Discussions By Condition: Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's?

Posted In: Alzheimer's Disease 14 Replies
  • Posted By: Anonymous
  • April 15, 2007
  • 07:23 PM

My father is having issues that seem to me and my mom like alsheimer's.
He: has severe mood swings
forgets what he said and says he said something else. He then gets VERY angry when you tell him what he said
he's lost some fine motor skills
he gets, what I call, "the shakes" in his arms/hands

As far as the forgetting what he says bit- Just yesterday he said one thing multiple times to multiple people and then said he didn't say that, he said something else. He then got REALLY ANGRY when we (FIVE of us) told him what he DID say.

Does this sound like alzheimer's to anyone else? I used to be a CNA in nursing homes, so I am VERY familiar with alzheimer's, but I want other peoples' opinions too.
Also, he's very, very proud. He would never willingly go to a doctor about these issues.
Any ideas?

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14 Replies:

  • It could be alzheimer's, but he really needs to see a neurologist. If this has come on suddenly then it could be something else. As you are familiar with alzheimer's you should do some reading on how to treat a family member with the disease. Correcting the things that they say or telling them what they have said is very frustrating for them. There is a lot you can do to reduce agaitation and keep yourself sane as well.You may also want to start looking for alternative placement for him. I know its sad to say, but it really is necessary at a certain point. My grandmother went into a nursing home 9 years ago this may. No one expected that she would live this long after her alzheimer's diagnosis, which was a few years before her admittance to the nursing home. My grandfather did not want to put her in one, but she was admitted to the hospital for 16 days and they wouldn't release her home. She was dehydrated and had a feeding tube put in. No one expected her to ever get off tube feeds, but after a year of almost only being fed through a tube she was weaned off and started taking food by mouth. The feeding tube was removed. At this point she is 82 years old. She recognizes no one, does not say more than one word at a time, and does not respond to questions. She would never want to live like this.If you father is still coherent sometimes, I would find out his wishes. It may be hard to do, but so is watching someone deteriorate.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • There is a lot of new research emerging and possible treatments. Cortisol-induced neurotoxicity and HPA-axis dysregulation have also been postulated as pivotal pathophysiological processes in both Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia. The cortisol receptor antagonist mifepristone has showed benefit for mood and cognition in bipolar patients and is under investigation in AD. There are some similarities between them in terms of mood swing and other symptoms.There is also some relevance with specific genes and related findings are as follows and the same drug is being investigated using it as a gene switch system:2000: An Inducible Gene Knockout System for Alzheimer's Disease and Aging Researchhttp://www.ellisonfoundation.org/awrd.jsp?id=54New Scholar Award in Aging, 2000 The transgenic and gene knockout technology has proved to be a powerful system to elucidate in vivo functions of target genes and to establish mouse models of human diseases. However, the conventional approach introduces modifications in mouse germline, which may lead to adverse effects or may be fully compensated in development. Thus, the function of these genetic modifications in adults and during aging cannot be appropriately evaluated. Therefore, efficient introduction of somatic modifications, including both gene activation and gene knockout, in a given gene, at a given time, in a given tissue, is both essential and highly desirable for aging research. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by the deposition of b-amyloid plaques and loss of neurons in affected individuals. Genetic and biochemical analysis have provided compelling evidence that the generation and accumulation of Ab42, a peptide of 42 amino acids in length and deposited in the b-amyloid plaques, plays a crucial role in AD pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether it is the intracellular or secreted form of the peptide or whether it is the soluble or precipitated peptide that is toxic to the neurons. Mutations in Presenilin-1 (PS1) are linked to early onset of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) and are shown to foster the production of Ab42. Presented as an aging related protein, PS1 is also required for mammalian embryonic development as PS1 knockout mice die perinatally. In light of the essential roles of Ab42 and PS1 in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and a great demand for an inducible transgenic and gene knockout system for aging research, we propose to accomplish the following research objectives: 1) Develop a spatio-temporally controlled gene regulation system so that the target gene can be either induced or inactivated in the central nervous system (CNS) at a defined time frame. To achieve this, we plan to use the powerful "gene switch" system in which the genetic modifications will only occur following the application of the synthetic steroid mifepristone (RU486); 2) Generate transgenic lines expressing either intracellular or secreted Ab42 in adult brain for various lengths of time to determine the effect of various forms of Ab42, i.e., intracellular vs. extracellular, soluble vs. insoluble; and 3) Use the transgenic lines to generate inducible knockout of PS1 and determine its function in adult CNS. Final Research Summary:Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of senile dementia pathologically characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques and accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of affected individuals. There are two forms of AD, sporadic and familial. Familial AD (inherited) represents a small percentage of the total cases, yet we believe it can provide important clues about the disease process. Our study focuses on the genetic changes in familial AD. Two classes of genes have been identified in this category: the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins (PS1 and PS2). When these genes are mutated, the individuals will develop AD. My laboratory is interested in AD research using mouse genetics approach. We focus on two basic questions: One is to understand the physiological functions of AD-associated molecules and the other is to determine the pathogenic effects of the disease-causing mutations. We have generated an extensive panel of transgenic and gene knockout animals for APP, PS1 and PS2. Analysis of these mice yielded important information regarding the functions of these proteins both in their normal forms and when mutated in the case of familial AD. We discovered that presenilins play critical roles in tumorigenesis, immune function and pigmentation. We established an essential activity of presenilins in transporting proteins to the right organelles inside the cells. We have evidence to show that the AD mutant protein exhibits reduced activities. Although not apparent to the central nervous system and learning and memory process, we believe that these activities underline common cellular mechanisms of presenilins and are thus directly applicable to the central nervous system. Furthermore, our findings provide important therapeutic insights. Since presenilins are absolutely required for β-amyloid peptides production, inhibition of presenilin γ-secretase activity has been actively pursued as a potential strategy for AD treatment. Our results that mice with partial loss of presenilins develop severe age-dependent immune defects caution for a possible adverse effect with these inhibitors, especially in aged population. The long-term interest of my laboratory is to uncover novel pathways and to seek better understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis using mouse as a model system. This will lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets. We sincerely appreciate the generous support from The Ellison Medical Foundation.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • December 21, 2007
    • 08:13 AM
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  • Any sudden change in memory or personality is troubling. Sudden onset tremors are not a good thing either.Get him to a doctor to be examined. And I would highly recommend that your mother (and you if he allows it) be there for the history portion of the exam
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • January 12, 2009
    • 09:19 AM
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  • Amanda is absolutely correct. My father had Alzheimer's disease. It broke my mother's heart to watch him deteriorate. He lived nearly ten years with the disease before he passed away in 2005. #1. Don't correct your Dad when you know he has repeated himself over and over. #2. Don't argue with your Dad when you know what he may have said is wrong. Arguing only makes it worse. My Dad would get so mad he would storm out of the house and disappear down the street. My Mom crying on the phone asking me to go find him. It's a miracle he never got run over from some of the places I found him, but he had no clue where he was or how he got there. He didn't even "really" know me, although I was the closest to him besides my Mom. He just knew he could trust me. Towards the end Hospice was a Godsend. My Mom couldn't put him in a facility so she cared for him at home. Hospice provided everything. A visiting nurse came once a week to check on him and when he passed, they came to the house at 2:30 am to take care of calling the mortuary and everything. My Mom already had a living trust and "pre-need" set up for her and my Dad for burial. Hospice will only step in if the patient is terminally ill and has 6 months or less to live. They know these things from experience with Alzheimer patients. My Dad knew something was wrong but he didn't know what it was. At first he forgot things. Then he started misplacing things. In the final stages he was just existing without a life. I remember my Dad when he was at his best. That's all of us have to hold onto anymore. Remember, someone with Alzheimer's is experiencing life differently that you or I. There is no return from it once the progression begins. The medications prescribed didn't help my Dad, although he was on them for at least five years. When a person has the disease their brain functions begin to shut down. The longer they have the disease the more damage. My father didn't die from Alzheimers, just as someone with AIDS doesn't die from AIDS. With Alzheimers, the brain no longer has the ability to tell the body what to do or how to fight off infections by sending antibodies to attack things, so my Dad got a urinary tract infection and Pneumonia and both of these things are what caused his death because anti-biotics wouldn't work for someone in the final stages of the disease. Just remember this, if nothing else, some with Alzheimers cannot help or control what is happening to them and this is why they get angry when you try to correct them. As long as there is no physical harm involved, play along with them, let them say what they want, repeat themselves over and over. There's nothing they can do about it. Enjoy what little time you have left with the one you love because you'll regret it if you allow yourself to get upset and angry over something neither of you has any control. I speak from personal experience.
    zachy12 6 Replies
    • January 17, 2009
    • 04:59 AM
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  • Felix, I'm curious to know if "anyone" has ever thought that Attention Deficit and Alzheimer's Disease are related? Realizing that the latter is a digenerative disease probably rules out the connection, however, my biggest concern is that it's possible my father had both. He definately had AD and passed away in 2005 from the complications, but I do know that ADD or ADHD is heriditary. I have it, my son has is, my sister's son has it (I'm a woman and it's rare in women although possible.) The only way we all got ADD is because my father must have had it. My mother has never demonstrated either of them and she is now 82 and sharp as a whip. My father was 83 when he passed and had AD for nearly 10 years. Since ADD is a neuro-transmitter problem, is it possible that Alzheimer's is related in a round-about way?_______________________________________________________ Below information Taken from www.everydayhealth.comArticleAlzheimer's Disease CenterRecognizing the Symptoms The signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease are usually divided into two categories: cognitive (intellectual) and psychiatric. Cognitive signs and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease include:Loss of memoryLoss of language skillsLoss of motor functionLoss of ability to recognize familiar things Examples of psychiatric symptoms, which are not necessary for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, include:Personality changesDepression
    zachy12 6 Replies
    • January 17, 2009
    • 05:11 AM
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  • And Felix, I'm grasping at straws, I know, but is it possible that Ritalin can help Alzheimer's patients. I do know when I read about ADD and ADHD that the neuro-transmitters are not making a full connection in the brain and this is what causes children to have the problem of trying to pay attention, hence the term Attention Deficit. There are also cases from one extreme to the other. My son, for instance, is very loving and caring and wouldn't hurt a fly. My sister's son at age 7 was a juvenile delinquent that had to be put in a boy's home because he was totally out of control. My son is 24 and my nephew is 40. My nephew was diagnosed with childhood schizophrenia. When my son was diagnosed with ADD that's when we knew my nephew had the same thing when he was young. P.S. In my previous post I ran out of time and wanted to add the last psychiatric symptom of AD from the article that got cut off... Delusion.
    zachy12 6 Replies
    • January 17, 2009
    • 05:41 AM
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  • Knowing loved ones have Alzheimer's is hard to cope with. Looking for placement need not be the immediate solution. Many doctors feel familiar surroundings, loving care can be more comfortable for patients. This can be possible with care services like AmericanOutComes. They provide excellent home care services including infusion therapy. Please read about the new IVIG therapy for Alzheimer's patients. http://www.americanoutcomes.com/ivig-therapy.php
    SRiley 1 Replies
    • January 30, 2009
    • 06:39 AM
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  • Blaze; That's an interesting concept, Electromagnetic Pollution. Doesn't really explain Alzheimer's Disease though. AD is a degenerative one which means it mostly occurs in the elderly. Yes, it can occur in younger people, but it isn't as common. And how do you explain those who had Alzheimer's which in the old days many called Dimentia - they didn't have Satellite Towers or Large Antennas 50 or more years ago, at least not to the extent there are today. My father never used a cell phone in his life, my parents lived in a very rural part of the state so there were no "Large Antennas" or "Satellite Towers" - my father got AD at 75; my mother never got it. They were married for 58 years. It is interesting to note that my father spent 22 years in the Navy aboard ship - might have something to do with the Naval radar equipment since he was the navigator/chief signalman. Then again... my mother-in-law has Dimentia or possibly early onset of AD. She was never in the military and never aboard ship. Sounds like Alzheimer's is a hit and miss disease. Don't see a pattern or possible link, other than the Attention Deficit one. I remain, Donna
    zachy12 6 Replies
    • February 18, 2009
    • 05:47 AM
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  • i would say that it is really hard for the patient to know that they had the disease,AD.it is because the disease is progressive and slow.at first they might loss ability to recall the 5 minutes of memory.somehow it will progress to which the patient might loss ability in learning.the disease may last for about 20 years. however the patient might die because of infection. especially very severe urinary tract infection or pneumonia.so as the family members we should recognize the early sign and symptoms they had shown and bring them to see the doctor to have the true diagnosis.
    Anonymous 42789 Replies Flag this Response
  • My father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's at the age of 75. Up until then he was active, had his own business and seemed fine. My mother noticed he started forgetting things, like appointments he had made or the inability to keep track of how much was in his checking account. I remember he got really sick with pneumonia and had to be hospitalized for 2 weeks. This was before the AD symptoms began to appear. One day I was at their house and I overheard my father refer to me as "who is that girl?" My mom didn't have the heart to tell him he had Alzheimer's. They were married for 58 years. My mom took care of my dad at home and it had its toll on her. The Hospice people were so nice and caring and they were able to put him in a facility for one week to give my mom a break. I worked a full-time job so I could only help on the weekends or evenings. She really need a break after several years. It is very exhausting to take care of an active AD patient. My dad could get around pretty good, there was nothing wrong with his ability to walk around, or get into things he shouldn't. One day my mom turned her back while baking a pie and my dad picked up a cup of pennies on the counter and for no reason dumped them into the pie. Another time my mom went to get the mail, came back in and my dad had taken the top off the pepper shaker and dumped it all over the table and was playing in it. Just dumb little things, but it nearly drove her nuts. She couldn't leave him alone for five minutes. It was worse than taking care of a toddler. Her patience was wearing very thin. I didn't live there so I never could understand her frustration. I kept telling her "he can't help it, he doesn't know what he's doing." I think more of the frustration was that she remembered him as being so strong and in control and to see him waste away and become like a child was more than she could bear. So she let Hospice take him for a week to a facility in another town. Well, my dad couldn't sit still, was constantly walking around, etc. So after the first day the facility called my mom and said "you need to come over here and sign this form so we can confine your husband to a wheelchair." She relunctantly did so and that was the end of my dad. When she brought him home he could barely walk. Within a week he had to be put in a wheelchair because he couldn't keep his balance. After two weeks of the wheelchair he had to be put into a bed. Two weeks after the bed he went into the hospital with a urinary tract infection and pneumonia. When the doctor at the hospital found out my dad was under Hospice he had a fit. "Why did you bring him here? He's terminally ill. You should have left him for Hospice to take care of." They kept him for not quite a week. They released him and within a week he passed away. So from the one-week "day-care" til his death was about one month. My thoughts: Was he already sick when he went to that one-week facility? After they strapped him into the wheelchair did they ever change his depends? If not is this how he got the urinary tract infection? The Hospice worker told us that being in a wheelchair for a week without the opportunity to walk around was probably the beginning of the end for my dad. Being bedridden is just as bad because the muscles lose strength when not exercised. This is one of the reasons why hospitals will get surgery patients up and walking around as soon as the next day whenever possible. Besides, being bedridden, if you've never had to spend much time in a bed, can be very depressing. I've been hospitalized before and couldn't wait to get out of bed. Anyway, my father passed away in June of 2004 at the age of 83. My mother and I thank God that Hospice was there to help when we needed them. Anyone facing this or any other terminally ill disease should consider using Hospice. They do not ask for money, they rely strickly on donations. They supplied the wheelchair and the bed (those items get returned, you don't keep them). They also sent a nurse once a week to check my dad's vitals and a caregiver to give my dad a sponge bath. They were absolutely wonderful. After my dad passed away, at 3:00 in the morning, they came to my mom's house to call the mortuary. The mortuary was so respectful and did everything with such dignity. (My mom had paid in advance for her and my dad's burial needs with this mortuary, something that the elderly should really think about doing for themselves). Later that morning Hospice came and picked up the bed. My mom donated a lot of things to Hospice that I'm sure they could use. Anyone facing this or a similar situation should not hesitate to contact their local Hospice. The only requirement to receive their free help is the patient must be terminally ill and diagnosed with 6 months or less of life. You can get this information from the patient's doctor who will put it into writing if you ask. Hospice will provide a wheelchair, if needed, a hospital bed, if needed and a once a week visitation from an LVN. They will also send a caregiver who will help with bathing the patient, once a week. They do not provide sitter assistance. The one week away from home that my dad had was not Hospice run, it was a facility recommended by Hospice and is not available in all areas or for more than one week. It, too, was at no cost and if there is a facility near you there will be a waiting list because it is free. I think my mom waited for about 3 weeks.
    zachy12 6 Replies Flag this Response
  • I've been studying this subject for a while now. Looks like many things may help. Here is a few links and info to give you a jump on things:High homocysteine levels have been linked to Alzheimer's. I am replacing crap in the diet with RAW fruit, vegetables, GREENS, nuts seeds. Taking out all refined sugar and flour. Meat in moderation, and only from range/grass fed cows. I might have 1 cup daily of UNPASTEURIZED milk from a goat daily, and maybe boiled eggs from my own chickens. Changing the diet is maybe the most important thing to bring homocysteine levels down. And methylcobalamin helps with that, too.http://www.drmirkin.com/morehealth/9894.htmlMethylene Blue (used as goldfish treatment and laboratory stain):http://geddarkstorm.livejournal.com/188959.htmlhttp://pipeline.corante.com/archives/2008/07/31/rember_for_alzheimers_methylene_blues_comeback.phpTHC (the stuff in cannabis that makes you high):http://www.futurepundit.com/archives/003641.htmlhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTzDpf_aRVEhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6VTR92jZbAMJ tincture made with the hot method looks like the best way to take it:http://www.rollitup.org/2441765-post1.htmlHigh doses of Methylcobalamin(forget about cyanocobalamin or hydroxocobalamin, useless for Alzheimer's):(click the link, and then scroll down to Alzheimer's)http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag98/aug98-report1.htmlhttp://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=481Niacin:http://www.futurepundit.com/archives/005683.htmlMSM:http://www.cancertutor.com/Cancer/MSM.html(the above link is not about msm and alzheimer's, but does suggest effective dosages, and what to avoid)http://www.theolivebranch.com/news/msm.htm(click link and scroll down to 'Alzheimer's')Perispinal Enbrel injections for Alzheimer's (expensive, but seems to be effective):http://www.articlesbase.com/medicine-articles/rapid-improvement-in-function-in-alzheimers-after-enbrel-injection-373404.htmlhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJ62s3air7oMethylfolate should be taken also.Calcium Ascorbate powder, vitamin c that is much better for you than the normal kind. Easier on the stomach, non-acidic, more bioavailable. Powder/crystals mixed in water or juice is best.Daily walks.Also, consider that Alzheimer's has some things in common with other degenerative neurological disorders, and get to reading these threads:http://forums.wrongdiagnosis.com/showthread.php?p=84898&highlight=supplier#post84898http://www.als.net/forum/default.aspx?g=posts&t=46439More interesting stuff about methylcobalamin (the stuff in this nasal spray):http://recoveryvideos.com/autism/methylcobalamin-vitamin-b12.htmlBrand is very important. If you get methylcobalamin sublingual lozonges, I recommend Jarrow 5000 mcg (5 mg). Then there is always methyl-mate. If you get some, make sure you request a free nasal spray bottle with it. You will absorb more of what you take, if you take it in nasal spray. 3 sprays is supposed to be equal to 1000 mcg (1mg). For MSM, whatever you get, make sure it has no silicon or silicon dioxide in it. Make sure it is the purest crystals or powder you can get from your healthfood store. For Methylene Blue, this looks good to me:http://cgi.ebay.com/120-ML-RID-ALL-METHYLENE-BLUE-1-B-V-F-AQUARIUM-REMEDY_W0QQitemZ200332584738QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item2ea4c0a722&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116
    Boo Radley 10 Replies
    • August 31, 2009
    • 11:47 PM
    • 0
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  • Sounds so much like the beginning of my father's downward spiralSo lemme get a bit out there before I bother stating an opinion.My father was very much the hard partying type at a younger age probably from age 14-25 he drank as oh so many do, marijuana on a multiple times a day basis, L.S.D. Probably averaged in those years quoted maybe 3 times a week, and the occasional Mushrooms dosage..So as a former "druggie" he always seemed to have a pinch of paranoia with pretty much everything. As he got older this trait became more and more evident. He never did like doctors or pills. He was extremely physically active in martial arts. He obtained a secon degree black belt in Goshin Jitsu, A Black belt in Judo, a Brown belt in aikido *spelling, and a black belt in Kwamukan Karate. He practiced and learned these for years from the age of 16 up until about the age of 45.As my father reached the age of about 48 ( I know that seems extremely young to some diagnosis ) he began to start with the process of reduced memory function. He was very proud and extremely skilled Repairing, maintaining, installing, and operating CNC machine tools, He was also a journeyman electrician. As his ability to function in the work place he once greatly acceled at declined he began to withdraw from basically everyone. After a while he began working on moving me, my brother, my mother, and him out of the state we were living in. During a trip out of state by himself he got lost. He had no where to stay, not enough money for a hotel, and just would not listen to any reason on the phone. On the first day he slept in his cargo van at a truck stop. On the second day still not willing to listen to reason he slept in his van on the side of the highway. On the third day when we managed to contact him he was totally lost, incoherant of any and all surroundings, when talking he rambled about things in his past, and then his paranoia in combination with his pride, lack of food and liquids, and being in a totally unfamiliar area broke him down to rambling things that don't cross the mind of anyone whos thinking clearly. Anyways after 12 hours of the state highway patrol keeping an eye out they finally happened upon him along a road side crying, babbling, and hugging the officers calling the 2 officers by me and my brothers names. We went and got him at 3 in the morning after a 9 hour drive to where he happened to be. After this incident we knew that something had to be wrong. He refused to see a doctor of his own choice. After he recovered and seemed to be back up to par on food and hydration he began a spiral downwards I can't even really believe. He was aggitated, aggresive, and rude for quite a while before he snapped in another way. Being raised right when he got in a screaming match with my mother, I attempted to calm things but to no avail. Eventually the arguement ended up between me and him he attempted to hit me by the end of it. We held off to start with I went to my room and let him settle best we could. The next day we called for a psychological evaluation the kind where the police come and escort you. In the state we were in it was a 24 hour evaluation period. He was taken in evaluated, cat scanned, and released within 9 hours. These medical records still havent been released to anyone in my family. He surely was not diagnosed by these doctors of having early onset alzheimer's. Afterwards in a few months time my mother in an attempt to calm him and hopefully comfort him packed us all up and we moved to where he had been scouting. His driving was surely not to be trusted ever since the interstate incident. But without a diagnosis he was free to drive as he wished in the car he owned. This continued for about 4 months once we got to the new house until he blew out his standard transmition on the highway attempting to do 60 in first gear. He did have a key to my mother's car but with his mind slowly slipping we managed to get it back from him. This was one of the few godsends we had over the years.His memory continued to decline. As we watched unable to get him to go to a doctor to seek some sort of help. Eventually he couldn't be left alone safely. Me and my brother started to stay home day and night, one sleeping while the other was awake. My mother continued to work supporting all 3 of us who weren't working. All the time waiting for the magical day he would swallow his pride and finally go see a doctor to hopefully get some help. He progressed into sleeping randomly here and there walking up and down the hall constantly when he wasn't sitting at the pc attempting to operate it. He often would click desktop icons changing their names in an attempt to type in a search or a web address. Yet when going to a doctor was mentioned he always managed to argue, scream, and totally refuse. Anywho after 6 and a half years of this and the progression to this state and down from this state one day he began yelling about the wiring in the house trying to rip lights from the wall fixtures. It got to the point of either he was gonna have to get subdued by one of us physically or we could call the police. We called and they COULD NOT take him in for an evaluation even in this state when they arrived. My mother had to go get some form filled out at the emergency room to have him forcefully taken in for an evaluation.Any ways so at the age of 56 my father was finally taken in, held, evaluated to the fullest extent they could including hearings for hold extensions. Finally diagnosed.The police had their hands tied by laws. So did we. But Police, emergency room physicians, your own doctor, and quite a few of the alzheimer's sites out there have information regarding your state. Try asking any doctor you can get your hands on about it most can clue you into the path you might have to take to try and get him in to get checked up on and diagnosed what ever that diagnosis might be. Since you've been around doctors and the like you probably know some who might be able to point some places... I really wish my father wasn't so proud. I wish I would have asked around. He is still alive living in a care facility. But maybe if it would have been caught earlier, something at least could have slowed it down. I miss my dad and even a few more years where he could remember me, my brother, and my mother's names at least would have been nice.Little hard to type now but... No matter how much pride your father has and how much you don't wanna have to go around it by force... I would honestly try and force him to go get help if there's anyway possible in your current location. Regards .. Kevin
    Anonymous 42789 Replies
    • September 5, 2009
    • 04:35 AM
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  • Based from my experience with my lola, she tends to be moody most of the time. She says something then eventually forget what she said. Being forgetful like to the names of other people is one of the symptoms. They react like people who have mental disorder but they aren't like them. Oh, btw, this happened after her major operation. I don't know the real story, but as far as I know, she went into a coma then she woke up with this condition. I don't know if this has something to do with it.
    tejoey 5 Replies
    • October 19, 2010
    • 03:33 AM
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  • The age of my sis is 44 and I found her forgetting many day to day things. Most of the time I found that she is forgetting things related to cooking , as I know she never liked cooking. Otherwise she is very active in other activities. She is working and very rarely she forget there as career is her passion. Whether this is case of Alzheimer ? Or is it related to other aspect as she is nearing menapouse?
    palmahy93 4 Replies Flag this Response
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