Be B12? An Epidemic of Misdiagnoses," Quill Driver Books, 2005, co-authored with a physician. 12 reviews on Amazon.com (3 from physicians). It reveals how the medical and health care community is really uneducated on B12 deficiency and how we are injurying, disabling, causing poor health, and wasting billions of dollars by not diagnosing early and providing proper treatment. I also just published an article regarding this in "Nursing 2007" January issue.B12 deficiency also causes gait and balance problems, paresthesias, tremor, dizziness, orthostatic hypotension, fatigue and weakness. One reason doctors miss it is they have been taught you have to be anemic or macrocytic to have a B12 deficiency. 1/3 of patients never exhibit those signs--fooling the practitioner.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 17, 2007
    • 11:52 PM
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  • this would seem to imply that up to a third of a.d. diagnoses are unsafe.would you say i am reading too much into your position?this would be wonderful news for many many people if true.please reply,very interested.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 24, 2007
    • 01:51 PM
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  • I do not know the exact statistics of how many patients diagnosed with dementia actually have dementia, but it is reported in the medical literature that 5-15% of people over age 65 have vitamin B12 deficiency that is not diagnosed. Even in middle age people, B12 deficiency causes foggy thinking, confusion, memory loss, forgetfulness, depression. Because B12 deficiency is treatable, you would think the standard of care would be to test all elders with more sensitive testing (ie. methylmalonic acid). There is a critical window of opportunity to treat B12 deficiency, otherwise injury will result--- which could be permanent dementia. There have been studies of people with dementia/Alzheimers who had low serum B12 levels/B12 deficiency---- and then given B12, and was reported that it only helped some (but, that could be because the deficiency was ongoing too long to reverse damage). Other patients have reversed with B12 therapy. It would only seem proper care to rule out B12 deficiency, with serum B12, methylmalonic acid, homocystiene in all patients presenting with dementia. Some may be helped 50%, it depends on how long one was deficient--- early diagnosis and screening is the key.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 24, 2007
    • 11:40 PM
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  • In the ER we have tested many patients that have come in with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's or dementia--- and have found some to be positive for B12 deficiency where their primary care doctor/specialists and repeated admissions have failed to make the diagnosis. Many patients falling sustaining fractures who have proven to be B12 deficient. Even if it is 10 people out of every 100---- those 10% deserve to be diagnosed and not suffer poor health, injury or disability. Doctors are missing it because they need to be reeducated.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 24, 2007
    • 11:44 PM
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  • yes i agree it doesnt matter how low the proportion is,it is still a lot of people.even if it were only one.......in your opinion does b.12 deficiency arise because of a dietary deficiency,or is it something else,like a metabolic problem?fascinating ,this,(and for a change not acupuncture!)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 26, 2007
    • 00:30 PM
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  • B12 deficiency can occur because of the following: 1. diet (vegans, vegetarians) anorexia, bulimia, poor diet 2. drugs or medications: metformin (Glucophage) taken by diabetics antacids, proton-pump inhibitors (Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, etc), H- 2 blockers, alcohol, nitrous oxide 3. autoimmune disease (autoimmune pernicious anemia) 4. gastric atrophy (hypochlorhydria) 30-40% people over age 60 get 5. gastrointestinal disease (Crohn's, celiac disease ) 6. gastrointestinal surgeries--- of the stomach, ileum (partial or complete removal)------ cancer including radiation therapygastric bypass surgery or intestinal bypass for weight loss The most common reason for B12 deficiency is because of malabsorption of this vitamin. There are several steps that need to take place for vitamin B12 to be absorbed. For more information, please read "Could It Be B12? An Epidemic of Misdiagnoses," Quill Driver Books, 2005---which will answer numerous questions and educate you further on this interesting disorder. :)
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • February 27, 2007
    • 02:53 AM
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